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Deconstructing Supermarket Intervention Effects on Fruit and Vegetable Consumption in Areas of Limited Retail Access: Evidence from the Seacroft Study / Len Gill, Simon Rudkin

Environment and Planning A: Economy and Space, Volume: 46, Issue: 3, Pages: 649 - 665

Swansea University Author: Simon Rudkin

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DOI (Published version): 10.1068/a45675

Abstract

Existing work on the impact of supermarket interventions in areas of limited retail accessibility, so called food deserts, had focused on average effects. However, the conclusion that average fruit and vegetable intake rises masks an important distributional impact. Taking data from the only before...

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Published in: Environment and Planning A: Economy and Space
ISSN: 0308-518X 1472-3409
Published: 2014
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URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa43660
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first_indexed 2018-09-03T13:51:59Z
last_indexed 2021-01-20T04:05:12Z
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spelling 2021-01-19T10:57:12.1711164 v2 43660 2018-09-03 Deconstructing Supermarket Intervention Effects on Fruit and Vegetable Consumption in Areas of Limited Retail Access: Evidence from the Seacroft Study 93f12293ea6ed07ae8162cf25659c5f2 0000-0001-8622-7318 Simon Rudkin Simon Rudkin true false 2018-09-03 ECON Existing work on the impact of supermarket interventions in areas of limited retail accessibility, so called food deserts, had focused on average effects. However, the conclusion that average fruit and vegetable intake rises masks an important distributional impact. Taking data from the only before and after study of dietary behaviour responses to a new supermarket opening, the Seacroft Intervention Study. Using quantile regression we show that those whose consumption of fruit and vegetables was lowest do not see benefits from the new store, whilst those whose consumption was high before the opening consume significantly more. Average effects are thus dominated by the latter and led to the use of intervention stores in food deserts globally. However, our work shows this may not have benefited the low consumers that it was targeted at. Journal Article Environment and Planning A: Economy and Space 46 3 649 665 0308-518X 1472-3409 1 3 2014 2014-03-01 10.1068/a45675 COLLEGE NANME Economics COLLEGE CODE ECON Swansea University 2021-01-19T10:57:12.1711164 2018-09-03T11:43:54.1082145 School of Management Economics Len Gill 1 Simon Rudkin 0000-0001-8622-7318 2
title Deconstructing Supermarket Intervention Effects on Fruit and Vegetable Consumption in Areas of Limited Retail Access: Evidence from the Seacroft Study
spellingShingle Deconstructing Supermarket Intervention Effects on Fruit and Vegetable Consumption in Areas of Limited Retail Access: Evidence from the Seacroft Study
Simon, Rudkin
title_short Deconstructing Supermarket Intervention Effects on Fruit and Vegetable Consumption in Areas of Limited Retail Access: Evidence from the Seacroft Study
title_full Deconstructing Supermarket Intervention Effects on Fruit and Vegetable Consumption in Areas of Limited Retail Access: Evidence from the Seacroft Study
title_fullStr Deconstructing Supermarket Intervention Effects on Fruit and Vegetable Consumption in Areas of Limited Retail Access: Evidence from the Seacroft Study
title_full_unstemmed Deconstructing Supermarket Intervention Effects on Fruit and Vegetable Consumption in Areas of Limited Retail Access: Evidence from the Seacroft Study
title_sort Deconstructing Supermarket Intervention Effects on Fruit and Vegetable Consumption in Areas of Limited Retail Access: Evidence from the Seacroft Study
author_id_str_mv 93f12293ea6ed07ae8162cf25659c5f2
author_id_fullname_str_mv 93f12293ea6ed07ae8162cf25659c5f2_***_Simon, Rudkin
author Simon, Rudkin
author2 Len Gill
Simon Rudkin
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container_title Environment and Planning A: Economy and Space
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publishDate 2014
institution Swansea University
issn 0308-518X
1472-3409
doi_str_mv 10.1068/a45675
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department_str Economics{{{_:::_}}}School of Management{{{_:::_}}}Economics
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description Existing work on the impact of supermarket interventions in areas of limited retail accessibility, so called food deserts, had focused on average effects. However, the conclusion that average fruit and vegetable intake rises masks an important distributional impact. Taking data from the only before and after study of dietary behaviour responses to a new supermarket opening, the Seacroft Intervention Study. Using quantile regression we show that those whose consumption of fruit and vegetables was lowest do not see benefits from the new store, whilst those whose consumption was high before the opening consume significantly more. Average effects are thus dominated by the latter and led to the use of intervention stores in food deserts globally. However, our work shows this may not have benefited the low consumers that it was targeted at.
published_date 2014-03-01T04:05:02Z
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