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IMPOSTER SYNDROME: Why Nurses Question their Competence / Stephanie, John

The Nursing times, Volume: 115, Issue: 2, Pages: 23 - 24

Swansea University Author: Stephanie, John

Abstract

“Impostor syndrome” is described as intense feelings of fraudulence and self-doubt in the face of success. The phenomenon was first defined by Clance and Imes (1978), who found that many high achieving women doubt their expertise and feel they have fooled others into believing they are more capable...

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Published in: The Nursing times
ISBN: Awaiting this information
ISSN: 0954-7762
Published: UK The Nursing times. 2019
Online Access: Check full text

URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa44419
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first_indexed 2018-09-19T18:56:52Z
last_indexed 2019-06-12T20:53:02Z
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spelling 2019-06-12T16:07:01.9191246 v2 44419 2018-09-19 IMPOSTER SYNDROME: Why Nurses Question their Competence 644a02fc221524fc3ecaff5841265a9b Stephanie John Stephanie John true false 2018-09-19 HNU “Impostor syndrome” is described as intense feelings of fraudulence and self-doubt in the face of success. The phenomenon was first defined by Clance and Imes (1978), who found that many high achieving women doubt their expertise and feel they have fooled others into believing they are more capable than they are. Success is deemed to be a result of luck, hard work or fooling others, rather than ability. Imposter syndrome is common and is said to have been experienced by seventy percent of the population at some time in their lives. It is particularly common in environments where intellect is central to success. It is unsurprising that the Imposter syndrome therefore thrives in academic contexts.Imposter syndrome therefore often appears when Nurses transition from nursing practice into the world of academia and nurse education. It is however often common among newly qualified Nurses and more experienced nurses who choose to progress within the field. Despite the context, it is known to have destructive effects. It is hoped that this article will resonate with readers, promote awareness and understanding of Imposter Syndrome. Journal Article The Nursing times 115 2 23 24 The Nursing times. UK Awaiting this information 0954-7762 Imposter syndrome, Nurses, education, Nurse lecturers, Nurse educators. 29 1 2019 2019-01-29 https://www.nursingtimes.net/roles/nurse-educators/imposter-syndrome-why-some-of-us-doubt-our-competence/7027586.article?blocktitle=Latest-clinical-articles&contentID=21081 COLLEGE NANME Nursing COLLEGE CODE HNU Swansea University N/A 2019-06-12T16:07:01.9191246 2018-09-19T15:16:35.1150371 College of Human and Health Sciences Nursing Stephanie John 1 0044419-06022019090127.pdf 44419.pdf 2019-02-06T09:01:27.2900000 Output 199409 application/pdf Version of Record true 2019-02-06T00:00:00.0000000 true eng
title IMPOSTER SYNDROME: Why Nurses Question their Competence
spellingShingle IMPOSTER SYNDROME: Why Nurses Question their Competence
Stephanie, John
title_short IMPOSTER SYNDROME: Why Nurses Question their Competence
title_full IMPOSTER SYNDROME: Why Nurses Question their Competence
title_fullStr IMPOSTER SYNDROME: Why Nurses Question their Competence
title_full_unstemmed IMPOSTER SYNDROME: Why Nurses Question their Competence
title_sort IMPOSTER SYNDROME: Why Nurses Question their Competence
author_id_str_mv 644a02fc221524fc3ecaff5841265a9b
author_id_fullname_str_mv 644a02fc221524fc3ecaff5841265a9b_***_Stephanie, John
author Stephanie, John
format Journal article
container_title The Nursing times
container_volume 115
container_issue 2
container_start_page 23
publishDate 2019
institution Swansea University
isbn Awaiting this information
issn 0954-7762
publisher The Nursing times.
college_str College of Human and Health Sciences
hierarchytype
hierarchy_top_id collegeofhumanandhealthsciences
hierarchy_top_title College of Human and Health Sciences
hierarchy_parent_id collegeofhumanandhealthsciences
hierarchy_parent_title College of Human and Health Sciences
department_str Nursing{{{_:::_}}}College of Human and Health Sciences{{{_:::_}}}Nursing
url https://www.nursingtimes.net/roles/nurse-educators/imposter-syndrome-why-some-of-us-doubt-our-competence/7027586.article?blocktitle=Latest-clinical-articles&contentID=21081
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description “Impostor syndrome” is described as intense feelings of fraudulence and self-doubt in the face of success. The phenomenon was first defined by Clance and Imes (1978), who found that many high achieving women doubt their expertise and feel they have fooled others into believing they are more capable than they are. Success is deemed to be a result of luck, hard work or fooling others, rather than ability. Imposter syndrome is common and is said to have been experienced by seventy percent of the population at some time in their lives. It is particularly common in environments where intellect is central to success. It is unsurprising that the Imposter syndrome therefore thrives in academic contexts.Imposter syndrome therefore often appears when Nurses transition from nursing practice into the world of academia and nurse education. It is however often common among newly qualified Nurses and more experienced nurses who choose to progress within the field. Despite the context, it is known to have destructive effects. It is hoped that this article will resonate with readers, promote awareness and understanding of Imposter Syndrome.
published_date 2019-01-29T04:07:43Z
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