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Imposter syndrome: why some of us doubt our competence / Stephanie, John

Nursing Times, Volume: 115, Issue: 2, Pages: 23 - 24

Swansea University Author: Stephanie, John

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Abstract

“The Impostor Phenomenon” or “Impostor syndrome” is described as intense feelings of fraudulence and self-doubt in the face of success (Clance & Imes, 1978). The phenomenon was first defined by Clance and Imes (1978), who established that many high achieving women doubt their expertise and feel...

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Published in: Nursing Times
ISBN: 0954-7762
ISSN: 0954-7762
Published: 2019
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URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa46068
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first_indexed 2018-11-24T20:19:54Z
last_indexed 2019-07-24T21:24:36Z
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spelling 2019-07-24T16:07:52.7807953 v2 46068 2018-11-24 Imposter syndrome: why some of us doubt our competence 644a02fc221524fc3ecaff5841265a9b Stephanie John Stephanie John true false 2018-11-24 HNU “The Impostor Phenomenon” or “Impostor syndrome” is described as intense feelings of fraudulence and self-doubt in the face of success (Clance & Imes, 1978). The phenomenon was first defined by Clance and Imes (1978), who established that many high achieving women doubt their expertise and feel they have fooled others into believing they are more capable than they are. Rather than being attributed to ability, success is deemed to be a result of external factors such as luck, hard work or fooling others into overestimating competence (Clance & Imes, 1978; Mount, 2015). The Impostor Phenomenon is pervasive and is said to have been experienced by seventy percent of the population at some time in their lives (Gravois, 2007; Mount & Tardanico, 2014). This pervasiveness is particularly apparent in environments where intellect is central to credibility and success. It is therefore unsurprising that the Impostor Phenomenon thrives in academic contexts (Kets de Vries, 2005; Siriwardena, 2013).This thesis provides a reflective Auto-ethnographic exploration of the Impostor Phenomenon associated with the transition from Nursing practice into the prestigious world of Nurse education. The main objective is to establish the implications of the Impostor Phenomenon on educational practice and to identify whether professional identity, the academic context and gender are contributory.Achieving an authentic insight improves the potential to provide management recommendations for the Impostor Phenomenon (Sherman, 2013). This is of particular interest given its prominence and potentially destructive nature (Hutchins, 2015). The Impostor Phenomenon is associated with poor student evaluations and directly influences employee performance and retention. Exploration of the phenomenon related to educational practice is therefore of particular relevance (Hutchins, 2015; Zorn, 2005).The Auto-ethnography aims to alter perceptions, inform the present and reshape the future of my educational practice (Custer, 2014; Sykes, 2014). It is also hoped that it will resonate with readers, promote awareness and generate understanding related to the profound nature, implications and contributory factors of the Impostor Phenomenon (Ellis, 2007; Muncey, 2011) Journal Article Nursing Times 115 2 23 24 0954-7762 0954-7762 Imposter syndrome. Academia. University. Professional identity. Gender. 28 2 2019 2019-02-28 https://www.nursingtimes.net/roles/nurse-educators/imposter-syndrome-why-some-of-us-doubt-our-competence/7027586.article COLLEGE NANME Nursing COLLEGE CODE HNU Swansea University 2019-07-24T16:07:52.7807953 2018-11-24T17:47:22.6598806 College of Human and Health Sciences Nursing Stephanie John 1
title Imposter syndrome: why some of us doubt our competence
spellingShingle Imposter syndrome: why some of us doubt our competence
Stephanie, John
title_short Imposter syndrome: why some of us doubt our competence
title_full Imposter syndrome: why some of us doubt our competence
title_fullStr Imposter syndrome: why some of us doubt our competence
title_full_unstemmed Imposter syndrome: why some of us doubt our competence
title_sort Imposter syndrome: why some of us doubt our competence
author_id_str_mv 644a02fc221524fc3ecaff5841265a9b
author_id_fullname_str_mv 644a02fc221524fc3ecaff5841265a9b_***_Stephanie, John
author Stephanie, John
format Journal article
container_title Nursing Times
container_volume 115
container_issue 2
container_start_page 23
publishDate 2019
institution Swansea University
isbn 0954-7762
issn 0954-7762
college_str College of Human and Health Sciences
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hierarchy_top_id collegeofhumanandhealthsciences
hierarchy_top_title College of Human and Health Sciences
hierarchy_parent_id collegeofhumanandhealthsciences
hierarchy_parent_title College of Human and Health Sciences
department_str Nursing{{{_:::_}}}College of Human and Health Sciences{{{_:::_}}}Nursing
url https://www.nursingtimes.net/roles/nurse-educators/imposter-syndrome-why-some-of-us-doubt-our-competence/7027586.article
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description “The Impostor Phenomenon” or “Impostor syndrome” is described as intense feelings of fraudulence and self-doubt in the face of success (Clance & Imes, 1978). The phenomenon was first defined by Clance and Imes (1978), who established that many high achieving women doubt their expertise and feel they have fooled others into believing they are more capable than they are. Rather than being attributed to ability, success is deemed to be a result of external factors such as luck, hard work or fooling others into overestimating competence (Clance & Imes, 1978; Mount, 2015). The Impostor Phenomenon is pervasive and is said to have been experienced by seventy percent of the population at some time in their lives (Gravois, 2007; Mount & Tardanico, 2014). This pervasiveness is particularly apparent in environments where intellect is central to credibility and success. It is therefore unsurprising that the Impostor Phenomenon thrives in academic contexts (Kets de Vries, 2005; Siriwardena, 2013).This thesis provides a reflective Auto-ethnographic exploration of the Impostor Phenomenon associated with the transition from Nursing practice into the prestigious world of Nurse education. The main objective is to establish the implications of the Impostor Phenomenon on educational practice and to identify whether professional identity, the academic context and gender are contributory.Achieving an authentic insight improves the potential to provide management recommendations for the Impostor Phenomenon (Sherman, 2013). This is of particular interest given its prominence and potentially destructive nature (Hutchins, 2015). The Impostor Phenomenon is associated with poor student evaluations and directly influences employee performance and retention. Exploration of the phenomenon related to educational practice is therefore of particular relevance (Hutchins, 2015; Zorn, 2005).The Auto-ethnography aims to alter perceptions, inform the present and reshape the future of my educational practice (Custer, 2014; Sykes, 2014). It is also hoped that it will resonate with readers, promote awareness and generate understanding related to the profound nature, implications and contributory factors of the Impostor Phenomenon (Ellis, 2007; Muncey, 2011)
published_date 2019-02-28T04:06:52Z
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