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Thermal treatment of Himalayan balsam: Tar and biochar analysis

G.L. Sullivan, P.J. Holliman, Peter Holliman Orcid Logo, Geraint Sullivan

Bioresource Technology Reports, Volume: 5, Pages: 164 - 169

Swansea University Authors: Peter Holliman Orcid Logo, Geraint Sullivan

Abstract

The practicality of Himalayan balsam as an alternative biomass material was considered throughout this investigation. However, due to the materials high-water content, thermal efficiency during pyrolysis was compromised as extra energy was required to remove free and bound water. A simple solution w...

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Published in: Bioresource Technology Reports
ISSN: 2589014X
Published: 2019
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URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa48283
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first_indexed 2019-01-18T14:01:34Z
last_indexed 2019-03-11T14:00:15Z
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spelling 2019-03-11T10:42:41.3540203 v2 48283 2019-01-18 Thermal treatment of Himalayan balsam: Tar and biochar analysis c8f52394d776279c9c690dc26066ddf9 0000-0002-9911-8513 Peter Holliman Peter Holliman true false 3d9d9e2d27827cb652dd719deb20c28a Geraint Sullivan Geraint Sullivan true false 2019-01-18 MTLS The practicality of Himalayan balsam as an alternative biomass material was considered throughout this investigation. However, due to the materials high-water content, thermal efficiency during pyrolysis was compromised as extra energy was required to remove free and bound water. A simple solution which involved drying at ambient temperature in air, significantly lowered the moisture content, (65% reduction) this resulted in an increase in the bulk density of the material and lowering the thermal energy input of the process. The thermal decomposition process at 300–400 °C generated petroleum like compound; a mixture of volatile aromatic, linear and branched alkanes, and therefore a possible source for replenishment of hydrocarbon-based fuel. The solid remaining carbon generated (~35% mass of dry material) termed biochar showed adsorption properties to rhodamine B dye. The level of activity was increased upon activation using phosphoric acid. The activated biochar could be a promising adsorbent used to remove aqueous organic compounds. The thermal treatment of Himalayan balsam has potential in generating useful products such as bio-fuels and biochar. Journal Article Bioresource Technology Reports 5 164 169 2589014X Pyrolysis, Activated biochar, Biomass recycling, Thermal treatment, Bio-oil, Himalayan balsam 31 12 2019 2019-12-31 10.1016/j.biteb.2019.01.007 COLLEGE NANME Materials Science and Engineering COLLEGE CODE MTLS Swansea University 2019-03-11T10:42:41.3540203 2019-01-18T10:07:49.7067378 College of Engineering Engineering G.L. Sullivan 1 P.J. Holliman 2 Peter Holliman 0000-0002-9911-8513 3 Geraint Sullivan 4 0048283-18012019101308.pdf sullivan2019v2.pdf 2019-01-18T10:13:08.4630000 Output 9209812 application/pdf Accepted Manuscript true 2020-01-14T00:00:00.0000000 true eng
title Thermal treatment of Himalayan balsam: Tar and biochar analysis
spellingShingle Thermal treatment of Himalayan balsam: Tar and biochar analysis
Peter Holliman
Geraint Sullivan
title_short Thermal treatment of Himalayan balsam: Tar and biochar analysis
title_full Thermal treatment of Himalayan balsam: Tar and biochar analysis
title_fullStr Thermal treatment of Himalayan balsam: Tar and biochar analysis
title_full_unstemmed Thermal treatment of Himalayan balsam: Tar and biochar analysis
title_sort Thermal treatment of Himalayan balsam: Tar and biochar analysis
author_id_str_mv c8f52394d776279c9c690dc26066ddf9
3d9d9e2d27827cb652dd719deb20c28a
author_id_fullname_str_mv c8f52394d776279c9c690dc26066ddf9_***_Peter Holliman
3d9d9e2d27827cb652dd719deb20c28a_***_Geraint Sullivan
author Peter Holliman
Geraint Sullivan
author2 G.L. Sullivan
P.J. Holliman
Peter Holliman
Geraint Sullivan
format Journal article
container_title Bioresource Technology Reports
container_volume 5
container_start_page 164
publishDate 2019
institution Swansea University
issn 2589014X
doi_str_mv 10.1016/j.biteb.2019.01.007
college_str College of Engineering
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hierarchy_top_title College of Engineering
hierarchy_parent_id collegeofengineering
hierarchy_parent_title College of Engineering
department_str Engineering{{{_:::_}}}College of Engineering{{{_:::_}}}Engineering
document_store_str 1
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description The practicality of Himalayan balsam as an alternative biomass material was considered throughout this investigation. However, due to the materials high-water content, thermal efficiency during pyrolysis was compromised as extra energy was required to remove free and bound water. A simple solution which involved drying at ambient temperature in air, significantly lowered the moisture content, (65% reduction) this resulted in an increase in the bulk density of the material and lowering the thermal energy input of the process. The thermal decomposition process at 300–400 °C generated petroleum like compound; a mixture of volatile aromatic, linear and branched alkanes, and therefore a possible source for replenishment of hydrocarbon-based fuel. The solid remaining carbon generated (~35% mass of dry material) termed biochar showed adsorption properties to rhodamine B dye. The level of activity was increased upon activation using phosphoric acid. The activated biochar could be a promising adsorbent used to remove aqueous organic compounds. The thermal treatment of Himalayan balsam has potential in generating useful products such as bio-fuels and biochar.
published_date 2019-12-31T04:01:00Z
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score 10.887841