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Changing Faces: Identifying Complex Behavioural Profiles / Giles Oatley; Tom Crick

Human Aspects of Information Security, Privacy, and Trust, Volume: 8533, Pages: 282 - 293

Swansea University Author: Crick, Tom

Abstract

There has been significant interest in the identification and profiling of insider threats, attracting high-profile policy focus and strategic research funding from governments and funding bodies. Recent examples attracting worldwide attention include the cases of Chelsea Manning, Edward Snowden and...

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Published in: Human Aspects of Information Security, Privacy, and Trust
ISBN: 978-3-319-07619-5 978-3-319-07620-1
ISSN: 0302-9743 1611-3349
Published: Heraklion, Crete, Greece Springer 2014
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URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa43388
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spelling 2018-10-15T14:54:23Z v2 43388 2018-08-14 Changing Faces: Identifying Complex Behavioural Profiles Tom Crick Tom Crick true 0000-0001-5196-9389 false 200c66ef0fc55391f736f6e926fb4b99 9971fd6d74987b78a0d7fce128f8c721 z93Ri4T5hwMLTfh+6XG11n2HZhUyFASdV1DFdgIIhKs= 2018-08-14 EDUC There has been significant interest in the identification and profiling of insider threats, attracting high-profile policy focus and strategic research funding from governments and funding bodies. Recent examples attracting worldwide attention include the cases of Chelsea Manning, Edward Snowden and the US authorities. The challenges with profiling an individual across a range of activities is that their data footprint will legitimately vary significantly based on time and/or location. The insider threat problem is thus a specific instance of the more general problem of profiling complex behaviours. In this paper, we discuss our preliminary research models relating to profiling complex behaviours and present a set of experiments related to changing roles as viewed through large-scale social network datasets, such as Twitter. We employ psycholinguistic metrics in this work, considering changing roles from the standpoint of a trait-based personality theory. We also present further representations, including an alternative psychological theory (not trait-based), and established techniques for crime modelling, spatio-temporal and graph/network, to investigate within a wider reasoning framework. Chapter in book Human Aspects of Information Security, Privacy, and Trust 8533 282 293 Springer Heraklion, Crete, Greece 978-3-319-07619-5 978-3-319-07620-1 0302-9743 1611-3349 22 6 2014 2014-06-22 10.1007/978-3-319-07620-1_25 https://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007%2F978-3-319-07620-1_25 2nd International Conference on Human Aspects of Information Security, Privacy, and Trust (HAS 2014) College of Arts and Humanities School of Education CAAH EDUC None 2018-10-15T14:54:23Z 2018-08-14T15:45:03Z College of Science Computer Science Giles Oatley 1 Tom Crick 0000-0001-5196-9389 2 0043388-03092018090728.pdf has2014.pdf 2018-09-03T09:07:28Z Output 716147 application/pdf AM true Updated Copyright 15/10/2018 2018-09-03T00:00:00 true eng
title Changing Faces: Identifying Complex Behavioural Profiles
spellingShingle Changing Faces: Identifying Complex Behavioural Profiles
Crick, Tom
title_short Changing Faces: Identifying Complex Behavioural Profiles
title_full Changing Faces: Identifying Complex Behavioural Profiles
title_fullStr Changing Faces: Identifying Complex Behavioural Profiles
title_full_unstemmed Changing Faces: Identifying Complex Behavioural Profiles
title_sort Changing Faces: Identifying Complex Behavioural Profiles
author_id_str_mv 200c66ef0fc55391f736f6e926fb4b99
author_id_fullname_str_mv 200c66ef0fc55391f736f6e926fb4b99_***_Crick, Tom
author Crick, Tom
author2 Giles Oatley
Tom Crick
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container_title Human Aspects of Information Security, Privacy, and Trust
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publishDate 2014
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issn 0302-9743
1611-3349
doi_str_mv 10.1007/978-3-319-07620-1_25
publisher Springer
college_str College of Science
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hierarchy_top_title College of Science
hierarchy_parent_id collegeofscience
hierarchy_parent_title College of Science
department_str Computer Science{{{_:::_}}}College of Science{{{_:::_}}}Computer Science
url https://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007%2F978-3-319-07620-1_25
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description There has been significant interest in the identification and profiling of insider threats, attracting high-profile policy focus and strategic research funding from governments and funding bodies. Recent examples attracting worldwide attention include the cases of Chelsea Manning, Edward Snowden and the US authorities. The challenges with profiling an individual across a range of activities is that their data footprint will legitimately vary significantly based on time and/or location. The insider threat problem is thus a specific instance of the more general problem of profiling complex behaviours. In this paper, we discuss our preliminary research models relating to profiling complex behaviours and present a set of experiments related to changing roles as viewed through large-scale social network datasets, such as Twitter. We employ psycholinguistic metrics in this work, considering changing roles from the standpoint of a trait-based personality theory. We also present further representations, including an alternative psychological theory (not trait-based), and established techniques for crime modelling, spatio-temporal and graph/network, to investigate within a wider reasoning framework.
published_date 2014-06-22T12:12:11Z
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