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Arguing about causes in law: a semi-formal framework for causal arguments / Adam, Wyner

Artificial Intelligence and Law, Volume: 28, Issue: 1, Pages: 69 - 89

Swansea University Author: Adam, Wyner

Abstract

In legal argumentation and liability attribution, disputes over causes play a central role. Legal discussions about causation often have difficulty with cause-in-fact in complex situations, e.g. overdetermination, preemption, omission. We first assess three theories of causation. Then we introduce a...

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Published in: Artificial Intelligence and Law
ISSN: 0924-8463 1572-8382
Published: Springer Science and Business Media LLC 2020
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URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa49685
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first_indexed 2019-03-21T13:59:26Z
last_indexed 2020-08-05T03:11:54Z
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spelling 2020-08-04T18:13:06.8609122 v2 49685 2019-03-21 Arguing about causes in law: a semi-formal framework for causal arguments 51fa34a3136b8e81fc273fce73e88099 0000-0002-2958-3428 Adam Wyner Adam Wyner true false 2019-03-21 LAWD In legal argumentation and liability attribution, disputes over causes play a central role. Legal discussions about causation often have difficulty with cause-in-fact in complex situations, e.g. overdetermination, preemption, omission. We first assess three theories of causation. Then we introduce a semi-formal framework to model causal arguments using both strict and defeasible rules. We apply the framework to the Althen vaccine injury case. Wrapping up the paper, we motivate a causal argumentation framework and propose to integrate current theories of causation. Journal Article Artificial Intelligence and Law 28 1 69 89 Springer Science and Business Media LLC 0924-8463 1572-8382 Artificial Intelligence, Legal Reasoning, Defeasible Reasoning 1 3 2020 2020-03-01 10.1007/s10506-019-09246-z http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10506-019-09246-z COLLEGE NANME Legal Studies COLLEGE CODE LAWD Swansea University 2020-08-04T18:13:06.8609122 2019-03-21T10:45:19.5833024 Rūta Liepiņa 1 Giovanni Sartor 2 Adam Wyner 0000-0002-2958-3428 3 0049685-16042019140814.pdf LiepinaSartorWynerArguingaboutCauses(2019).pdf 2019-04-16T14:08:14.1470000 Output 284814 application/pdf Accepted Manuscript true 2020-03-05T00:00:00.0000000 true eng
title Arguing about causes in law: a semi-formal framework for causal arguments
spellingShingle Arguing about causes in law: a semi-formal framework for causal arguments
Adam, Wyner
title_short Arguing about causes in law: a semi-formal framework for causal arguments
title_full Arguing about causes in law: a semi-formal framework for causal arguments
title_fullStr Arguing about causes in law: a semi-formal framework for causal arguments
title_full_unstemmed Arguing about causes in law: a semi-formal framework for causal arguments
title_sort Arguing about causes in law: a semi-formal framework for causal arguments
author_id_str_mv 51fa34a3136b8e81fc273fce73e88099
author_id_fullname_str_mv 51fa34a3136b8e81fc273fce73e88099_***_Adam, Wyner
author Adam, Wyner
format Journal article
container_title Artificial Intelligence and Law
container_volume 28
container_issue 1
container_start_page 69
publishDate 2020
institution Swansea University
issn 0924-8463
1572-8382
doi_str_mv 10.1007/s10506-019-09246-z
publisher Springer Science and Business Media LLC
url http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10506-019-09246-z
document_store_str 1
active_str 0
description In legal argumentation and liability attribution, disputes over causes play a central role. Legal discussions about causation often have difficulty with cause-in-fact in complex situations, e.g. overdetermination, preemption, omission. We first assess three theories of causation. Then we introduce a semi-formal framework to model causal arguments using both strict and defeasible rules. We apply the framework to the Althen vaccine injury case. Wrapping up the paper, we motivate a causal argumentation framework and propose to integrate current theories of causation.
published_date 2020-03-01T04:20:00Z
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score 10.741233