No Cover Image

Journal article 20 views 36 downloads

Light-Induced Reversible DNA Ligation of Gold Nanoparticle Superlattices / Matthew, Burton

ACS Nano

Swansea University Author: Matthew, Burton

  • Light-inducedreversibleDNAligationofgoldnanoparticlesuperlattices.docx

    Microsoft Word | Accepted Manuscript

    This document is the unedited Author’s version of a Submitted Work that was subsequently accepted for publication in ACS Nano, copyright © American Chemical Society after peer review. To access the final edited and published work see https://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/acsnano.9b01294.

    Download (2.6MB)
  • defazio2-19(2).pdf

    PDF | Version of Record

    Distributed under the terms of a Creative Commons Attribution (CC-BY-4.0)

    Download (6.72MB)

Abstract

DNA-mediated self-assembly of nanoparticles has been of great interest because it enables access to nanoparticle superstructures that cannot be synthesized otherwise. However, the programmability of higher order nanoparticle structures can be easily lost under DNA denaturing conditions. Here, we dem...

Full description

Published in: ACS Nano
ISSN: 1936-0851 1936-086X
Published: American Chemical Society 2019
Online Access: Check full text

URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa50091
Tags: Add Tag
No Tags, Be the first to tag this record!
Abstract: DNA-mediated self-assembly of nanoparticles has been of great interest because it enables access to nanoparticle superstructures that cannot be synthesized otherwise. However, the programmability of higher order nanoparticle structures can be easily lost under DNA denaturing conditions. Here, we demonstrate that light can be employed as an external stimulus to master the stability of nanoparticle superlattices (SLs) via the promotion of a reversible photoligation of DNA in SLs. The oligonucleotides attached to the nanoparticles are encoded to ligate using 365 nm light, effectively locking the SLs and rendering them stable under DNA denaturing conditions. The reversible process of unlocking these structures is possible by irradiation with light at 315 nm, recovering the structures to their natural state. Our work inspires an alternative research direction toward postassembly manipulation of nanoparticle superstructures using external stimuli as a tool to enrich the library of additional material forms and their application in different media and environments.
Keywords: DNA, nanoparticles, photochemical ligation, self-assembly, superlattices
College: College of Engineering