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Lifestyle Behaviors Associated With Body Fat Percent in 9- to 11-Year-Old Children / Nils Swindell, Damon Berridge, Melitta McNarry, Kelly Mackintosh, Lynne M. Boddy, Stuart J. Fairclough, Gareth Stratton

Pediatric Exercise Science, Volume: 33, Issue: 1, Pages: 40 - 47

Swansea University Authors: Nils Swindell, Damon Berridge, Melitta McNarry, Kelly Mackintosh, Gareth Stratton

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DOI (Published version): 10.1123/pes.2020-0010

Abstract

Purpose:To examine (1) associations between body fat percent (BF) and lifestyle behaviors in children aged 9–11 years and (2) the consistency of these associations over a 10-year period. Methods: In this repeat, cross-sectional study, 15,977 children aged 9–11 years completed an anthropometric asses...

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Published in: Pediatric Exercise Science
ISSN: 0899-8493 1543-2920
Published: Human Kinetics 2021
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URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa56865
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Abstract: Purpose:To examine (1) associations between body fat percent (BF) and lifestyle behaviors in children aged 9–11 years and (2) the consistency of these associations over a 10-year period. Methods: In this repeat, cross-sectional study, 15,977 children aged 9–11 years completed an anthropometric assessment and the SportsLinx Lifestyle survey between 2004 and 2013. Body fat was estimated according to the sum of the triceps and subscapular skinfold measurements. Multilevel models were utilized to examine associations between BF and responses to the lifestyle survey while controlling for known covariates. Results: Lifestyle behaviors explained 8.6% of the total variance in body fat. Specifically, negative associations were found between BF and active transport to school ( β = −0.99 [0.19], P < .001), full-fat milk (−0.07 [0.15], P < .001), and sweetened beverage consumption (−0.40 [0.15], P = .007). Relative to the reference group of ≤8:00 PM, later bedtime was positively associated with BF: 8:00 to 8:59 PM ( β = 1.60 [0.26], P < .001); 9:00 to 10:00 PM ( β = 1.04 [0.24], P < .001); ≥10:00 PM ( β = 1.18 [0.30], P < .001). Two-way interactions revealed opposing associations between BF and the consumption of low-calorie beverages for boys ( β = 0.95 [0.25], P < .001) and girls ( β = −0.85 [0.37], P = .021). There was no significant change in these associations over a 10-year period. Conclusions: In this population-level study covering a decade of data collection, lifestyle behaviors were associated with BF. Policies and interventions targeting population-level behavior change, such as active transport to school, sleep time, and consumption of full-fat milk, may offer an opportunity for improvements in BF.
College: College of Engineering
Issue: 1
Start Page: 40
End Page: 47