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The association between physical activity, fitness and body mass index on mental well-being and quality of life in adolescents / William T. B. Eddolls, Melitta McNarry, Leanne Lester, Charles O. N. Winn, Gareth Stratton, Kelly Mackintosh

Quality of Life Research, Volume: 27, Issue: 9, Pages: 2313 - 2320

Swansea University Authors: Melitta McNarry, Gareth Stratton, Kelly Mackintosh

Abstract

Purpose: The purpose of the current study was to investigate the mediatory role between vigorous physical activity, body mass index (BMI), and cardiorespiratory fitness on symptoms of depression and their subsequent direct and indirect effects on quality of life (QoL). Methods: Five hundred and seve...

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Published in: Quality of Life Research
ISSN: 0962-9343 1573-2649
Published: 2018
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URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa40690
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spelling 2018-09-04T10:03:08.9421972 v2 40690 2018-06-11 The association between physical activity, fitness and body mass index on mental well-being and quality of life in adolescents 062f5697ff59f004bc8c713955988398 0000-0003-0813-7477 Melitta McNarry Melitta McNarry true false 6d62b2ed126961bed81a94a2beba8a01 0000-0001-5618-0803 Gareth Stratton Gareth Stratton true false bdb20e3f31bcccf95c7bc116070c4214 0000-0003-0355-6357 Kelly Mackintosh Kelly Mackintosh true false 2018-06-11 STSC Purpose: The purpose of the current study was to investigate the mediatory role between vigorous physical activity, body mass index (BMI), and cardiorespiratory fitness on symptoms of depression and their subsequent direct and indirect effects on quality of life (QoL). Methods: Five hundred and seventy-six adolescents’ (314 boys, 12.5 ± 1.1 years) physical activity levels, cardiorespiratory fitness, BMI, levels of depressive symptoms, and QoL were measured. Structural equation modelling was used to evaluate the difference in linear structural associations between variables. Results: The model suggested that cardiorespiratory fitness (β = 0.16, p < 0.001) and symptoms of depression (β = − 0.52, p < 0.001) were both directly associated with physical QoL, with depressive symptoms also directly influencing psychological QoL (β = − 0.79, p < 0.01). Body mass index was indirectly associated with physical QoL, mediated by both symptoms of depression (β = − 0.06, p < 0.001) and cardiorespiratory fitness (β = 0.05, p < 0.001) and psychological QoL mediated by symptoms of depression (β = − 0.09, p < 0.001). Vigorous physical activity was indirectly associated with QoL, mediated by cardiorespiratory fitness (β = − 0.04, p < 0.001). Conclusions: Models suggested that vigorous physical activity, cardiorespiratory fitness and BMI were associated, both directly and indirectly, with mental well-being and QoL. It could, therefore, be postulated that enhancing cardiorespiratory fitness and BMI through increasing vigorous physical activity may be beneficial to both mental well-being and QoL in adolescents. Journal Article Quality of Life Research 27 9 2313 2320 0962-9343 1573-2649 31 12 2018 2018-12-31 10.1007/s11136-018-1915-3 COLLEGE NANME Sport and Exercise Sciences COLLEGE CODE STSC Swansea University 2018-09-04T10:03:08.9421972 2018-06-11T08:54:51.3787920 College of Engineering Sports Science William T. B. Eddolls 1 Melitta McNarry 0000-0003-0813-7477 2 Leanne Lester 3 Charles O. N. Winn 4 Gareth Stratton 0000-0001-5618-0803 5 Kelly Mackintosh 0000-0003-0355-6357 6 0040690-20062018154926.pdf eddolls2018(2).pdf 2018-06-20T15:49:26.1170000 Output 804565 application/pdf Version of Record true 2018-06-20T00:00:00.0000000 true eng
title The association between physical activity, fitness and body mass index on mental well-being and quality of life in adolescents
spellingShingle The association between physical activity, fitness and body mass index on mental well-being and quality of life in adolescents
Melitta, McNarry
Gareth, Stratton
Kelly, Mackintosh
title_short The association between physical activity, fitness and body mass index on mental well-being and quality of life in adolescents
title_full The association between physical activity, fitness and body mass index on mental well-being and quality of life in adolescents
title_fullStr The association between physical activity, fitness and body mass index on mental well-being and quality of life in adolescents
title_full_unstemmed The association between physical activity, fitness and body mass index on mental well-being and quality of life in adolescents
title_sort The association between physical activity, fitness and body mass index on mental well-being and quality of life in adolescents
author_id_str_mv 062f5697ff59f004bc8c713955988398
6d62b2ed126961bed81a94a2beba8a01
bdb20e3f31bcccf95c7bc116070c4214
author_id_fullname_str_mv 062f5697ff59f004bc8c713955988398_***_Melitta, McNarry
6d62b2ed126961bed81a94a2beba8a01_***_Gareth, Stratton
bdb20e3f31bcccf95c7bc116070c4214_***_Kelly, Mackintosh
author Melitta, McNarry
Gareth, Stratton
Kelly, Mackintosh
author2 William T. B. Eddolls
Melitta McNarry
Leanne Lester
Charles O. N. Winn
Gareth Stratton
Kelly Mackintosh
format Journal article
container_title Quality of Life Research
container_volume 27
container_issue 9
container_start_page 2313
publishDate 2018
institution Swansea University
issn 0962-9343
1573-2649
doi_str_mv 10.1007/s11136-018-1915-3
college_str College of Engineering
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hierarchy_top_title College of Engineering
hierarchy_parent_id collegeofengineering
hierarchy_parent_title College of Engineering
department_str Sports Science{{{_:::_}}}College of Engineering{{{_:::_}}}Sports Science
document_store_str 1
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description Purpose: The purpose of the current study was to investigate the mediatory role between vigorous physical activity, body mass index (BMI), and cardiorespiratory fitness on symptoms of depression and their subsequent direct and indirect effects on quality of life (QoL). Methods: Five hundred and seventy-six adolescents’ (314 boys, 12.5 ± 1.1 years) physical activity levels, cardiorespiratory fitness, BMI, levels of depressive symptoms, and QoL were measured. Structural equation modelling was used to evaluate the difference in linear structural associations between variables. Results: The model suggested that cardiorespiratory fitness (β = 0.16, p < 0.001) and symptoms of depression (β = − 0.52, p < 0.001) were both directly associated with physical QoL, with depressive symptoms also directly influencing psychological QoL (β = − 0.79, p < 0.01). Body mass index was indirectly associated with physical QoL, mediated by both symptoms of depression (β = − 0.06, p < 0.001) and cardiorespiratory fitness (β = 0.05, p < 0.001) and psychological QoL mediated by symptoms of depression (β = − 0.09, p < 0.001). Vigorous physical activity was indirectly associated with QoL, mediated by cardiorespiratory fitness (β = − 0.04, p < 0.001). Conclusions: Models suggested that vigorous physical activity, cardiorespiratory fitness and BMI were associated, both directly and indirectly, with mental well-being and QoL. It could, therefore, be postulated that enhancing cardiorespiratory fitness and BMI through increasing vigorous physical activity may be beneficial to both mental well-being and QoL in adolescents.
published_date 2018-12-31T04:00:07Z
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