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The validity of a head-worn inertial sensor for measurements of swimming performance

James Butterfield, Jamie Tallent, Stephen David Patterson, Owen Jeffries, Louis Howe, Mark Waldron Orcid Logo

Movement & Sport Sciences - Science & Motricité

Swansea University Author: Mark Waldron Orcid Logo

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DOI (Published version): 10.1051/sm/2019027

Abstract

The validity of the TritonWear ® device to measure swimming performance Was Investigated, with a pre-determined analytical goal of 6%. Twenty youth swimmers completed a 100m swim in a 25m pool, swimming breaststroke freestyle gold wearing the TritonWear ® device, whilst being white filmed Above and...

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Published in: Movement & Sport Sciences - Science & Motricité
ISSN: 2118-5735 2118-5743
Published: 2019
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URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa51616
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first_indexed 2019-08-29T14:53:23Z
last_indexed 2019-10-15T14:30:17Z
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spelling 2019-10-15T11:32:37.8674771 v2 51616 2019-08-29 The validity of a head-worn inertial sensor for measurements of swimming performance 70db7c6c54d46f5e70b39e5ae0a056fa 0000-0002-2720-4615 Mark Waldron Mark Waldron true false 2019-08-29 STSC The validity of the TritonWear ® device to measure swimming performance Was Investigated, with a pre-determined analytical goal of 6%. Twenty youth swimmers completed a 100m swim in a 25m pool, swimming breaststroke freestyle gold wearing the TritonWear ® device, whilst being white filmed Above and below water with three cameras. 95% limits of agreement (95% LoA) and coefficient of variation (% CV) were used to calculate error. Systematic biases ( P <0.05) were found between the two systems only for distance per stroke during breaststroke. Freestyle metrics agreement ranked between 1.06% and 10.40% CV, except for distance per stroke (CV = 14.64%), and time underwater (CV = 18.15%). Breaststroke metrics ranked between 0.95% and 13.74% CV, except for time underwater (CV = 25.76%). The smallest errors were found for split-times, speed, stroke-count and stroke-rate, across both strokes (all <5% CV). The TritonWear ® can be used for basic metrics of performance, Such As split-time speed and aim the error of more complex measurements, Such As time underwater gold turn-times, render em Unable to Identify typical exchange performance. Journal Article Movement & Sport Sciences - Science & Motricité 2118-5735 2118-5743 31 12 2019 2019-12-31 10.1051/sm/2019027 COLLEGE NANME Sport and Exercise Sciences COLLEGE CODE STSC Swansea University 2019-10-15T11:32:37.8674771 2019-08-29T09:26:28.4211918 College of Engineering Engineering James Butterfield 1 Jamie Tallent 2 Stephen David Patterson 3 Owen Jeffries 4 Louis Howe 5 Mark Waldron 0000-0002-2720-4615 6 0051616-29082019093700.pdf butterfield2019.pdf 2019-08-29T09:37:00.1470000 Output 226330 application/pdf Accepted Manuscript true 2019-10-15T00:00:00.0000000 false eng
title The validity of a head-worn inertial sensor for measurements of swimming performance
spellingShingle The validity of a head-worn inertial sensor for measurements of swimming performance
Mark Waldron
title_short The validity of a head-worn inertial sensor for measurements of swimming performance
title_full The validity of a head-worn inertial sensor for measurements of swimming performance
title_fullStr The validity of a head-worn inertial sensor for measurements of swimming performance
title_full_unstemmed The validity of a head-worn inertial sensor for measurements of swimming performance
title_sort The validity of a head-worn inertial sensor for measurements of swimming performance
author_id_str_mv 70db7c6c54d46f5e70b39e5ae0a056fa
author_id_fullname_str_mv 70db7c6c54d46f5e70b39e5ae0a056fa_***_Mark Waldron
author Mark Waldron
author2 James Butterfield
Jamie Tallent
Stephen David Patterson
Owen Jeffries
Louis Howe
Mark Waldron
format Journal article
container_title Movement & Sport Sciences - Science & Motricité
publishDate 2019
institution Swansea University
issn 2118-5735
2118-5743
doi_str_mv 10.1051/sm/2019027
college_str College of Engineering
hierarchytype
hierarchy_top_id collegeofengineering
hierarchy_top_title College of Engineering
hierarchy_parent_id collegeofengineering
hierarchy_parent_title College of Engineering
department_str Engineering{{{_:::_}}}College of Engineering{{{_:::_}}}Engineering
document_store_str 1
active_str 0
description The validity of the TritonWear ® device to measure swimming performance Was Investigated, with a pre-determined analytical goal of 6%. Twenty youth swimmers completed a 100m swim in a 25m pool, swimming breaststroke freestyle gold wearing the TritonWear ® device, whilst being white filmed Above and below water with three cameras. 95% limits of agreement (95% LoA) and coefficient of variation (% CV) were used to calculate error. Systematic biases ( P <0.05) were found between the two systems only for distance per stroke during breaststroke. Freestyle metrics agreement ranked between 1.06% and 10.40% CV, except for distance per stroke (CV = 14.64%), and time underwater (CV = 18.15%). Breaststroke metrics ranked between 0.95% and 13.74% CV, except for time underwater (CV = 25.76%). The smallest errors were found for split-times, speed, stroke-count and stroke-rate, across both strokes (all <5% CV). The TritonWear ® can be used for basic metrics of performance, Such As split-time speed and aim the error of more complex measurements, Such As time underwater gold turn-times, render em Unable to Identify typical exchange performance.
published_date 2019-12-31T04:05:17Z
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score 10.878606