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Anti-pseudomonad Activity of Manuka Honey and Antibiotics in a Specialized ex vivo Model Simulating Cystic Fibrosis Lung Infection / Rowena, Jenkins

Frontiers in Microbiology, Volume: 10

Swansea University Author: Rowena, Jenkins

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Abstract

Chronic lung infections involving Pseudomonas aeruginosa in people with cystic fibrosis are common. These infections are often formed of bacteria with high levels of antibiotic resistance which form biofilms within the lung. The limited treatment options for these infections means that new antimicro...

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Published in: Frontiers in Microbiology
ISSN: 1664-302X
Published: 2019
Online Access: Check full text

URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa50103
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Abstract: Chronic lung infections involving Pseudomonas aeruginosa in people with cystic fibrosis are common. These infections are often formed of bacteria with high levels of antibiotic resistance which form biofilms within the lung. The limited treatment options for these infections means that new antimicrobial strategies are required. Manuka honey has been used successfully to treat topical infections in wounds for many years. In this study the potential for manuka honey to inhibit pulmonary isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa alone or in combination with antibiotics was assessed in an ex vivo porcine lung model. Twenty eight strains of Pseudomonas were tested using conventional antibiotic susceptibility testing with ciprofloxacin, ceftazidime and tobramycin as well as in two ex vivo porcine lung models. All the isolates were susceptible to manuka honey using conventional testing where as many of the isolates displayed resistance to the antibiotics tested. In conventional testing where the bacteria are not in biofilms form combining manuka honey and antibiotics had little effect on inhibition. In the ex vivo models where bacteria were in biofilm form (more similar to a chronic lung infection) many of the isolates were not inhibited by antibiotics even at greatly elevated levels but were inhibited by manuka honey. When antibiotics and manuka honey were combined in the ex vivo models the ability to inhibit bacteria was improved in most cases.
Keywords: Pseudomonas aeruginosa, biofilms, antimicrobial susceptibility testing, manuka honey, ex vivo model, cystic fibrosis
College: Swansea University Medical School