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Crowdsourcing and Scholarly Culture: Understanding Expertise in an Age of Popularism

Alan Dix Orcid Logo, Rachel Cowgill, Christina Bashford, Simon McVeigh, Rupert Ridgewell

Macrotask Crowdsourcing, Pages: 189 - 214

Swansea University Author: Alan Dix Orcid Logo

Abstract

The increasing volume of digital material available to the humanities creates clear potential for crowdsourcing. However, tasks in the digital humanities typically do not satisfy the standard requirement for decomposition into microtasks each of which must require little expertise on behalf of the w...

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Published in: Macrotask Crowdsourcing
ISBN: 978-3-030-12333-8 978-3-030-12334-5
ISSN: 1571-5035 2524-4477
Published: Springer 2019
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URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa51937
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first_indexed 2019-09-18T14:19:04Z
last_indexed 2019-10-11T20:22:07Z
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spelling 2019-10-11T15:49:24.3710495 v2 51937 2019-09-18 Crowdsourcing and Scholarly Culture: Understanding Expertise in an Age of Popularism e31e47c578b2a6a39949aa7f149f4cf9 0000-0002-5242-7693 Alan Dix Alan Dix true false 2019-09-18 SCS The increasing volume of digital material available to the humanities creates clear potential for crowdsourcing. However, tasks in the digital humanities typically do not satisfy the standard requirement for decomposition into microtasks each of which must require little expertise on behalf of the worker and little context of the broader task. Instead, humanities tasks require scholarly knowledge to perform and even where sub-tasks can be extracted, these often involve broader context of the document or corpus from which they are extracted. That is the tasks are macrotasks, resisting simple decomposition. Building on a case study from musicology, the In Concert project, we will explore both the barriers to crowdsourcing in the creation of digital corpora and also examples where elements of automatic processing or less-expert work are possible in a broader matrix that also includes expert microtasks and macrotasks. Crucially we will see that the macrotask–microtask distinction is nuanced: it is often possible to create a partial decomposition into less-expert microtasks with residual expert macrotasks, and crucially do this in ways that preserve scholarly values. Book chapter Macrotask Crowdsourcing 189 214 Springer 978-3-030-12333-8 978-3-030-12334-5 1571-5035 2524-4477 crowdsourcing, human-computer interaction, digital humanities, macro task, musicology, intelligent interfaces 7 8 2019 2019-08-07 10.1007/978-3-030-12334-5_7 COLLEGE NANME Computer Science COLLEGE CODE SCS Swansea University 2019-10-11T15:49:24.3710495 2019-09-18T10:47:22.3767296 College of Science Computer Science Alan Dix 0000-0002-5242-7693 1 Rachel Cowgill 2 Christina Bashford 3 Simon McVeigh 4 Rupert Ridgewell 5 0051937-18092019104823.pdf Crowdsourcing-and-Scholarly-Culture-authors-final-version.pdf 2019-09-18T10:48:23.4100000 Output 4783964 application/pdf Accepted Manuscript true 2021-08-07T00:00:00.0000000 true eng
title Crowdsourcing and Scholarly Culture: Understanding Expertise in an Age of Popularism
spellingShingle Crowdsourcing and Scholarly Culture: Understanding Expertise in an Age of Popularism
Alan Dix
title_short Crowdsourcing and Scholarly Culture: Understanding Expertise in an Age of Popularism
title_full Crowdsourcing and Scholarly Culture: Understanding Expertise in an Age of Popularism
title_fullStr Crowdsourcing and Scholarly Culture: Understanding Expertise in an Age of Popularism
title_full_unstemmed Crowdsourcing and Scholarly Culture: Understanding Expertise in an Age of Popularism
title_sort Crowdsourcing and Scholarly Culture: Understanding Expertise in an Age of Popularism
author_id_str_mv e31e47c578b2a6a39949aa7f149f4cf9
author_id_fullname_str_mv e31e47c578b2a6a39949aa7f149f4cf9_***_Alan Dix
author Alan Dix
author2 Alan Dix
Rachel Cowgill
Christina Bashford
Simon McVeigh
Rupert Ridgewell
format Book chapter
container_title Macrotask Crowdsourcing
container_start_page 189
publishDate 2019
institution Swansea University
isbn 978-3-030-12333-8
978-3-030-12334-5
issn 1571-5035
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doi_str_mv 10.1007/978-3-030-12334-5_7
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college_str College of Science
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hierarchy_top_title College of Science
hierarchy_parent_id collegeofscience
hierarchy_parent_title College of Science
department_str Computer Science{{{_:::_}}}College of Science{{{_:::_}}}Computer Science
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description The increasing volume of digital material available to the humanities creates clear potential for crowdsourcing. However, tasks in the digital humanities typically do not satisfy the standard requirement for decomposition into microtasks each of which must require little expertise on behalf of the worker and little context of the broader task. Instead, humanities tasks require scholarly knowledge to perform and even where sub-tasks can be extracted, these often involve broader context of the document or corpus from which they are extracted. That is the tasks are macrotasks, resisting simple decomposition. Building on a case study from musicology, the In Concert project, we will explore both the barriers to crowdsourcing in the creation of digital corpora and also examples where elements of automatic processing or less-expert work are possible in a broader matrix that also includes expert microtasks and macrotasks. Crucially we will see that the macrotask–microtask distinction is nuanced: it is often possible to create a partial decomposition into less-expert microtasks with residual expert macrotasks, and crucially do this in ways that preserve scholarly values.
published_date 2019-08-07T04:05:39Z
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