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Thermal treatment of Himalayan balsam: Tar and biochar analysis / Peter, Holliman; Geraint, Sullivan

Bioresource Technology Reports, Volume: 5, Pages: 164 - 169

Swansesa University Authors: Peter, Holliman, Geraint, Sullivan

Abstract

The practicality of Himalayan balsam as an alternative biomass material was considered throughout this investigation. However, due to the materials high-water content, thermal efficiency during pyrolysis was compromised as extra energy was required to remove free and bound water. A simple solution w...

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Published in: Bioresource Technology Reports
ISSN: 2589014X
Published: 2019
Online Access: Check full text

URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa48283
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Abstract: The practicality of Himalayan balsam as an alternative biomass material was considered throughout this investigation. However, due to the materials high-water content, thermal efficiency during pyrolysis was compromised as extra energy was required to remove free and bound water. A simple solution which involved drying at ambient temperature in air, significantly lowered the moisture content, (65% reduction) this resulted in an increase in the bulk density of the material and lowering the thermal energy input of the process. The thermal decomposition process at 300–400 °C generated petroleum like compound; a mixture of volatile aromatic, linear and branched alkanes, and therefore a possible source for replenishment of hydrocarbon-based fuel. The solid remaining carbon generated (~35% mass of dry material) termed biochar showed adsorption properties to rhodamine B dye. The level of activity was increased upon activation using phosphoric acid. The activated biochar could be a promising adsorbent used to remove aqueous organic compounds. The thermal treatment of Himalayan balsam has potential in generating useful products such as bio-fuels and biochar.
Keywords: Pyrolysis, Activated biochar, Biomass recycling, Thermal treatment, Bio-oil, Himalayan balsam
College: College of Engineering
Start Page: 164
End Page: 169