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Lifestyle Behaviors Associated With Body Fat Percent in 9- to 11-Year-Old Children / Nils Swindell, Damon Berridge, Melitta McNarry, Kelly Mackintosh, Lynne M. Boddy, Stuart J. Fairclough, Gareth Stratton

Pediatric Exercise Science, Volume: 33, Issue: 1, Pages: 40 - 47

Swansea University Authors: Nils Swindell, Damon Berridge, Melitta McNarry, Kelly Mackintosh, Gareth Stratton

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DOI (Published version): 10.1123/pes.2020-0010

Abstract

Purpose:To examine (1) associations between body fat percent (BF) and lifestyle behaviors in children aged 9–11 years and (2) the consistency of these associations over a 10-year period. Methods: In this repeat, cross-sectional study, 15,977 children aged 9–11 years completed an anthropometric asses...

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Published in: Pediatric Exercise Science
ISSN: 0899-8493 1543-2920
Published: Human Kinetics 2021
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URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa56865
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Methods: In this repeat, cross-sectional study, 15,977 children aged 9&#x2013;11 years completed an anthropometric assessment and the SportsLinx Lifestyle survey between 2004 and 2013. Body fat was estimated according to the sum of the triceps and subscapular skinfold measurements. Multilevel models were utilized to examine associations between BF and responses to the lifestyle survey while controlling for known covariates. Results: Lifestyle behaviors explained 8.6% of the total variance in body fat. Specifically, negative associations were found between BF and active transport to school (&#x200A;&#x3B2;&#x2009;=&#x2009;&#x2212;0.99 [0.19], P&#x2009;&lt;&#x2009;.001), full-fat milk (&#x2212;0.07 [0.15], P&#x2009;&lt;&#x2009;.001), and sweetened beverage consumption (&#x2212;0.40 [0.15], P&#x2009;=&#x2009;.007). Relative to the reference group of &#x2264;8:00 PM, later bedtime was positively associated with BF: 8:00 to 8:59 PM (&#x200A;&#x3B2;&#x2009;=&#x2009;1.60 [0.26], P&#x2009;&lt;&#x2009;.001); 9:00 to 10:00 PM (&#x200A;&#x3B2;&#x2009;=&#x2009;1.04 [0.24], P&#x2009;&lt;&#x2009;.001); &#x2265;10:00 PM (&#x200A;&#x3B2;&#x2009;=&#x2009;1.18 [0.30], P&#x2009;&lt;&#x2009;.001). Two-way interactions revealed opposing associations between BF and the consumption of low-calorie beverages for boys (&#x200A;&#x3B2;&#x2009;=&#x2009;0.95 [0.25], P&#x2009;&lt;&#x2009;.001) and girls (&#x200A;&#x3B2;&#x2009;=&#x2009;&#x2212;0.85 [0.37], P&#x2009;=&#x2009;.021). There was no significant change in these associations over a 10-year period. Conclusions: In this population-level study covering a decade of data collection, lifestyle behaviors were associated with BF. Policies and interventions targeting population-level behavior change, such as active transport to school, sleep time, and consumption of full-fat milk, may offer an opportunity for improvements in BF.</abstract><type>Journal Article</type><journal>Pediatric Exercise Science</journal><volume>33</volume><journalNumber>1</journalNumber><paginationStart>40</paginationStart><paginationEnd>47</paginationEnd><publisher>Human Kinetics</publisher><placeOfPublication/><isbnPrint/><isbnElectronic/><issnPrint>0899-8493</issnPrint><issnElectronic>1543-2920</issnElectronic><keywords/><publishedDay>25</publishedDay><publishedMonth>3</publishedMonth><publishedYear>2021</publishedYear><publishedDate>2021-03-25</publishedDate><doi>10.1123/pes.2020-0010</doi><url/><notes/><college>COLLEGE NANME</college><department>Biomedical Engineering</department><CollegeCode>COLLEGE CODE</CollegeCode><DepartmentCode>MEDE</DepartmentCode><institution>Swansea University</institution><apcterm/><lastEdited>2021-05-25T12:27:25.6094668</lastEdited><Created>2021-05-13T14:36:02.1928132</Created><path><level id="1">College of Engineering</level><level id="2">Sports Science</level></path><authors><author><firstname>Nils</firstname><surname>Swindell</surname><order>1</order></author><author><firstname>Damon</firstname><surname>Berridge</surname><orcid>0000-0002-5442-6686</orcid><order>2</order></author><author><firstname>Melitta</firstname><surname>McNarry</surname><orcid>0000-0003-0813-7477</orcid><order>3</order></author><author><firstname>Kelly</firstname><surname>Mackintosh</surname><orcid>0000-0003-0355-6357</orcid><order>4</order></author><author><firstname>Lynne M.