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Measurement of multivalued response curves of a strongly nonlinear system by exploiting exciter dynamics / Genbei Zhang; Chaoping Zang; Michael Friswell

Mechanical Systems and Signal Processing, Volume: 140, Start page: 106474

Swansea University Author: Michael, Friswell

Abstract

A strongly nonlinear system often has multiple solutions under harmonic excitation. However, measuring all of these multiple responses in structural dynamics is challenging because often one solution is unstable and difficult to obtain. The standard stepped sine approach is to fix the harmonic excit...

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Published in: Mechanical Systems and Signal Processing
ISSN: 0888-3270
Published: Elsevier BV 2020
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URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa52683
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spelling 2020-12-14T15:42:17.2122320 v2 52683 2019-11-08 Measurement of multivalued response curves of a strongly nonlinear system by exploiting exciter dynamics 5894777b8f9c6e64bde3568d68078d40 Michael Friswell Michael Friswell true false 2019-11-08 EEN A strongly nonlinear system often has multiple solutions under harmonic excitation. However, measuring all of these multiple responses in structural dynamics is challenging because often one solution is unstable and difficult to obtain. The standard stepped sine approach is to fix the harmonic excitation force amplitude, and step the excitation frequency up or down. This leads to the well-known jump phenomenon, and captures at most two stable solutions. Alternatively, the excitation frequency can be fixed and the amplitude swept up or down, although this also leads to jumps in the response. Recently, experimental continuation methods have successfully measured all solutions, including the unstable solutions, via active control. This paper takes a different approach and exploits the dynamics of the electromagnetic exciter to both stabilize the unstable solution, and also to track the solutions continuously, without any jumps. This is achieved by monotonically increasing or decreasing the voltage applied to the exciter at a fixed frequency, and using the force drop-out phenomenon through the resonance to control the force applied to the structure. In these tests, the input voltage then defines the continuation parameter, rather than force amplitude or frequency in the standard tests. The obvious advantage of this method is that there is no feedback control of the excitation and it is easy to implement. A strongly nonlinear single degree of freedom system is used to demonstrate this method. Journal Article Mechanical Systems and Signal Processing 140 106474 Elsevier BV 0888-3270 Force drop-out phenomena, Multivalued response curves, Continuation, Nonlinear system 1 6 2020 2020-06-01 10.1016/j.ymssp.2019.106474 COLLEGE NANME Engineering COLLEGE CODE EEN Swansea University 2020-12-14T15:42:17.2122320 2019-11-08T10:05:00.6406812 Genbei Zhang 1 Chaoping Zang 2 Michael Friswell 3 52683__15830__2a9f5d05da8b4f448b00349d8c28a2da.pdf zhang2019(8).pdf 2019-11-08T10:08:31.8282227 Output 1735207 application/pdf Accepted Manuscript true 2020-11-07T00:00:00.0000000 true eng
title Measurement of multivalued response curves of a strongly nonlinear system by exploiting exciter dynamics
spellingShingle Measurement of multivalued response curves of a strongly nonlinear system by exploiting exciter dynamics
Michael, Friswell
title_short Measurement of multivalued response curves of a strongly nonlinear system by exploiting exciter dynamics
title_full Measurement of multivalued response curves of a strongly nonlinear system by exploiting exciter dynamics
title_fullStr Measurement of multivalued response curves of a strongly nonlinear system by exploiting exciter dynamics
title_full_unstemmed Measurement of multivalued response curves of a strongly nonlinear system by exploiting exciter dynamics
title_sort Measurement of multivalued response curves of a strongly nonlinear system by exploiting exciter dynamics
author_id_str_mv 5894777b8f9c6e64bde3568d68078d40
author_id_fullname_str_mv 5894777b8f9c6e64bde3568d68078d40_***_Michael, Friswell
author Michael, Friswell
author2 Genbei Zhang
Chaoping Zang
Michael Friswell
format Journal article
container_title Mechanical Systems and Signal Processing
container_volume 140
container_start_page 106474
publishDate 2020
institution Swansea University
issn 0888-3270
doi_str_mv 10.1016/j.ymssp.2019.106474
publisher Elsevier BV
document_store_str 1
active_str 0
description A strongly nonlinear system often has multiple solutions under harmonic excitation. However, measuring all of these multiple responses in structural dynamics is challenging because often one solution is unstable and difficult to obtain. The standard stepped sine approach is to fix the harmonic excitation force amplitude, and step the excitation frequency up or down. This leads to the well-known jump phenomenon, and captures at most two stable solutions. Alternatively, the excitation frequency can be fixed and the amplitude swept up or down, although this also leads to jumps in the response. Recently, experimental continuation methods have successfully measured all solutions, including the unstable solutions, via active control. This paper takes a different approach and exploits the dynamics of the electromagnetic exciter to both stabilize the unstable solution, and also to track the solutions continuously, without any jumps. This is achieved by monotonically increasing or decreasing the voltage applied to the exciter at a fixed frequency, and using the force drop-out phenomenon through the resonance to control the force applied to the structure. In these tests, the input voltage then defines the continuation parameter, rather than force amplitude or frequency in the standard tests. The obvious advantage of this method is that there is no feedback control of the excitation and it is easy to implement. A strongly nonlinear single degree of freedom system is used to demonstrate this method.
published_date 2020-06-01T04:16:06Z
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score 10.79001