No Cover Image

Journal article 504 views 92 downloads

Combined use of the entomopathogenic fungus, Metarhizium brunneum , and the mosquito predator, Toxorhynchites brevipalpis, for control of mosquito larvae: Is this a risky biocontrol strategy?

Abeer M. Alkhaibari, Thierry Maffeis Orcid Logo, James Bull Orcid Logo, Tariq Butt Orcid Logo

Journal of Invertebrate Pathology

Swansea University Authors: Thierry Maffeis Orcid Logo, James Bull Orcid Logo, Tariq Butt Orcid Logo

Abstract

Mosquitoes transmit several diseases, which are of global significance (malaria, dengue, yellow fever, Zika). The geographic range of mosquitoes is increasing due to climate change, tourism and trade. Both conidial and blastospore formulations of the entomopathogenic fungus, Metarhizium brunneum ARS...

Full description

Published in: Journal of Invertebrate Pathology
ISSN: 0022-2011
Published: 2018
Online Access: Check full text

URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa38405
Tags: Add Tag
No Tags, Be the first to tag this record!
first_indexed 2018-02-06T20:28:24Z
last_indexed 2018-03-19T20:35:33Z
id cronfa38405
recordtype SURis
fullrecord <?xml version="1.0"?><rfc1807><datestamp>2018-03-19T16:21:06.7382856</datestamp><bib-version>v2</bib-version><id>38405</id><entry>2018-02-06</entry><title>Combined use of the entomopathogenic fungus, Metarhizium brunneum , and the mosquito predator, Toxorhynchites brevipalpis, for control of mosquito larvae: Is this a risky biocontrol strategy?</title><swanseaauthors><author><sid>992eb4cb18b61c0cd3da6e0215ac787c</sid><ORCID>0000-0003-2357-0092</ORCID><firstname>Thierry</firstname><surname>Maffeis</surname><name>Thierry Maffeis</name><active>true</active><ethesisStudent>false</ethesisStudent></author><author><sid>20742518482c020c80b81b88e5313356</sid><ORCID>0000-0002-4373-6830</ORCID><firstname>James</firstname><surname>Bull</surname><name>James Bull</name><active>true</active><ethesisStudent>false</ethesisStudent></author><author><sid>85d1c2ddde272a1176e74978e25ebece</sid><ORCID>0000-0002-8789-9543</ORCID><firstname>Tariq</firstname><surname>Butt</surname><name>Tariq Butt</name><active>true</active><ethesisStudent>false</ethesisStudent></author></swanseaauthors><date>2018-02-06</date><deptcode>EEEG</deptcode><abstract>Mosquitoes transmit several diseases, which are of global significance (malaria, dengue, yellow fever, Zika). The geographic range of mosquitoes is increasing due to climate change, tourism and trade. Both conidial and blastospore formulations of the entomopathogenic fungus, Metarhizium brunneum ARSEF 4556, are being investigated as mosquito larvicides. However, concerns have been raised over possible non-target impacts to arthropod mosquito predators such as larvae of Toxorhynchites brevipalpis which feed on larvae of mosquito vector species. Laboratory-based, small container bioassays showed, that T. bevipalpis larvae are susceptible to relatively high concentrations (i.e. &#x2265;107 spores ml-1) of inoculum with blastospores being significantly more virulent than conidia. At lower concentrations (e.g. &lt;107 spores ml-1), it appears that M. brunneum complements T. brevipalpis resulting in higher control than if either agent was used alone. At a concentration of 105 spores ml-1, the LT50 of for conidia and blastospores alone was 5.64 days (95% CI: 4.79 - 6.49 days) and 3.89 days (95% CI: 3.53 - 4.25 days), respectively. In combination with T. brevipalpis, this was reduced to 3.15 days (95% CI: 2.82 - 3.48 days) and 2.82 days (95% CI: 2.55 - 3.08 days). Here, combined treatment with the fungus and predator was beneficial but weaker than additive. At 107 and 108 blastospores ml-1, mosquito larval mortality was mostly due to the fungal pathogen when the predator was combined with blastospores. However, with conidia, the effects of combined treatment were additive/synergistic at these high concentrations.. Optimisation of fungal concentration and formulation will reduce: (1) risk to the predator and (2) application rates and costs of M. brunneum for control of mosquito larvae.