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The Role of Mineral and Trace Element Supplementation in Exercise and Athletic Performance: A Systematic Review

Gill Conway Orcid Logo, Shane Heffernan Orcid Logo, Katy Horner, Giuseppe De Vito, Gillian Conway

Nutrients, Volume: 11, Issue: 3, Start page: 696

Swansea University Authors: Gill Conway Orcid Logo, Shane Heffernan Orcid Logo

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DOI (Published version): 10.3390/nu11030696

Abstract

Minerals and trace elements (MTEs) are micronutrients involved in hundreds of biological processes. Deficiency in MTEs can negatively affect athletic performance. Approximately 50% of athletes have reported consuming some form of micronutrient supplement; however, there is limited data confirming th...

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Published in: Nutrients
ISSN: 2072-6643
Published: 2019
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URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa51435
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first_indexed 2019-08-16T15:30:32Z
last_indexed 2019-09-02T20:45:58Z
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fullrecord <?xml version="1.0"?><rfc1807><datestamp>2019-09-02T16:09:41.6393530</datestamp><bib-version>v2</bib-version><id>51435</id><entry>2019-08-16</entry><title>The Role of Mineral and Trace Element Supplementation in Exercise and Athletic Performance: A Systematic Review</title><swanseaauthors><author><sid>e33e0ee5a076ad91fe6615117caa1800</sid><ORCID>0000-0002-5991-0960</ORCID><firstname>Gill</firstname><surname>Conway</surname><name>Gill Conway</name><active>true</active><ethesisStudent>false</ethesisStudent></author><author><sid>72c0b36891dfbec0378c0d0f7916e807</sid><ORCID>0000-0002-3297-9335</ORCID><firstname>Shane</firstname><surname>Heffernan</surname><name>Shane Heffernan</name><active>true</active><ethesisStudent>false</ethesisStudent></author></swanseaauthors><date>2019-08-16</date><deptcode>BMS</deptcode><abstract>Minerals and trace elements (MTEs) are micronutrients involved in hundreds of biological processes. Deficiency in MTEs can negatively affect athletic performance. Approximately 50% of athletes have reported consuming some form of micronutrient supplement; however, there is limited data confirming their efficacy for improving performance. The aim of this study was to systematically review the role of MTEs in exercise and athletic performance. Six electronic databases and grey literature sources (MEDLINE; EMBASE; CINAHL and SportDISCUS; Web of Science and clinicaltrials.gov) were searched, in accordance with PRISMA guidelines. Results: 17,433 articles were identified and 130 experiments from 128 studies were included. Retrieved articles included Iron (n = 29), Calcium (n = 11), Magnesium, (n = 22), Phosphate (n = 17), Zinc (n = 9), Sodium (n = 15), Boron (n = 4), Selenium (n = 5), Chromium (n = 12) and multi-mineral articles (n = 5). No relevant articles were identified for Copper, Manganese, Iodine, Nickel, Fluoride or Cobalt. Only Iron and Magnesium included articles of sufficient quality to be assigned as &#x2018;strong&#x2019;. Currently, there is little evidence to support the use of MTE supplementation to improve physiological markers of athletic performance, with the possible exception of Iron (in particular, biological situations) and Magnesium as these currently have the strongest quality evidence. Regardless, some MTEs may possess the potential to improve athletic performance, but more high quality research is required before support for these MTEs can be given. PROSPERO preregistered (CRD42018090502)</abstract><type>Journal Article</type><journal>Nutrients</journal><volume>11</volume><journalNumber>3</journalNumber><paginationStart>696</paginationStart><publisher/><issnElectronic>2072-6643</issnElectronic><keywords>ergogenic aids; nutritional supplements; physical performance; exercise and sport nutrition; muscle function</keywords><publishedDay>31</publishedDay><publishedMonth>12</publishedMonth><publishedYear>2019</publishedYear><publishedDate>2019-12-31</publishedDate><doi>10.3390/nu11030696</doi><url/><notes/><college>COLLEGE NANME</college><department>Biomedical Sciences</department><CollegeCode>COLLEGE CODE</CollegeCode><DepartmentCode>BMS</DepartmentCode><institution>Swansea University</institution><apcterm/><lastEdited>2019-09-02T16:09:41.6393530</lastEdited><Created>2019-08-16T10:49:55.6445392</Created><path><level id="1">Faculty of Science and Engineering</level><level id="2">School of Engineering and Applied Sciences - Uncategorised</level></path><authors><author><firstname>Gill</firstname><surname>Conway</surname><orcid>0000-0002-5991-0960</orcid><order>1</order></author><author><firstname>Shane</firstname><surname>Heffernan</surname><orcid>0000-0002-3297-9335</orcid><order>2</order></author><author><firstname>Katy</firstname><surname>Horner</surname><order>3</order></author><author><firstname>Giuseppe</firstname><surname>De Vito</surname><order>4</order></author><author><firstname>Gillian</firstname><surname>Conway</surname><order>5</order></author></authors><documents/><OutputDurs/></rfc1807>
