No Cover Image

Journal article 137 views 51 downloads

Flow rates in perfusion bioreactors to maximise mineralisation in bone tissue engineering in vitro

Feihu Zhao Orcid Logo, Bert van Rietbergen, Keita Ito, Sandra Hofmann

Journal of Biomechanics, Volume: 79, Pages: 232 - 237

Swansea University Author: Feihu Zhao Orcid Logo

  • JBiomech_Zhao.pdf

    PDF | Corrected Version of Record

    This article is released under Creative Commons License Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International (CC BY-NC-ND 4.0)

    Download (1.31MB)

Abstract

In bone tissue engineering experiments, fluid-induced shear stress can stimulate cells to produce mineralised extracellular matrix (ECM). The application of shear stress on seeded cells can for example be achieved through bioreactors that perfuse medium through porous scaffolds. The generated mechan...

Full description

Published in: Journal of Biomechanics
ISSN: 0021-9290
Published: 2018
Online Access: Check full text

URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa51681
Tags: Add Tag
No Tags, Be the first to tag this record!
Abstract: In bone tissue engineering experiments, fluid-induced shear stress can stimulate cells to produce mineralised extracellular matrix (ECM). The application of shear stress on seeded cells can for example be achieved through bioreactors that perfuse medium through porous scaffolds. The generated mechanical environment (i.e. wall shear stress: WSS) within the scaffolds is complex due to the complexity of scaffold geometry. This complexity has prevented setting an optimal loading (i.e. flow rate) of the bioreactor to achieve an optimal distribution of WSS for stimulating cells to produce mineralised ECM. In this study, a combination of computational fluid dynamics approach with mechano-regulation theory was employed to optimise the external flow rate for a perfusion bioreactor. Such flow rate would maximise the scaffold surface fraction, whose WSS was in the range required for mineralisation. As expected, the optimal flow rate was dependent on the scaffold geometry, in particular on the scaffold porosity. However, it was in a reasonable range of 0.5–5 mL/min (or in terms of fluid velocity: 0.166–1.66 mm/s) for the bioreactor used in our study. It is expected that this approach can lead to the reduction of pilot studies required to find optimal loading conditions as well as to a better insight into the parameters that determine the mineralisation within scaffolds.
Keywords: Computational fluid dynamics, wall shear stress, mechanical stimulation, bone tissue mineralisation
Start Page: 232
End Page: 237