</abstract><type>Journal Article</type><journal>Journal of Invertebrate Pathology</journal><publisher/><issnPrint>0022-2011</issnPrint><keywords>Aedes; Metarhizium; Toxorhynchites; Predator; Fungal pathogen; Blastospores; Conidia; Risk assessment; interaction</keywords><publishedDay>31</publishedDay><publishedMonth>12</publishedMonth><publishedYear>2018</publishedYear><publishedDate>2018-12-31</publishedDate><doi>10.1016/j.jip.2018.02.003</doi><url/><notes/><college>COLLEGE NANME</college><department>Electronic and Electrical Engineering</department><CollegeCode>COLLEGE CODE</CollegeCode><DepartmentCode>EEEG</DepartmentCode><institution>Swansea University</institution><apcterm/><lastEdited>2018-03-19T16:21:06.7382856</lastEdited><Created>2018-02-06T15:35:11.7443774</Created><path><level id="1">College of Engineering</level><level id="2">Engineering</level></path><authors><author><firstname>Abeer M.</firstname><surname>Alkhaibari</surname><order>1</order></author><author><firstname>Thierry</firstname><surname>Maffeis</surname><orcid>0000-0003-2357-0092</orcid><order>2</order></author><author><firstname>James</firstname><surname>Bull</surname><orcid>0000-0002-4373-6830</orcid><order>3</order></author><author><firstname>Tariq</firstname><surname>Butt</surname><orcid>0000-0002-8789-9543</orcid><order>4</order></author></authors><documents><document><filename>0038405-06022018153701.pdf</filename><originalFilename>alkhaibari2018.pdf</originalFilename><uploaded>2018-02-06T15:37:01.4600000</uploaded><type>Output</type><contentLength>3163968</contentLength><contentType>application/pdf</contentType><version>Accepted Manuscript</version><cronfaStatus>true</cronfaStatus><embargoDate>2019-02-06T00:00:00.0000000</embargoDate><copyrightCorrect>true</copyrightCorrect><language>eng</language></document></documents><OutputDurs/></rfc1807>
spelling 2018-03-19T16:21:06.7382856 v2 38405 2018-02-06 Combined use of the entomopathogenic fungus, Metarhizium brunneum , and the mosquito predator, Toxorhynchites brevipalpis, for control of mosquito larvae: Is this a risky biocontrol strategy? 992eb4cb18b61c0cd3da6e0215ac787c 0000-0003-2357-0092 Thierry Maffeis Thierry Maffeis true false 20742518482c020c80b81b88e5313356 0000-0002-4373-6830 James Bull James Bull true false 85d1c2ddde272a1176e74978e25ebece 0000-0002-8789-9543 Tariq Butt Tariq Butt true false 2018-02-06 EEEG Mosquitoes transmit several diseases, which are of global significance (malaria, dengue, yellow fever, Zika). The geographic range of mosquitoes is increasing due to climate change, tourism and trade. Both conidial and blastospore formulations of the entomopathogenic fungus, Metarhizium brunneum ARSEF 4556, are being investigated as mosquito larvicides. However, concerns have been raised over possible non-target impacts to arthropod mosquito predators such as larvae of Toxorhynchites brevipalpis which feed on larvae of mosquito vector species. Laboratory-based, small container bioassays showed, that T. bevipalpis larvae are susceptible to relatively high concentrations (i.e. ≥107 spores ml-1) of inoculum with blastospores being significantly more virulent than conidia. At lower concentrations (e.g. <107 spores ml-1), it appears that M. brunneum complements T. brevipalpis resulting in higher control than if either agent was used alone. At a concentration of 105 spores ml-1, the LT50 of for conidia and blastospores alone was 5.64 days (95% CI: 4.79 - 6.49 days) and 3.89 days (95% CI: 3.53 - 4.25 days), respectively. In combination with T. brevipalpis, this was reduced to 3.15 days (95% CI: 2.82 - 3.48 days) and 2.82 days (95% CI: 2.55 - 3.08 days). Here, combined treatment with the fungus and predator was beneficial but weaker than additive. At 107 and 108 blastospores ml-1, mosquito larval mortality was mostly due to the fungal pathogen when the predator was combined with blastospores. However, with conidia, the effects of combined treatment were additive/synergistic at these high concentrations.. Optimisation of fungal concentration and formulation will reduce: (1) risk to the predator and (2) application rates and costs of M. brunneum for control of mosquito larvae. Journal Article Journal of Invertebrate Pathology 0022-2011 Aedes; Metarhizium; Toxorhynchites; Predator; Fungal pathogen; Blastospores; Conidia; Risk assessment; interaction 31 12 2018 2018-12-31 10.1016/j.jip.2018.02.003 COLLEGE NANME Electronic and Electrical Engineering COLLEGE CODE EEEG Swansea University 2018-03-19T16:21:06.7382856 2018-02-06T15:35:11.7443774 College of Engineering Engineering Abeer M. Alkhaibari 1 Thierry Maffeis 0000-0003-2357-0092 2 James Bull 0000-0002-4373-6830 3 Tariq Butt 0000-0002-8789-9543 4 0038405-06022018153701.pdf alkhaibari2018.pdf 2018-02-06T15:37:01.4600000 Output 3163968 application/pdf Accepted Manuscript true 2019-02-06T00:00:00.0000000 true eng
