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Aesthetic labouring and the female entrepreneur: ‘Entrepreneurship that wouldn’t chip your nails’ / Katrina Pritchard, Kate Mackenzie Davey, Helen Cooper

International Small Business Journal: Researching Entrepreneurship, Volume: 37, Issue: 4, Pages: 343 - 364

Swansea University Author: Katrina Pritchard

Abstract

Recognising significant interrelations between neoliberal and postfeminist discourses, we advance understandings of constructions of female entrepreneurs by unpacking their visual representation and exploring the role of aesthetic labour. Given the impact of contemporary media, we focus on key image...

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Published in: International Small Business Journal: Researching Entrepreneurship
ISSN: 0266-2426 1741-2870
Published: 2019
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URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa47919
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first_indexed 2018-12-10T14:27:20Z
last_indexed 2021-01-20T04:08:28Z
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spelling 2021-01-19T11:09:03.5438636 v2 47919 2018-12-10 Aesthetic labouring and the female entrepreneur: ‘Entrepreneurship that wouldn’t chip your nails’ a8b44bc7c6f2fa716a6b19916af6e3ff 0000-0003-1938-1272 Katrina Pritchard Katrina Pritchard true false 2018-12-10 BBU Recognising significant interrelations between neoliberal and postfeminist discourses, we advance understandings of constructions of female entrepreneurs by unpacking their visual representation and exploring the role of aesthetic labour. Given the impact of contemporary media, we focus on key images integral to the marketing of Mattel’s Entrepreneur Barbie as a postfeminist ‘cultural motif’ (Duffy et al., 2017: 262) and investigate how these representations of female entrepreneurship are consumed. First, we highlight the practical demands and emotional risks of the aesthetic labour required to achieve such postfeminist glamour. Second, links between conventional femininity and entrepreneurial success are both celebrated and challenged, highlighting perceived limits to achievement. Finally, we unpack understandings of the relations between entrepreneurialism and aesthetic labour to move beyond assumptions of the instrumental power of the makeover. Our findings thus, enrich understandings of the consumption of postfeminist images of entrepreneurs. Journal Article International Small Business Journal: Researching Entrepreneurship 37 4 343 364 0266-2426 1741-2870 Postfeminism; aesthetic labour; visual research, gender 1 6 2019 2019-06-01 10.1177/0266242618823408 http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0266242618823408 COLLEGE NANME Business COLLEGE CODE BBU Swansea University 2021-01-19T11:09:03.5438636 2018-12-10T09:45:21.7983287 School of Management School of Management Katrina Pritchard 0000-0003-1938-1272 1 Kate Mackenzie Davey 2 Helen Cooper 3 0047919-10122018105350.pdf FINALAesthetic_labour_and_the_female_entrepreneur.pdf 2018-12-10T10:53:50.8270000 Output 925824 application/pdf Accepted Manuscript true 2019-02-07T00:00:00.0000000 true eng
title Aesthetic labouring and the female entrepreneur: ‘Entrepreneurship that wouldn’t chip your nails’
spellingShingle Aesthetic labouring and the female entrepreneur: ‘Entrepreneurship that wouldn’t chip your nails’
Katrina, Pritchard
title_short Aesthetic labouring and the female entrepreneur: ‘Entrepreneurship that wouldn’t chip your nails’
title_full Aesthetic labouring and the female entrepreneur: ‘Entrepreneurship that wouldn’t chip your nails’
title_fullStr Aesthetic labouring and the female entrepreneur: ‘Entrepreneurship that wouldn’t chip your nails’
title_full_unstemmed Aesthetic labouring and the female entrepreneur: ‘Entrepreneurship that wouldn’t chip your nails’
title_sort Aesthetic labouring and the female entrepreneur: ‘Entrepreneurship that wouldn’t chip your nails’
author_id_str_mv a8b44bc7c6f2fa716a6b19916af6e3ff
author_id_fullname_str_mv a8b44bc7c6f2fa716a6b19916af6e3ff_***_Katrina, Pritchard
author Katrina, Pritchard
author2 Katrina Pritchard
Kate Mackenzie Davey
Helen Cooper
format Journal article
container_title International Small Business Journal: Researching Entrepreneurship
container_volume 37
container_issue 4
container_start_page 343
publishDate 2019
institution Swansea University
issn 0266-2426
1741-2870
doi_str_mv 10.1177/0266242618823408
college_str School of Management
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hierarchy_top_title School of Management
hierarchy_parent_id schoolofmanagement
hierarchy_parent_title School of Management
department_str School of Management{{{_:::_}}}School of Management{{{_:::_}}}School of Management
url http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0266242618823408
document_store_str 1
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description Recognising significant interrelations between neoliberal and postfeminist discourses, we advance understandings of constructions of female entrepreneurs by unpacking their visual representation and exploring the role of aesthetic labour. Given the impact of contemporary media, we focus on key images integral to the marketing of Mattel’s Entrepreneur Barbie as a postfeminist ‘cultural motif’ (Duffy et al., 2017: 262) and investigate how these representations of female entrepreneurship are consumed. First, we highlight the practical demands and emotional risks of the aesthetic labour required to achieve such postfeminist glamour. Second, links between conventional femininity and entrepreneurial success are both celebrated and challenged, highlighting perceived limits to achievement. Finally, we unpack understandings of the relations between entrepreneurialism and aesthetic labour to move beyond assumptions of the instrumental power of the makeover. Our findings thus, enrich understandings of the consumption of postfeminist images of entrepreneurs.
published_date 2019-06-01T04:08:14Z
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score 10.83191