</firstname><surname>Boddy</surname><order>5</order></author><author><firstname>Stuart J.</firstname><surname>Fairclough</surname><order>6</order></author><author><firstname>Gareth</firstname><surname>Stratton</surname><orcid>0000-0001-5618-0803</orcid><order>7</order></author></authors><documents><document><filename>56865__19881__488d8e2481d14145a73be25fead26462.pdf</filename><originalFilename>56865.pdf</originalFilename><uploaded>2021-05-13T14:41:23.1492304</uploaded><type>Output</type><contentLength>495060</contentLength><contentType>application/pdf</contentType><version>Accepted Manuscript</version><cronfaStatus>true</cronfaStatus><action/><copyrightCorrect>true</copyrightCorrect><language>eng</language></document></documents><OutputDurs/></rfc1807>
spelling 2021-05-25T12:27:25.6094668 v2 56865 2021-05-13 Lifestyle Behaviors Associated With Body Fat Percent in 9- to 11-Year-Old Children d89a0a3fb118e1cf625fddc68cdf25bb Nils Swindell Nils Swindell true false a3def496492ff026f3228f50fbf89525 0000-0002-5442-6686 Damon Berridge Damon Berridge true false 062f5697ff59f004bc8c713955988398 0000-0003-0813-7477 Melitta McNarry Melitta McNarry true false bdb20e3f31bcccf95c7bc116070c4214 0000-0003-0355-6357 Kelly Mackintosh Kelly Mackintosh true false 6d62b2ed126961bed81a94a2beba8a01 0000-0001-5618-0803 Gareth Stratton Gareth Stratton true false 2021-05-13 MEDE Purpose:To examine (1) associations between body fat percent (BF) and lifestyle behaviors in children aged 9–11 years and (2) the consistency of these associations over a 10-year period. Methods: In this repeat, cross-sectional study, 15,977 children aged 9–11 years completed an anthropometric assessment and the SportsLinx Lifestyle survey between 2004 and 2013. Body fat was estimated according to the sum of the triceps and subscapular skinfold measurements. Multilevel models were utilized to examine associations between BF and responses to the lifestyle survey while controlling for known covariates. Results: Lifestyle behaviors explained 8.6% of the total variance in body fat. Specifically, negative associations were found between BF and active transport to school ( β = −0.99 [0.19], P < .001), full-fat milk (−0.07 [0.15], P < .001), and sweetened beverage consumption (−0.40 [0.15], P = .007). Relative to the reference group of ≤8:00 PM, later bedtime was positively associated with BF: 8:00 to 8:59 PM ( β = 1.60 [0.26], P < .001); 9:00 to 10:00 PM ( β = 1.04 [0.24], P < .001); ≥10:00 PM ( β = 1.18 [0.30], P < .001). Two-way interactions revealed opposing associations between BF and the consumption of low-calorie beverages for boys ( β = 0.95 [0.25], P < .001) and girls ( β = −0.85 [0.37], P = .021). There was no significant change in these associations over a 10-year period. Conclusions: In this population-level study covering a decade of data collection, lifestyle behaviors were associated with BF. Policies and interventions targeting population-level behavior change, such as active transport to school, sleep time, and consumption of full-fat milk, may offer an opportunity for improvements in BF. Journal Article Pediatric Exercise Science 33 1 40 47 Human Kinetics 0899-8493 1543-2920 25 3 2021 2021-03-25 10.1123/pes.2020-0010 COLLEGE NANME Biomedical Engineering COLLEGE CODE MEDE Swansea University 2021-05-25T12:27:25.6094668 2021-05-13T14:36:02.1928132 College of Engineering Sports Science Nils Swindell 1 Damon Berridge 0000-0002-5442-6686 2 Melitta McNarry 0000-0003-0813-7477 3 Kelly Mackintosh 0000-0003-0355-6357 4 Lynne M. Boddy 5 Stuart J. Fairclough 6 Gareth Stratton 0000-0001-5618-0803 7 56865__19881__488d8e2481d14145a73be25fead26462.pdf 56865.pdf 2021-05-13T14:41:23.1492304 Output 495060 application/pdf Accepted Manuscript true true eng
