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Can Wearable Cameras be Used to Validate School-Aged Children’s Lifestyle Behaviours? / Bethan Everson, Kelly Mackintosh, Melitta McNarry, Charlotte Todd, Gareth Stratton

Children, Volume: 6, Issue: 2, Start page: 20

Swansea University Authors: Kelly Mackintosh, Melitta McNarry, Gareth Stratton

Abstract

Wearable cameras combined with accelerometers have been used to estimate the accuracy of children’s self-report of physical activity, health-related behaviours, and the contexts in which they occur. There were two aims to this study; the first was to validate questions regarding self-reported health...

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Published in: Children
ISSN: 2227-9067
Published: MDPI AG 2019
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URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa48650
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spelling 2020-10-19T13:38:25.0504524 v2 48650 2019-01-30 Can Wearable Cameras be Used to Validate School-Aged Children’s Lifestyle Behaviours? bdb20e3f31bcccf95c7bc116070c4214 0000-0003-0355-6357 Kelly Mackintosh Kelly Mackintosh true false 062f5697ff59f004bc8c713955988398 0000-0003-0813-7477 Melitta McNarry Melitta McNarry true false 6d62b2ed126961bed81a94a2beba8a01 0000-0001-5618-0803 Gareth Stratton Gareth Stratton true false 2019-01-30 STSC Wearable cameras combined with accelerometers have been used to estimate the accuracy of children’s self-report of physical activity, health-related behaviours, and the contexts in which they occur. There were two aims to this study; the first was to validate questions regarding self-reported health and lifestyle behaviours in 9–11-year-old children using the child’s health and activity tool (CHAT), an accelerometer and a wearable camera. Second, the study sought to evaluate ethical challenges associated with taking regular photographs using a wearable camera through interviews with children and their families. Fourteen children wore an autographer and hip-worn triaxial accelerometer for the waking hours of one school and one weekend day. For both of these days, children self-reported their behaviours chronologically and sequentially using the CHAT. Data were examined using limits of agreement and percentage agreement to verify if reference methods aligned with self-reported behaviours. Six parent–child dyads participated in interviews. Seven, five, and nine items demonstrated good, acceptable, and poor validity, respectively. This demonstrates that the accuracy of children’s recall varies according to the behaviour or item being measured. This is the first study to trial the use of wearable cameras in assessing the concurrent validity of children’s physical activity and behaviour recall, as almost all other studies have used parent proxy reports alongside accelerometers. Wearable cameras carry some ethical and technical challenges, which were examined in this study. Parents and children reported that the autographer was burdensome and in a few cases invaded privacy. This study demonstrates the importance of adhering to an ethical framework. Journal Article Children 6 2 20 MDPI AG 2227-9067 wearable cameras; autographer; child’s health and activity tool (CHAT); health and lifestyle behaviours; parent-child dyad; observation; self-report; previous day recall 31 12 2019 2019-12-31 10.3390/children6020020 COLLEGE NANME Sport and Exercise Sciences COLLEGE CODE STSC Swansea University 2020-10-19T13:38:25.0504524 2019-01-30T15:04:14.9588972 College of Engineering Sports Science Bethan Everson 1 Kelly Mackintosh 0000-0003-0355-6357 2 Melitta McNarry 0000-0003-0813-7477 3 Charlotte Todd 4 Gareth Stratton 0000-0001-5618-0803 5 0048650-12022019154221.pdf everson2019(2)v2.pdf 2019-02-12T15:42:21.7170000 Output 17371238 application/pdf Version of Record true 2019-02-12T00:00:00.0000000 true eng
title Can Wearable Cameras be Used to Validate School-Aged Children’s Lifestyle Behaviours?
spellingShingle Can Wearable Cameras be Used to Validate School-Aged Children’s Lifestyle Behaviours?
Kelly, Mackintosh
Melitta, McNarry
Gareth, Stratton
title_short Can Wearable Cameras be Used to Validate School-Aged Children’s Lifestyle Behaviours?
title_full Can Wearable Cameras be Used to Validate School-Aged Children’s Lifestyle Behaviours?
title_fullStr Can Wearable Cameras be Used to Validate School-Aged Children’s Lifestyle Behaviours?
title_full_unstemmed Can Wearable Cameras be Used to Validate School-Aged Children’s Lifestyle Behaviours?
title_sort Can Wearable Cameras be Used to Validate School-Aged Children’s Lifestyle Behaviours?
author_id_str_mv bdb20e3f31bcccf95c7bc116070c4214
062f5697ff59f004bc8c713955988398
6d62b2ed126961bed81a94a2beba8a01
author_id_fullname_str_mv bdb20e3f31bcccf95c7bc116070c4214_***_Kelly, Mackintosh
062f5697ff59f004bc8c713955988398_***_Melitta, McNarry
6d62b2ed126961bed81a94a2beba8a01_***_Gareth, Stratton
author Kelly, Mackintosh
Melitta, McNarry
Gareth, Stratton
author2 Bethan Everson
Kelly Mackintosh
Melitta McNarry
Charlotte Todd
Gareth Stratton
format Journal article
container_title Children
container_volume 6
container_issue 2
container_start_page 20
publishDate 2019
institution Swansea University
issn 2227-9067
doi_str_mv 10.3390/children6020020
publisher MDPI AG
college_str College of Engineering
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hierarchy_top_id collegeofengineering
hierarchy_top_title College of Engineering
hierarchy_parent_id collegeofengineering
hierarchy_parent_title College of Engineering
department_str Sports Science{{{_:::_}}}College of Engineering{{{_:::_}}}Sports Science
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description Wearable cameras combined with accelerometers have been used to estimate the accuracy of children’s self-report of physical activity, health-related behaviours, and the contexts in which they occur. There were two aims to this study; the first was to validate questions regarding self-reported health and lifestyle behaviours in 9–11-year-old children using the child’s health and activity tool (CHAT), an accelerometer and a wearable camera. Second, the study sought to evaluate ethical challenges associated with taking regular photographs using a wearable camera through interviews with children and their families. Fourteen children wore an autographer and hip-worn triaxial accelerometer for the waking hours of one school and one weekend day. For both of these days, children self-reported their behaviours chronologically and sequentially using the CHAT. Data were examined using limits of agreement and percentage agreement to verify if reference methods aligned with self-reported behaviours. Six parent–child dyads participated in interviews. Seven, five, and nine items demonstrated good, acceptable, and poor validity, respectively. This demonstrates that the accuracy of children’s recall varies according to the behaviour or item being measured. This is the first study to trial the use of wearable cameras in assessing the concurrent validity of children’s physical activity and behaviour recall, as almost all other studies have used parent proxy reports alongside accelerometers. Wearable cameras carry some ethical and technical challenges, which were examined in this study. Parents and children reported that the autographer was burdensome and in a few cases invaded privacy. This study demonstrates the importance of adhering to an ethical framework.
published_date 2019-12-31T04:01:36Z
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