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The nature of delayed dream incorporation (‘dream-lag effect’): Personally significant events persist, but not major daily activities or concerns / Mark, Blagrove

Journal of Sleep Research, Volume: 28, Issue: 1, Start page: e12697

Swansea University Author: Mark, Blagrove

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DOI (Published version): 10.1111/jsr.12697

Abstract

Incorporation of details from waking life events into rapid eye movement (REM) sleep dreams has been found to be highest on the 2 nights after, and then 5–7 nights after, the event. These are termed, respectively, the day‐residue and dream‐lag effects. This study is the first to categorize types of...

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Published in: Journal of Sleep Research
ISSN: 09621105
Published: 2019
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URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa39550
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spelling 2019-01-29T16:46:59.0037554 v2 39550 2018-04-23 The nature of delayed dream incorporation (‘dream-lag effect’): Personally significant events persist, but not major daily activities or concerns 8c78ee008e650b9f0a463bae56a5636c 0000-0002-9854-1854 Mark Blagrove Mark Blagrove true false 2018-04-23 HPS Incorporation of details from waking life events into rapid eye movement (REM) sleep dreams has been found to be highest on the 2 nights after, and then 5–7 nights after, the event. These are termed, respectively, the day‐residue and dream‐lag effects. This study is the first to categorize types of waking life experiences and compare their incorporation into dreams across multiple successive nights. Thirty‐eight participants completed a daily diary each evening and a dream diary each morning for 14 days. In the daily diary, three categories of experiences were reported: major daily activities (MDAs), personally significant events (PSEs) and major concerns (MCs). After the 14‐day period each participant identified the correspondence between items in their daily diaries and subsequent dream reports. The day‐residue and dream‐lag effects were found for the incorporation of PSEs into dreams (effect sizes of .33 and .27, respectively), but only for participants (n = 19) who had a below‐median total number of correspondences between daily diary items and dream reports (termed “low‐incorporators” as opposed to “high‐incorporators”). Neither the day‐residue or dream‐lag effects were found for MDAs or MCs. This U‐shaped timescale of incorporation of events from daily life into dreams has been proposed to reflect REM sleep‐dependent memory consolidation, possibly related to emotional memory processing. This study had a larger sample size of dreams than any dream‐lag study hitherto with trained participants. Coupled with previous successful replications, there is thus substantial evidence supporting the dream‐lag effect and further explorations of its mechanism, including its neural underpinnings, are warranted. Journal Article Journal of Sleep Research 28 1 e12697 09621105 sleep; dreaming; REM sleep; 18 1 2019 2019-01-18 10.1111/jsr.12697 https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/epdf/10.1111/jsr.12697 COLLEGE NANME Psychology COLLEGE CODE HPS Swansea University RCUK; ESRC 2019-01-29T16:46:59.0037554 2018-04-23T14:39:40.5645621 College of Human and Health Sciences Psychology Jean-Baptiste Eichenlaub 1 Elaine van Rijn 2 Mairéad Phelan 3 Larnia Ryder 4 M. Gareth Gaskell 5 Penelope A. Lewis 6 Matthew P. Walker 7 Mark Blagrove 0000-0002-9854-1854 8 0039550-18012019163029.pdf Eichenlaub_et_al-2019-Journal_of_Sleep_Research.pdf 2019-01-18T16:30:29.7730000 Output 577512 application/pdf Version of Record true 2019-01-18T00:00:00.0000000 Released under the terms of a Creative Commons Attribution License (CC-BY). true eng
title The nature of delayed dream incorporation (‘dream-lag effect’): Personally significant events persist, but not major daily activities or concerns
spellingShingle The nature of delayed dream incorporation (‘dream-lag effect’): Personally significant events persist, but not major daily activities or concerns
Mark, Blagrove
title_short The nature of delayed dream incorporation (‘dream-lag effect’): Personally significant events persist, but not major daily activities or concerns
title_full The nature of delayed dream incorporation (‘dream-lag effect’): Personally significant events persist, but not major daily activities or concerns
title_fullStr The nature of delayed dream incorporation (‘dream-lag effect’): Personally significant events persist, but not major daily activities or concerns
title_full_unstemmed The nature of delayed dream incorporation (‘dream-lag effect’): Personally significant events persist, but not major daily activities or concerns
title_sort The nature of delayed dream incorporation (‘dream-lag effect’): Personally significant events persist, but not major daily activities or concerns
author_id_str_mv 8c78ee008e650b9f0a463bae56a5636c
author_id_fullname_str_mv 8c78ee008e650b9f0a463bae56a5636c_***_Mark, Blagrove
author Mark, Blagrove
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description Incorporation of details from waking life events into rapid eye movement (REM) sleep dreams has been found to be highest on the 2 nights after, and then 5–7 nights after, the event. These are termed, respectively, the day‐residue and dream‐lag effects. This study is the first to categorize types of waking life experiences and compare their incorporation into dreams across multiple successive nights. Thirty‐eight participants completed a daily diary each evening and a dream diary each morning for 14 days. In the daily diary, three categories of experiences were reported: major daily activities (MDAs), personally significant events (PSEs) and major concerns (MCs). After the 14‐day period each participant identified the correspondence between items in their daily diaries and subsequent dream reports. The day‐residue and dream‐lag effects were found for the incorporation of PSEs into dreams (effect sizes of .33 and .27, respectively), but only for participants (n = 19) who had a below‐median total number of correspondences between daily diary items and dream reports (termed “low‐incorporators” as opposed to “high‐incorporators”). Neither the day‐residue or dream‐lag effects were found for MDAs or MCs. This U‐shaped timescale of incorporation of events from daily life into dreams has been proposed to reflect REM sleep‐dependent memory consolidation, possibly related to emotional memory processing. This study had a larger sample size of dreams than any dream‐lag study hitherto with trained participants. Coupled with previous successful replications, there is thus substantial evidence supporting the dream‐lag effect and further explorations of its mechanism, including its neural underpinnings, are warranted.
published_date 2019-01-18T03:53:27Z
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