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Predictable gene expression related to behavioral variation in parenting

Kyle M Benowitz, Elizabeth C McKinney, Christopher B Cunningham, Allen J Moore, Chris Cunningham Orcid Logo

Behavioral Ecology, Volume: 30, Issue: 2, Pages: 402 - 407

Swansea University Author: Chris Cunningham Orcid Logo

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DOI (Published version): 10.1093/beheco/ary179

Abstract

Differential gene expression has been associated with transitions between behavioral states for a wide variety of organisms and behaviors. Heterochrony, genetic toolkits, and predictable pathways underlying behavioral transitions have been hypothesized to explain the relationship between transcripti...

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Published in: Behavioral Ecology
ISSN: 1045-2249 1465-7279
Published: 2018
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URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa48268
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spelling 2020-07-01T13:33:07.9117973 v2 48268 2019-01-17 Predictable gene expression related to behavioral variation in parenting 0bd688baf9fc30cb39dfae9ed28cb662 0000-0003-3965-2076 Chris Cunningham Chris Cunningham true false 2019-01-17 SBI Differential gene expression has been associated with transitions between behavioral states for a wide variety of organisms and behaviors. Heterochrony, genetic toolkits, and predictable pathways underlying behavioral transitions have been hypothesized to explain the relationship between transcription and behavioral changes. Less studied is how variation in transcription is related to variation within a behavior, and if the genes that are associated with this variation are predictable. Here, we adopt an evolutionary systems biology perspective to address 2 hypotheses relating differential expression to changes within and between behavior. We predicted fewer genes will be associated with variation within a behavior than with transitions between states, and the genes underlying variation within a behavior will represent a narrower set of biological functions. We tested for associations with parenting variation within a state with a set of genes known a priori to be differentially expressed (DE) between parenting states in the burying beetle Nicrophorus vespilloides. As predicted, we found that far fewer genes are DE related to variation within parenting. Moreover, these were not randomly distributed among categories or pathways in the gene set we tested and primarily involved genes associated with neurotransmission. We suggest that this means candidate genes will be easier to identify for associations within a behavior, as descriptions of behavioral state may include more than a single phenotype. Journal Article Behavioral Ecology 30 2 402 407 1045-2249 1465-7279 behavior genetics, evolutionary systems biology, gene expression, Nicrophorus vespilloides, parental care 26 12 2018 2018-12-26 10.1093/beheco/ary179 https://academic.oup.com/beheco/advance-article/doi/10.1093/beheco/ary179/5261351 COLLEGE NANME Biosciences COLLEGE CODE SBI Swansea University 2020-07-01T13:33:07.9117973 2019-01-17T14:45:35.5907968 Kyle M Benowitz 1 Elizabeth C McKinney 2 Christopher B Cunningham 3 Allen J Moore 4 Chris Cunningham 0000-0003-3965-2076 5 0048268-17012019144610.pdf BB,HiLowParent,PredGE,acceptedcopy;Benowitz(2018).pdf 2019-01-17T14:46:10.3370000 Output 432266 application/pdf Accepted Manuscript true 2019-12-26T00:00:00.0000000 true eng
title Predictable gene expression related to behavioral variation in parenting
spellingShingle Predictable gene expression related to behavioral variation in parenting
Chris Cunningham
title_short Predictable gene expression related to behavioral variation in parenting
title_full Predictable gene expression related to behavioral variation in parenting
title_fullStr Predictable gene expression related to behavioral variation in parenting
title_full_unstemmed Predictable gene expression related to behavioral variation in parenting
title_sort Predictable gene expression related to behavioral variation in parenting
author_id_str_mv 0bd688baf9fc30cb39dfae9ed28cb662
author_id_fullname_str_mv 0bd688baf9fc30cb39dfae9ed28cb662_***_Chris Cunningham
author Chris Cunningham
author2 Kyle M Benowitz
Elizabeth C McKinney
Christopher B Cunningham
Allen J Moore
Chris Cunningham
format Journal article
container_title Behavioral Ecology
container_volume 30
container_issue 2
container_start_page 402
publishDate 2018
institution Swansea University
issn 1045-2249
1465-7279
doi_str_mv 10.1093/beheco/ary179
url https://academic.oup.com/beheco/advance-article/doi/10.1093/beheco/ary179/5261351
document_store_str 1
active_str 0
description Differential gene expression has been associated with transitions between behavioral states for a wide variety of organisms and behaviors. Heterochrony, genetic toolkits, and predictable pathways underlying behavioral transitions have been hypothesized to explain the relationship between transcription and behavioral changes. Less studied is how variation in transcription is related to variation within a behavior, and if the genes that are associated with this variation are predictable. Here, we adopt an evolutionary systems biology perspective to address 2 hypotheses relating differential expression to changes within and between behavior. We predicted fewer genes will be associated with variation within a behavior than with transitions between states, and the genes underlying variation within a behavior will represent a narrower set of biological functions. We tested for associations with parenting variation within a state with a set of genes known a priori to be differentially expressed (DE) between parenting states in the burying beetle Nicrophorus vespilloides. As predicted, we found that far fewer genes are DE related to variation within parenting. Moreover, these were not randomly distributed among categories or pathways in the gene set we tested and primarily involved genes associated with neurotransmission. We suggest that this means candidate genes will be easier to identify for associations within a behavior, as descriptions of behavioral state may include more than a single phenotype.
published_date 2018-12-26T04:00:59Z
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