spelling 2019-09-02T16:09:41.6393530 v2 51435 2019-08-16 The Role of Mineral and Trace Element Supplementation in Exercise and Athletic Performance: A Systematic Review e33e0ee5a076ad91fe6615117caa1800 0000-0002-5991-0960 Gill Conway Gill Conway true false 72c0b36891dfbec0378c0d0f7916e807 0000-0002-3297-9335 Shane Heffernan Shane Heffernan true false 2019-08-16 BMS Minerals and trace elements (MTEs) are micronutrients involved in hundreds of biological processes. Deficiency in MTEs can negatively affect athletic performance. Approximately 50% of athletes have reported consuming some form of micronutrient supplement; however, there is limited data confirming their efficacy for improving performance. The aim of this study was to systematically review the role of MTEs in exercise and athletic performance. Six electronic databases and grey literature sources (MEDLINE; EMBASE; CINAHL and SportDISCUS; Web of Science and clinicaltrials.gov) were searched, in accordance with PRISMA guidelines. Results: 17,433 articles were identified and 130 experiments from 128 studies were included. Retrieved articles included Iron (n = 29), Calcium (n = 11), Magnesium, (n = 22), Phosphate (n = 17), Zinc (n = 9), Sodium (n = 15), Boron (n = 4), Selenium (n = 5), Chromium (n = 12) and multi-mineral articles (n = 5). No relevant articles were identified for Copper, Manganese, Iodine, Nickel, Fluoride or Cobalt. Only Iron and Magnesium included articles of sufficient quality to be assigned as ‘strong’. Currently, there is little evidence to support the use of MTE supplementation to improve physiological markers of athletic performance, with the possible exception of Iron (in particular, biological situations) and Magnesium as these currently have the strongest quality evidence. Regardless, some MTEs may possess the potential to improve athletic performance, but more high quality research is required before support for these MTEs can be given. PROSPERO preregistered (CRD42018090502) Journal Article Nutrients 11 3 696 2072-6643 ergogenic aids; nutritional supplements; physical performance; exercise and sport nutrition; muscle function 31 12 2019 2019-12-31 10.3390/nu11030696 COLLEGE NANME Biomedical Sciences COLLEGE CODE BMS Swansea University 2019-09-02T16:09:41.6393530 2019-08-16T10:49:55.6445392 Faculty of Science and Engineering School of Engineering and Applied Sciences - Uncategorised Gill Conway 0000-0002-5991-0960 1 Shane Heffernan 0000-0002-3297-9335 2 Katy Horner 3 Giuseppe De Vito 4 Gillian Conway 5
title The Role of Mineral and Trace Element Supplementation in Exercise and Athletic Performance: A Systematic Review
spellingShingle The Role of Mineral and Trace Element Supplementation in Exercise and Athletic Performance: A Systematic Review
Gill Conway
Shane Heffernan
title_short The Role of Mineral and Trace Element Supplementation in Exercise and Athletic Performance: A Systematic Review
title_full The Role of Mineral and Trace Element Supplementation in Exercise and Athletic Performance: A Systematic Review
title_fullStr The Role of Mineral and Trace Element Supplementation in Exercise and Athletic Performance: A Systematic Review
title_full_unstemmed The Role of Mineral and Trace Element Supplementation in Exercise and Athletic Performance: A Systematic Review
title_sort The Role of Mineral and Trace Element Supplementation in Exercise and Athletic Performance: A Systematic Review
author_id_str_mv e33e0ee5a076ad91fe6615117caa1800
72c0b36891dfbec0378c0d0f7916e807
author_id_fullname_str_mv e33e0ee5a076ad91fe6615117caa1800_***_Gill Conway
72c0b36891dfbec0378c0d0f7916e807_***_Shane Heffernan
author Gill Conway
Shane Heffernan
author2 Gill Conway
Shane Heffernan
Katy Horner
Giuseppe De Vito
Gillian Conway
format Journal article
container_title Nutrients
container_volume 11
container_issue 3
container_start_page 696
publishDate 2019
institution Swansea University
issn 2072-6643
doi_str_mv 10.3390/nu11030696
college_str Faculty of Science and Engineering
hierarchytype
hierarchy_top_id facultyofscienceandengineering
hierarchy_top_title Faculty of Science and Engineering
hierarchy_parent_id facultyofscienceandengineering
hierarchy_parent_title Faculty of Science and Engineering
department_str School of Engineering and Applied Sciences - Uncategorised{{{_:::_}}}Faculty of Science and Engineering{{{_:::_}}}School of Engineering and Applied Sciences - Uncategorised
document_store_str 0
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description Minerals and trace elements (MTEs) are micronutrients involved in hundreds of biological processes. Deficiency in MTEs can negatively affect athletic performance. Approximately 50% of athletes have reported consuming some form of micronutrient supplement; however, there is limited data confirming their efficacy for improving performance. The aim of this study was to systematically review the role of MTEs in exercise and athletic performance. Six electronic databases and grey literature sources (MEDLINE; EMBASE; CINAHL and SportDISCUS; Web of Science and clinicaltrials.gov) were searched, in accordance with PRISMA guidelines. Results: 17,433 articles were identified and 130 experiments from 128 studies were included. Retrieved articles included Iron (n = 29), Calcium (n = 11), Magnesium, (n = 22), Phosphate (n = 17), Zinc (n = 9), Sodium (n = 15), Boron (n = 4), Selenium (n = 5), Chromium (n = 12) and multi-mineral articles (n = 5). No relevant articles were identified for Copper, Manganese, Iodine, Nickel, Fluoride or Cobalt. Only Iron and Magnesium included articles of sufficient quality to be assigned as ‘strong’. Currently, there is little evidence to support the use of MTE supplementation to improve physiological markers of athletic performance, with the possible exception of Iron (in particular, biological situations) and Magnesium as these currently have the strongest quality evidence. Regardless, some MTEs may possess the potential to improve athletic performance, but more high quality research is required before support for these MTEs can be given. PROSPERO preregistered (CRD42018090502)
published_date 2019-12-31T04:00:38Z
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