title Lifestyle Behaviors Associated With Body Fat Percent in 9- to 11-Year-Old Children
spellingShingle Lifestyle Behaviors Associated With Body Fat Percent in 9- to 11-Year-Old Children
Nils, Swindell
Damon, Berridge
Melitta, McNarry
Kelly, Mackintosh
Gareth, Stratton
title_short Lifestyle Behaviors Associated With Body Fat Percent in 9- to 11-Year-Old Children
title_full Lifestyle Behaviors Associated With Body Fat Percent in 9- to 11-Year-Old Children
title_fullStr Lifestyle Behaviors Associated With Body Fat Percent in 9- to 11-Year-Old Children
title_full_unstemmed Lifestyle Behaviors Associated With Body Fat Percent in 9- to 11-Year-Old Children
title_sort Lifestyle Behaviors Associated With Body Fat Percent in 9- to 11-Year-Old Children
author_id_str_mv d89a0a3fb118e1cf625fddc68cdf25bb
a3def496492ff026f3228f50fbf89525
062f5697ff59f004bc8c713955988398
bdb20e3f31bcccf95c7bc116070c4214
6d62b2ed126961bed81a94a2beba8a01
author_id_fullname_str_mv d89a0a3fb118e1cf625fddc68cdf25bb_***_Nils, Swindell
a3def496492ff026f3228f50fbf89525_***_Damon, Berridge
062f5697ff59f004bc8c713955988398_***_Melitta, McNarry
bdb20e3f31bcccf95c7bc116070c4214_***_Kelly, Mackintosh
6d62b2ed126961bed81a94a2beba8a01_***_Gareth, Stratton
author Nils, Swindell
Damon, Berridge
Melitta, McNarry
Kelly, Mackintosh
Gareth, Stratton
author2 Nils Swindell
Damon Berridge
Melitta McNarry
Kelly Mackintosh
Lynne M. Boddy
Stuart J. Fairclough
Gareth Stratton
format Journal article
container_title Pediatric Exercise Science
container_volume 33
container_issue 1
container_start_page 40
publishDate 2021
institution Swansea University
issn 0899-8493
1543-2920
doi_str_mv 10.1123/pes.2020-0010
publisher Human Kinetics
college_str College of Engineering
hierarchytype
hierarchy_top_id collegeofengineering
hierarchy_top_title College of Engineering
hierarchy_parent_id collegeofengineering
hierarchy_parent_title College of Engineering
department_str Sports Science{{{_:::_}}}College of Engineering{{{_:::_}}}Sports Science
document_store_str 1
active_str 0
description Purpose:To examine (1) associations between body fat percent (BF) and lifestyle behaviors in children aged 9–11 years and (2) the consistency of these associations over a 10-year period. Methods: In this repeat, cross-sectional study, 15,977 children aged 9–11 years completed an anthropometric assessment and the SportsLinx Lifestyle survey between 2004 and 2013. Body fat was estimated according to the sum of the triceps and subscapular skinfold measurements. Multilevel models were utilized to examine associations between BF and responses to the lifestyle survey while controlling for known covariates. Results: Lifestyle behaviors explained 8.6% of the total variance in body fat. Specifically, negative associations were found between BF and active transport to school ( β = −0.99 [0.19], P < .001), full-fat milk (−0.07 [0.15], P < .001), and sweetened beverage consumption (−0.40 [0.15], P = .007). Relative to the reference group of ≤8:00 PM, later bedtime was positively associated with BF: 8:00 to 8:59 PM ( β = 1.60 [0.26], P < .001); 9:00 to 10:00 PM ( β = 1.04 [0.24], P < .001); ≥10:00 PM ( β = 1.18 [0.30], P < .001). Two-way interactions revealed opposing associations between BF and the consumption of low-calorie beverages for boys ( β = 0.95 [0.25], P < .001) and girls ( β = −0.85 [0.37], P = .021). There was no significant change in these associations over a 10-year period. Conclusions: In this population-level study covering a decade of data collection, lifestyle behaviors were associated with BF. Policies and interventions targeting population-level behavior change, such as active transport to school, sleep time, and consumption of full-fat milk, may offer an opportunity for improvements in BF.
published_date 2021-03-25T04:20:07Z
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