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The Institute of Coding: A University-Industry Collaboration to Address the UK Digital Skills Crisis

James H. Davenport, Rachid Hourizi, Tom Crick Orcid Logo

Proceedings of the 50th ACM Technical Symposium on Computer Science Education

Swansea University Author: Tom Crick Orcid Logo

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DOI (Published version): 10.1145/3287324.3293834

Abstract

The UK is not the only country with a serious digital skills crisis, but it is one with a formal Government inquiry (The Shadbolt Report) and response. It also has very detailed tracking of people into, through and out of higher education into employment. The Institute of Coding (https://instituteof...

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Published in: Proceedings of the 50th ACM Technical Symposium on Computer Science Education
ISBN: 978-1-4503-5890-3
Published: New York, NY, USA ACM 2019
URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa58311
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Abstract: The UK is not the only country with a serious digital skills crisis, but it is one with a formal Government inquiry (The Shadbolt Report) and response. It also has very detailed tracking of people into, through and out of higher education into employment. The Institute of Coding (https://instituteofcoding.org/) is a new £40m+ initiative by the UK Government to transform the digital skills profile of England. It responds to the apparently contradictory data that the country has a digital skills shortage across a variety of sectors, yet has unemployed computing graduates every year. The Institute is a large-scale national intervention funded by Government, industry and universities to address some of the perceived issues with formal education versus industry skills and training, for example: technical skills versus soft skills, industry-readiness versus "deep education", and managing expectations for the diverse digital, data and computational skills demands of employers across a wide range of economic sectors. Its work ranges from the development of specialist, in-demand digital skills to the provision of work experience, employability skills and ensuring work-readiness of computing graduates, and the provision of digital skills for those from a non-digital background. It is also addressing under-representation and under-achievement by a variety of groups, notably women (only 16% of university students) but also ethnic minorities and other groups.
College: College of Arts and Humanities