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Exploring synchronous, remote collaborative interaction between learners using multi-touch tables and video conferencing in UK primary schools / Gary Beauchamp; Andrew Joyce-Gibbons; James Mc Naughton; Nick Young; Tom Crick

British Journal of Educational Technology

Swansea University Author: Crick, Tom

  • Accepted Manuscript under embargo until: 11th July 2020

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DOI (Published version): 10.1111/bjet.12728

Abstract

This study explores remote, non-collocated collaboration via multi-touch table (SynergyNet) and video conferencing software (Skype). Twenty-four participants (aged 10-11 years) in two locations -- primary school classrooms located 300 miles apart in the UK -- engaged in simultaneous collaborative ac...

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Published in: British Journal of Educational Technology
ISSN: 00071013
Published: Wiley 2019
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URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa46173
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first_indexed 2018-11-30T14:22:30Z
last_indexed 2019-04-18T12:05:08Z
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spelling 2019-04-16T12:03:42Z v2 46173 2018-11-30 Exploring synchronous, remote collaborative interaction between learners using multi-touch tables and video conferencing in UK primary schools Tom Crick Tom Crick true 0000-0001-5196-9389 false 200c66ef0fc55391f736f6e926fb4b99 9971fd6d74987b78a0d7fce128f8c721 z93Ri4T5hwMLTfh+6XG11n2HZhUyFASdV1DFdgIIhKs= 2018-11-30 EDUC This study explores remote, non-collocated collaboration via multi-touch table (SynergyNet) and video conferencing software (Skype). Twenty-four participants (aged 10-11 years) in two locations -- primary school classrooms located 300 miles apart in the UK -- engaged in simultaneous collaborative activity to solve a History mystery task. Audio-video data recorded in the first minute of the activity was analysed to explore the emergence of collaborative working practices both within groups in the same location (resizing for shared reading) and between the groups communicating via video conferencing software and through the ‘flick’ multi-touch gesture (sharing clues between groups). Results indicated that most groups focused first on the establishment of intra-group collaboration before reaching out to their remotely located partners. However, when the second data set was analysed, audio data from interviews conducted seven months after the original study, participants reported that the discussion between groups supported by the ‘flick’ gesture were the most important and memorable features of the activity. The study relates these findings to existing literature on collaborative learning using multi-touch tables and considers how teachers are best able to help support the emergence of collaborative practices. Journal article British Journal of Educational Technology Wiley 00071013 Multi-touch, Collaboration, Co-location, Primary education, Computer-supported collaborative learning 0 0 2019 2019-01-01 10.1111/bjet.12728 https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/bjet.12728 College of Arts and Humanities School of Education CAAH EDUC None None 2019-04-16T12:03:42Z 2018-11-30T09:45:59Z College of Arts and Humanities School of Education Gary Beauchamp 1 Andrew Joyce-Gibbons 2 James Mc Naughton 3 Nick Young 4 Tom Crick 5 Under embargo Under embargo 2019-01-31T10:05:25Z Output 1242222 application/pdf AM true Published to Cronfa 31/01/2019 2020-07-11T00:00:00 true eng
title Exploring synchronous, remote collaborative interaction between learners using multi-touch tables and video conferencing in UK primary schools
spellingShingle Exploring synchronous, remote collaborative interaction between learners using multi-touch tables and video conferencing in UK primary schools
Crick, Tom
title_short Exploring synchronous, remote collaborative interaction between learners using multi-touch tables and video conferencing in UK primary schools
title_full Exploring synchronous, remote collaborative interaction between learners using multi-touch tables and video conferencing in UK primary schools
title_fullStr Exploring synchronous, remote collaborative interaction between learners using multi-touch tables and video conferencing in UK primary schools
title_full_unstemmed Exploring synchronous, remote collaborative interaction between learners using multi-touch tables and video conferencing in UK primary schools
title_sort Exploring synchronous, remote collaborative interaction between learners using multi-touch tables and video conferencing in UK primary schools
author_id_str_mv 200c66ef0fc55391f736f6e926fb4b99
author_id_fullname_str_mv 200c66ef0fc55391f736f6e926fb4b99_***_Crick, Tom
author Crick, Tom
author2 Gary Beauchamp
Andrew Joyce-Gibbons
James Mc Naughton
Nick Young
Tom Crick
format Journal article
container_title British Journal of Educational Technology
publishDate 2019
institution Swansea University
issn 00071013
doi_str_mv 10.1111/bjet.12728
publisher Wiley
college_str College of Arts and Humanities
hierarchytype
hierarchy_top_id collegeofartsandhumanities
hierarchy_top_title College of Arts and Humanities
hierarchy_parent_id collegeofartsandhumanities
hierarchy_parent_title College of Arts and Humanities
department_str School of Education{{{_:::_}}}College of Arts and Humanities{{{_:::_}}}School of Education
url https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/bjet.12728
document_store_str 0
active_str 1
description This study explores remote, non-collocated collaboration via multi-touch table (SynergyNet) and video conferencing software (Skype). Twenty-four participants (aged 10-11 years) in two locations -- primary school classrooms located 300 miles apart in the UK -- engaged in simultaneous collaborative activity to solve a History mystery task. Audio-video data recorded in the first minute of the activity was analysed to explore the emergence of collaborative working practices both within groups in the same location (resizing for shared reading) and between the groups communicating via video conferencing software and through the ‘flick’ multi-touch gesture (sharing clues between groups). Results indicated that most groups focused first on the establishment of intra-group collaboration before reaching out to their remotely located partners. However, when the second data set was analysed, audio data from interviews conducted seven months after the original study, participants reported that the discussion between groups supported by the ‘flick’ gesture were the most important and memorable features of the activity. The study relates these findings to existing literature on collaborative learning using multi-touch tables and considers how teachers are best able to help support the emergence of collaborative practices.
published_date 2019-01-01T13:56:38Z
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score 10.808875