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The representation of colour in episodic object memory: Evidence from a recognition-induced forgetting paradigm. / Kate Elizabeth Williams

Swansea University Author: Kate Elizabeth Williams

Abstract

Empirical evidence suggesting colour influences object recognition is mixed; leading to conclusions that colour may not always be represented in object memory. Positive evidence for the representation of colour in episodic object memory is often complicated by the possibility that encoding specifici...

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Published: 2014
Institution: Swansea University
Degree level: Doctoral
Degree name: Ph.D
URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa42652
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spelling 2018-08-17T09:58:41.4714769 v2 42652 2018-08-02 The representation of colour in episodic object memory: Evidence from a recognition-induced forgetting paradigm. f67d1a1c3dba1912eb627061a97c2591 NULL Kate Elizabeth Williams Kate Elizabeth Williams true true 2018-08-02 Empirical evidence suggesting colour influences object recognition is mixed; leading to conclusions that colour may not always be represented in object memory. Positive evidence for the representation of colour in episodic object memory is often complicated by the possibility that encoding specificity may be responsible for such observations. The current thesis examined whether colour is represented and makes an independent contribution of shape in episodic memory for familiar and novel objects, using a modified paradigm based on the typical retrieval- practice task (e.g., Anderson, Bjork, & Bjork, 1994). Participants studied pictures of objects, presented one at a time. In a subsequent practice phase, participants either performed Old/New recognition with a subset of the studied objects and their distractors (Experiments 1-7), or they rated a subset of the studied objects for attractiveness, complexity, and usefulness (Experiments 8 and 9). The critical manipulation concerned the nature of unpracticed objects. Unpracticed objects shared either shape only (Rp- Shape), colour only (Rp-Colour), both shape and colour (Rp-Both), or neither shape nor colour (Rp-Neither), with the practiced objects. Interference effects in memory between practiced and unpracticed items are revealed m the forgetting of related unpracticed items - retrieval-induced forgetting (RIF). If both shape and colour information is explicit in the object representations in episodic memory, then there would be significant RIF for unpracticed objects sharing shape only and colour only with the practiced objects. RIF was significant for Rp-Shape and Rp-Colour objects, suggesting that shape and colour are represented and independently drive competition effects in episodic object memory. The use of RIF to probe those representations improves on previous evidence, because it bypasses alternative encoding specificity explanations. The current work provides proof of concept for a modified retrieval-practice paradigm and establishes it as a tool to probe feature- based representations that do not easily lend themselves to retrieval practice. E-Thesis Cognitive psychology. 31 12 2014 2014-12-31 COLLEGE NANME Psychology COLLEGE CODE Swansea University Doctoral Ph.D 2018-08-17T09:58:41.4714769 2018-08-02T16:24:29.9929983 College of Human and Health Sciences Psychology Kate Elizabeth Williams NULL 1 0042652-02082018162511.pdf 10805428.pdf 2018-08-02T16:25:11.3030000 Output 11784677 application/pdf E-Thesis true 2018-08-02T16:25:11.3030000 false
title The representation of colour in episodic object memory: Evidence from a recognition-induced forgetting paradigm.
spellingShingle The representation of colour in episodic object memory: Evidence from a recognition-induced forgetting paradigm.
Kate Elizabeth Williams
title_short The representation of colour in episodic object memory: Evidence from a recognition-induced forgetting paradigm.
title_full The representation of colour in episodic object memory: Evidence from a recognition-induced forgetting paradigm.
title_fullStr The representation of colour in episodic object memory: Evidence from a recognition-induced forgetting paradigm.
title_full_unstemmed The representation of colour in episodic object memory: Evidence from a recognition-induced forgetting paradigm.
title_sort The representation of colour in episodic object memory: Evidence from a recognition-induced forgetting paradigm.
author_id_str_mv f67d1a1c3dba1912eb627061a97c2591
author_id_fullname_str_mv f67d1a1c3dba1912eb627061a97c2591_***_Kate Elizabeth Williams
author Kate Elizabeth Williams
author2 Kate Elizabeth Williams
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publishDate 2014
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college_str College of Human and Health Sciences
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hierarchy_top_title College of Human and Health Sciences
hierarchy_parent_id collegeofhumanandhealthsciences
hierarchy_parent_title College of Human and Health Sciences
department_str Psychology{{{_:::_}}}College of Human and Health Sciences{{{_:::_}}}Psychology
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description Empirical evidence suggesting colour influences object recognition is mixed; leading to conclusions that colour may not always be represented in object memory. Positive evidence for the representation of colour in episodic object memory is often complicated by the possibility that encoding specificity may be responsible for such observations. The current thesis examined whether colour is represented and makes an independent contribution of shape in episodic memory for familiar and novel objects, using a modified paradigm based on the typical retrieval- practice task (e.g., Anderson, Bjork, & Bjork, 1994). Participants studied pictures of objects, presented one at a time. In a subsequent practice phase, participants either performed Old/New recognition with a subset of the studied objects and their distractors (Experiments 1-7), or they rated a subset of the studied objects for attractiveness, complexity, and usefulness (Experiments 8 and 9). The critical manipulation concerned the nature of unpracticed objects. Unpracticed objects shared either shape only (Rp- Shape), colour only (Rp-Colour), both shape and colour (Rp-Both), or neither shape nor colour (Rp-Neither), with the practiced objects. Interference effects in memory between practiced and unpracticed items are revealed m the forgetting of related unpracticed items - retrieval-induced forgetting (RIF). If both shape and colour information is explicit in the object representations in episodic memory, then there would be significant RIF for unpracticed objects sharing shape only and colour only with the practiced objects. RIF was significant for Rp-Shape and Rp-Colour objects, suggesting that shape and colour are represented and independently drive competition effects in episodic object memory. The use of RIF to probe those representations improves on previous evidence, because it bypasses alternative encoding specificity explanations. The current work provides proof of concept for a modified retrieval-practice paradigm and establishes it as a tool to probe feature- based representations that do not easily lend themselves to retrieval practice.
published_date 2014-12-31T03:56:25Z
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score 10.898149