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Retrieval-induced forgetting and memory for actions. /

Swansea University Author: Worth, Eleri Rhian

Abstract

Previous research has demonstrated a retrieval-induced forgetting effect for verbal material (Anderson & Spellman, 1995), colours and shapes (Ciranni & Shimamura,1999), eyewitness testimony (MacLeod, 2002), and images of novel actions (Koutstaal et al., 1999). However, little research has be...

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Published: 2011
Institution: Swansea University
Degree level: Doctoral
Degree name: Ph.D
URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa43182
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Abstract: Previous research has demonstrated a retrieval-induced forgetting effect for verbal material (Anderson & Spellman, 1995), colours and shapes (Ciranni & Shimamura,1999), eyewitness testimony (MacLeod, 2002), and images of novel actions (Koutstaal et al., 1999). However, little research has been conducted into retrieval-induced forgetting and self-performed actions. A recent study by Sharman (2011) demonstrated retrieval-induced forgetting for familiar and bizarre self-performed actions. The current thesis aims to examine retrieval-induced forgetting and actions including self-performed and observed actions, and combinations of self-performed and observed actions. The first experiment demonstrated retrieval-induced forgetting for novel motor sequences. In addition, retrieval-induced forgetting was also found for less novel actions (Experiments 3 and 4) for both typical and non-typical self-performed actions (Experiment 3) and memorable self-performed actions (Experiment 4). Experiment 2 demonstrated a retrieval-induced forgetting effect for objects associated with actions suggesting that retrieval-induced forgetting effects occur both for the action and the object. However the findings of experiment 5 suggest that retrieval-induced forgetting may not occur for goal-orientated actions. These experiments may suggest that retrieval-induced forgetting occurs for non goal-orientated actions, but may not occur for goal-orientated actions. These findings are discussed in terms of the inhibitory account.
Keywords: Goal-orientated actions
College: College of Human and Health Sciences