No Cover Image

Journal article 418 views 53 downloads

A critical role of hydrogen sulfide evolution during MOCVD of single phase thin film tin sulfide using ditertiarybutylsulfide as a less toxic precursor

Andrew Clayton Orcid Logo, Cecile Charbonneau Orcid Logo, Peter J. Siderfin, Stuart Irvine Orcid Logo

MRS Advances, Volume: 3, Issue: 32, Pages: 1849 - 1853

Swansea University Authors: Andrew Clayton Orcid Logo, Cecile Charbonneau Orcid Logo, Stuart Irvine Orcid Logo

Check full text

DOI (Published version): 10.1557/adv.2018.239

Abstract

Thin film tin sulphide (SnS) was deposited on to molybdenum (Mo) substrates using metal organic chemical vapor deposition at 470°C using tetraethyltin and ditertiarybutylsulfide as precursors. In situ mass spectroscopy was used to study the exhaust gas species downstream of the reaction zone. The pr...

Full description

Published in: MRS Advances
ISSN: 2059-8521
Published: 2018
Online Access: Check full text

URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa40702
Tags: Add Tag
No Tags, Be the first to tag this record!
first_indexed 2018-06-13T19:34:03Z
last_indexed 2019-07-12T21:16:14Z
id cronfa40702
recordtype SURis
fullrecord <?xml version="1.0"?><rfc1807><datestamp>2019-07-12T15:28:17.6871210</datestamp><bib-version>v2</bib-version><id>40702</id><entry>2018-06-13</entry><title>A critical role of hydrogen sulfide evolution during MOCVD of single phase thin film tin sulfide using ditertiarybutylsulfide as a less toxic precursor</title><swanseaauthors><author><sid>cdef4ab8032ae2213a97638baac8176f</sid><ORCID>0000-0002-1540-0440</ORCID><firstname>Andrew</firstname><surname>Clayton</surname><name>Andrew Clayton</name><active>true</active><ethesisStudent>false</ethesisStudent></author><author><sid>4dc059714847cb22ed922ab058950560</sid><ORCID>0000-0001-9887-2007</ORCID><firstname>Cecile</firstname><surname>Charbonneau</surname><name>Cecile Charbonneau</name><active>true</active><ethesisStudent>false</ethesisStudent></author><author><sid>1ddb966eccef99aa96e87f1ea4917f1f</sid><ORCID>0000-0002-1652-4496</ORCID><firstname>Stuart</firstname><surname>Irvine</surname><name>Stuart Irvine</name><active>true</active><ethesisStudent>false</ethesisStudent></author></swanseaauthors><date>2018-06-13</date><deptcode>MTLS</deptcode><abstract>Thin film tin sulphide (SnS) was deposited on to molybdenum (Mo) substrates using metal organic chemical vapor deposition at 470&#xB0;C using tetraethyltin and ditertiarybutylsulfide as precursors. In situ mass spectroscopy was used to study the exhaust gas species downstream of the reaction zone. The precursor vapor carrier gas was either nitrogen or hydrogen, thin film SnS only forming when the latter was used. Mass spectroscopy determined that hydrogen sulfide was being produced and playing a critical role in the vapor phase reaction process and adsorption of tin and sulfur on to the Mo surface. As-grown grain sizes were determined by scanning electron microscopy and were observed to be large averaging around 2 microns across. X-ray diffraction showed the films to be single phase SnS without any parasitic Sn2S3 or SnS2 phases, with a small amount of MoS2 also being detected.</abstract><type>Journal Article</type><journal>MRS Advances</journal><volume>3</volume><journalNumber>32</journalNumber><paginationStart>1849</paginationStart><paginationEnd>1853</paginationEnd><publisher/><issnElectronic>2059-8521</issnElectronic><keywords/><publishedDay>31</publishedDay><publishedMonth>12</publishedMonth><publishedYear>2018</publishedYear><publishedDate>2018-12-31</publishedDate><doi>10.1557/adv.2018.239</doi><url/><notes/><college>COLLEGE NANME</college><department>Materials Science and Engineering</department><CollegeCode>COLLEGE CODE</CollegeCode><DepartmentCode>MTLS</DepartmentCode><institution>Swansea University</institution><apcterm/><lastEdited>2019-07-12T15:28:17.6871210</lastEdited><Created>2018-06-13T13:18:47.8252155</Created><path><level id="1">College of Engineering</level><level id="2">Engineering</level></path><authors><author><firstname>Andrew</firstname><surname>Clayton</surname><orcid>0000-0002-1540-0440</orcid><order>1</order></author><author><firstname>Cecile</firstname><surname>Charbonneau</surname><orcid>0000-0001-9887-2007</orcid><order>2</order></author><author><firstname>Peter J.</firstname><surname>Siderfin</surname><order>3</order></author><author><firstname>Stuart</firstname><surname>Irvine</surname><orcid>0000-0002-1652-4496</orcid><order>4</order></author></authors><documents><document><filename>0040702-15062018111411.pdf</filename><originalFilename>clayton2018(2).pdf</originalFilename><uploaded>2018-06-15T11:14:11.4770000</uploaded><type>Output</type><contentLength>607343</contentLength><contentType>application/pdf</contentType><version>Accepted Manuscript</version><cronfaStatus>true</cronfaStatus><embargoDate>2019-02-26T00:00:00.0000000</embargoDate><copyrightCorrect>true</copyrightCorrect><language>eng</language></document></documents><OutputDurs/></rfc1807>
