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A fully coupled fluid-structure interaction model of the secondary lymphatic valve / John T. Wilson, Lowell T. Edgar, Saurabh Prabhakar, Marc Horner, Raoul van Loon, James E. Moore

Computer Methods in Biomechanics and Biomedical Engineering, Pages: 1 - 11

Swansea University Author: Raoul van Loon

Abstract

The secondary lymphatic valve is a bi-leaflet structure frequent throughout collecting vessels that serves to prevent retrograde flow of lymph. Despite its vital function in lymph flow and apparent importance in disease development, the lymphatic valve and its associated fluid dynamics have been lar...

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Published in: Computer Methods in Biomechanics and Biomedical Engineering
ISSN: 1025-5842 1476-8259
Published: 2018
Online Access: Check full text

URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa43794
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Abstract: The secondary lymphatic valve is a bi-leaflet structure frequent throughout collecting vessels that serves to prevent retrograde flow of lymph. Despite its vital function in lymph flow and apparent importance in disease development, the lymphatic valve and its associated fluid dynamics have been largely understudied. The goal of this work was to construct a physiologically relevant computational model of an idealized rat mesenteric lymphatic valve using fully coupled fluid-structure interactions to investigate the relationship between three-dimensional flow patterns and stress/deformation within the valve leaflets. The minimum valve resistance to flow, which has been shown to be an important parameter in effective lymphatic pumping, was computed as 268 g/mm4−s. Hysteretic behavior of the lymphatic valve was confirmed by comparing resistance values for a given transvalvular pressure drop during opening and closing. Furthermore, eddy structures were present within the sinus adjacent to the valve leaflets in what appear to be areas of vortical flow; the eddy structures were characterized by non-zero velocity values (up to ∼4 mm/s) in response to an applied unsteady transvalvular pressure. These modeling capabilities present a useful platform for investigating the complex interplay between soft tissue motion and fluid dynamics of lymphatic valves and contribute to the breadth of knowledge regarding the importance of biomechanics in lymphatic system function.
Keywords: Fluid-structure interactions, fully coupled FSI, lymphatic system, lymphatic valve, lymphatic flow, flow resistance
College: College of Engineering
Start Page: 1
End Page: 11