title Combined use of the entomopathogenic fungus, Metarhizium brunneum , and the mosquito predator, Toxorhynchites brevipalpis, for control of mosquito larvae: Is this a risky biocontrol strategy?
spellingShingle Combined use of the entomopathogenic fungus, Metarhizium brunneum , and the mosquito predator, Toxorhynchites brevipalpis, for control of mosquito larvae: Is this a risky biocontrol strategy?
Thierry Maffeis
James Bull
Tariq Butt
title_short Combined use of the entomopathogenic fungus, Metarhizium brunneum , and the mosquito predator, Toxorhynchites brevipalpis, for control of mosquito larvae: Is this a risky biocontrol strategy?
title_full Combined use of the entomopathogenic fungus, Metarhizium brunneum , and the mosquito predator, Toxorhynchites brevipalpis, for control of mosquito larvae: Is this a risky biocontrol strategy?
title_fullStr Combined use of the entomopathogenic fungus, Metarhizium brunneum , and the mosquito predator, Toxorhynchites brevipalpis, for control of mosquito larvae: Is this a risky biocontrol strategy?
title_full_unstemmed Combined use of the entomopathogenic fungus, Metarhizium brunneum , and the mosquito predator, Toxorhynchites brevipalpis, for control of mosquito larvae: Is this a risky biocontrol strategy?
title_sort Combined use of the entomopathogenic fungus, Metarhizium brunneum , and the mosquito predator, Toxorhynchites brevipalpis, for control of mosquito larvae: Is this a risky biocontrol strategy?
author_id_str_mv 992eb4cb18b61c0cd3da6e0215ac787c
20742518482c020c80b81b88e5313356
85d1c2ddde272a1176e74978e25ebece
author_id_fullname_str_mv 992eb4cb18b61c0cd3da6e0215ac787c_***_Thierry Maffeis
20742518482c020c80b81b88e5313356_***_James Bull
85d1c2ddde272a1176e74978e25ebece_***_Tariq Butt
author Thierry Maffeis
James Bull
Tariq Butt
author2 Abeer M. Alkhaibari
Thierry Maffeis
James Bull
Tariq Butt
format Journal article
container_title Journal of Invertebrate Pathology
publishDate 2018
institution Swansea University
issn 0022-2011
doi_str_mv 10.1016/j.jip.2018.02.003
college_str College of Engineering
hierarchytype
hierarchy_top_id collegeofengineering
hierarchy_top_title College of Engineering
hierarchy_parent_id collegeofengineering
hierarchy_parent_title College of Engineering
department_str Engineering{{{_:::_}}}College of Engineering{{{_:::_}}}Engineering
document_store_str 1
active_str 0
description Mosquitoes transmit several diseases, which are of global significance (malaria, dengue, yellow fever, Zika). The geographic range of mosquitoes is increasing due to climate change, tourism and trade. Both conidial and blastospore formulations of the entomopathogenic fungus, Metarhizium brunneum ARSEF 4556, are being investigated as mosquito larvicides. However, concerns have been raised over possible non-target impacts to arthropod mosquito predators such as larvae of Toxorhynchites brevipalpis which feed on larvae of mosquito vector species. Laboratory-based, small container bioassays showed, that T. bevipalpis larvae are susceptible to relatively high concentrations (i.e. ≥107 spores ml-1) of inoculum with blastospores being significantly more virulent than conidia. At lower concentrations (e.g. <107 spores ml-1), it appears that M. brunneum complements T. brevipalpis resulting in higher control than if either agent was used alone. At a concentration of 105 spores ml-1, the LT50 of for conidia and blastospores alone was 5.64 days (95% CI: 4.79 - 6.49 days) and 3.89 days (95% CI: 3.53 - 4.25 days), respectively. In combination with T. brevipalpis, this was reduced to 3.15 days (95% CI: 2.82 - 3.48 days) and 2.82 days (95% CI: 2.55 - 3.08 days). Here, combined treatment with the fungus and predator was beneficial but weaker than additive. At 107 and 108 blastospores ml-1, mosquito larval mortality was mostly due to the fungal pathogen when the predator was combined with blastospores. However, with conidia, the effects of combined treatment were additive/synergistic at these high concentrations.. Optimisation of fungal concentration and formulation will reduce: (1) risk to the predator and (2) application rates and costs of M. brunneum for control of mosquito larvae.
published_date 2018-12-31T03:52:10Z
_version_ 1737026469263048704
score 10.878606