No Cover Image

Journal article 82 views

IMPOSTER SYNDROME: Why Nurses Question their Competence / Stephanie John

The Nursing times, Volume: 115, Issue: 1, Pages: Awaiting this information - Awaiting this information

Swansea University Author: John, Stephanie

Abstract

“Impostor syndrome” is described as intense feelings of fraudulence and self-doubt in the face of success. The phenomenon was first defined by Clance and Imes (1978), who found that many high achieving women doubt their expertise and feel they have fooled others into believing they are more capable...

Full description

Published in: The Nursing times
ISBN: Awaiting this information
ISSN: 0954-7762
Published: UK The Nursing times. 2019
Online Access: Check full text

URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa44419
Tags: Add Tag
No Tags, Be the first to tag this record!
Abstract: “Impostor syndrome” is described as intense feelings of fraudulence and self-doubt in the face of success. The phenomenon was first defined by Clance and Imes (1978), who found that many high achieving women doubt their expertise and feel they have fooled others into believing they are more capable than they are. Success is deemed to be a result of luck, hard work or fooling others, rather than ability. Imposter syndrome is common and is said to have been experienced by seventy percent of the population at some time in their lives. It is particularly common in environments where intellect is central to success. It is unsurprising that the Imposter syndrome therefore thrives in academic contexts.Imposter syndrome therefore often appears when Nurses transition from nursing practice into the world of academia and nurse education. It is however often common among newly qualified Nurses and more experienced nurses who choose to progress within the field. Despite the context, it is known to have destructive effects. It is hoped that this article will resonate with readers, promote awareness and understanding of Imposter Syndrome.
Item Description: This article has recently been accepted by The Nursing times. As this is newly accepted I am currently awaiting a confirmed date for publication.I have however received a confirmation email of its acceptance.Please see below:IMPOSTER SYNDROME: Why Nurses Question their Competence. We are pleased to inform you that your article has been accepted for publication in Nursing Times. We are unable to give you a date for publication but this is normally within six months of acceptance. You will be sent a copy of the magazine shortly after publication (if there are multiple authors this will be sent to the lead author). Please complete and return the enclosed copyright form. This confirms your acceptance of our terms. We will not withhold permission for any reasonable request from you to publish any part of this article in connection with any other work by you, provided the appropriate acknowledgements are given. The editing process will normally raise some queries that we will need you to answer – these will be emailed to you highlighted in the edited version of the manuscript. However, due to tight deadlines involved in producing a weekly magazine we do not send out proofs. If you haven’t already done so, please supply the original data for any graphs, pie charts or tables included in the article, in an Excel spreadsheet if possible. Any photographs should be supplied in JPEG form rather than embedded in the manuscript You will receive an honorarium of £60 around six to eight weeks after the article has appeared in Nursing Times. After we publish your article, you will be sent a blank invoice to complete, so we appreciate if you complete this as soon as you receive it so we can proceed with your payment. If you have any questions regarding the publication process please contact Sarita.DSilva@emap.com We look forward to hearing from you soon. Warm regards,Sarita DsilvaEditorial Co-ordinatorNursing Times
Keywords: Imposter syndrome, Nurses, education, Nurse lecturers, Nurse educators.
College: College of Human and Health Sciences
Issue: 1
Start Page: Awaiting this information
End Page: Awaiting this information