spelling 2019-07-12T15:28:17.6871210 v2 40702 2018-06-13 A critical role of hydrogen sulfide evolution during MOCVD of single phase thin film tin sulfide using ditertiarybutylsulfide as a less toxic precursor cdef4ab8032ae2213a97638baac8176f 0000-0002-1540-0440 Andrew Clayton Andrew Clayton true false 4dc059714847cb22ed922ab058950560 0000-0001-9887-2007 Cecile Charbonneau Cecile Charbonneau true false 1ddb966eccef99aa96e87f1ea4917f1f 0000-0002-1652-4496 Stuart Irvine Stuart Irvine true false 2018-06-13 MTLS Thin film tin sulphide (SnS) was deposited on to molybdenum (Mo) substrates using metal organic chemical vapor deposition at 470°C using tetraethyltin and ditertiarybutylsulfide as precursors. In situ mass spectroscopy was used to study the exhaust gas species downstream of the reaction zone. The precursor vapor carrier gas was either nitrogen or hydrogen, thin film SnS only forming when the latter was used. Mass spectroscopy determined that hydrogen sulfide was being produced and playing a critical role in the vapor phase reaction process and adsorption of tin and sulfur on to the Mo surface. As-grown grain sizes were determined by scanning electron microscopy and were observed to be large averaging around 2 microns across. X-ray diffraction showed the films to be single phase SnS without any parasitic Sn2S3 or SnS2 phases, with a small amount of MoS2 also being detected. Journal Article MRS Advances 3 32 1849 1853 2059-8521 31 12 2018 2018-12-31 10.1557/adv.2018.239 COLLEGE NANME Materials Science and Engineering COLLEGE CODE MTLS Swansea University 2019-07-12T15:28:17.6871210 2018-06-13T13:18:47.8252155 College of Engineering Engineering Andrew Clayton 0000-0002-1540-0440 1 Cecile Charbonneau 0000-0001-9887-2007 2 Peter J. Siderfin 3 Stuart Irvine 0000-0002-1652-4496 4 0040702-15062018111411.pdf clayton2018(2).pdf 2018-06-15T11:14:11.4770000 Output 607343 application/pdf Accepted Manuscript true 2019-02-26T00:00:00.0000000 true eng
title A critical role of hydrogen sulfide evolution during MOCVD of single phase thin film tin sulfide using ditertiarybutylsulfide as a less toxic precursor
spellingShingle A critical role of hydrogen sulfide evolution during MOCVD of single phase thin film tin sulfide using ditertiarybutylsulfide as a less toxic precursor
Andrew, Clayton
Cecile, Charbonneau
Stuart, Irvine
title_short A critical role of hydrogen sulfide evolution during MOCVD of single phase thin film tin sulfide using ditertiarybutylsulfide as a less toxic precursor
title_full A critical role of hydrogen sulfide evolution during MOCVD of single phase thin film tin sulfide using ditertiarybutylsulfide as a less toxic precursor
title_fullStr A critical role of hydrogen sulfide evolution during MOCVD of single phase thin film tin sulfide using ditertiarybutylsulfide as a less toxic precursor
title_full_unstemmed A critical role of hydrogen sulfide evolution during MOCVD of single phase thin film tin sulfide using ditertiarybutylsulfide as a less toxic precursor
title_sort A critical role of hydrogen sulfide evolution during MOCVD of single phase thin film tin sulfide using ditertiarybutylsulfide as a less toxic precursor
author_id_str_mv cdef4ab8032ae2213a97638baac8176f
4dc059714847cb22ed922ab058950560
1ddb966eccef99aa96e87f1ea4917f1f
author_id_fullname_str_mv cdef4ab8032ae2213a97638baac8176f_***_Andrew, Clayton_***_0000-0002-1540-0440
4dc059714847cb22ed922ab058950560_***_Cecile, Charbonneau_***_0000-0001-9887-2007
1ddb966eccef99aa96e87f1ea4917f1f_***_Stuart, Irvine_***_0000-0002-1652-4496
author Andrew, Clayton
Cecile, Charbonneau
Stuart, Irvine
author2 Andrew Clayton
Cecile Charbonneau
Peter J. Siderfin
Stuart Irvine
format Journal article
container_title MRS Advances
container_volume 3
container_issue 32
container_start_page 1849
publishDate 2018
institution Swansea University
issn 2059-8521
doi_str_mv 10.1557/adv.2018.239
college_str College of Engineering
hierarchytype
hierarchy_top_id collegeofengineering
hierarchy_top_title College of Engineering
hierarchy_parent_id collegeofengineering
hierarchy_parent_title College of Engineering
department_str Engineering{{{_:::_}}}College of Engineering{{{_:::_}}}Engineering
document_store_str 1
active_str 0
description Thin film tin sulphide (SnS) was deposited on to molybdenum (Mo) substrates using metal organic chemical vapor deposition at 470°C using tetraethyltin and ditertiarybutylsulfide as precursors. In situ mass spectroscopy was used to study the exhaust gas species downstream of the reaction zone. The precursor vapor carrier gas was either nitrogen or hydrogen, thin film SnS only forming when the latter was used. Mass spectroscopy determined that hydrogen sulfide was being produced and playing a critical role in the vapor phase reaction process and adsorption of tin and sulfur on to the Mo surface. As-grown grain sizes were determined by scanning electron microscopy and were observed to be large averaging around 2 microns across. X-ray diffraction showed the films to be single phase SnS without any parasitic Sn2S3 or SnS2 phases, with a small amount of MoS2 also being detected.
published_date 2018-12-31T04:03:42Z
_version_ 1722716649279193088
score 10.852431