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High-speed imaging the effect of snap-off distance and squeegee speed on the ink transfer mechanism of screen-printed carbon pastes / Sarah-Jane Potts, Christopher Phillips, Eifion Jewell, Ben Clifford, Yin Cheung Lau, Tim Claypole

Journal of Coatings Technology and Research, Volume: 17, Issue: 2, Pages: 447 - 459

Swansea University Authors: Sarah-Jane Potts, Christopher Phillips, Eifion Jewell, Ben Clifford, Tim Claypole

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Abstract

Screen printing is the most widely used process in the production of printed electronics due to its ability to consistently transfer inks containing a wide range of functional materials onto a range of substrates. However, despite its extensive use, the mechanism by which the ink is transferred thro...

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Published in: Journal of Coatings Technology and Research
ISSN: 1547-0091 1935-3804
Published: Springer Science and Business Media LLC 2020
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URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa53125
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However, despite its extensive use, the mechanism by which the ink is transferred through the mesh and onto the substrate is not fully understood. Existing theories are contradictory and lack experimental validation. Therefore, high-speed imaging was used in combination with a screen-printing simulation rig that was designed to provide good optical access to study ink deposition during the screen-printing process. The variation in the four stages of ink flow through the screen, described in the theory by Messerschmitt, has been quantified with respect to changes in snap-off distance and squeegee speed. Analyses of the images were compared with measurements of the ink properties and corroborated with analyses of the prints. This has provided a better understanding of the mechanism by which the ink transfers from the mesh to the substrate and subsequently separates in screen printing. 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spelling 2020-05-18T17:42:59.1605167 v2 53125 2020-01-07 High-speed imaging the effect of snap-off distance and squeegee speed on the ink transfer mechanism of screen-printed carbon pastes 8c536622ba65fa1e04912d0e2ede88f7 0000-0003-0208-2364 Sarah-Jane Potts Sarah-Jane Potts true false cc734f776f10b3fb9b43816c9f617bb5 0000-0001-8011-710X Christopher Phillips Christopher Phillips true false 13dc152c178d51abfe0634445b0acf07 0000-0002-6894-2251 Eifion Jewell Eifion Jewell true false eaaa538f5503e162cf91e18e06d58843 0000-0002-5111-3799 Ben Clifford Ben Clifford true false 7735385522f1e68a8775b4f709e91d55 0000-0003-1393-9634 Tim Claypole Tim Claypole true false 2020-01-07 MECH Screen printing is the most widely used process in the production of printed electronics due to its ability to consistently transfer inks containing a wide range of functional materials onto a range of substrates. However, despite its extensive use, the mechanism by which the ink is transferred through the mesh and onto the substrate is not fully understood. Existing theories are contradictory and lack experimental validation. Therefore, high-speed imaging was used in combination with a screen-printing simulation rig that was designed to provide good optical access to study ink deposition during the screen-printing process. The variation in the four stages of ink flow through the screen, described in the theory by Messerschmitt, has been quantified with respect to changes in snap-off distance and squeegee speed. Analyses of the images were compared with measurements of the ink properties and corroborated with analyses of the prints. This has provided a better understanding of the mechanism by which the ink transfers from the mesh to the substrate and subsequently separates in screen printing. This could be used as the basis for the development of predictive algorithms, as well as to improve the understanding of how to optimize print quality and performance. Journal Article Journal of Coatings Technology and Research 17 2 447 459 Springer Science and Business Media LLC 1547-0091 1935-3804 Ink transfer, Rheology, Printed electronics, Carbon inks, High-speed imaging 1 3 2020 2020-03-01 10.1007/s11998-019-00291-6 COLLEGE NANME Mechanical Engineering COLLEGE CODE MECH Swansea University 2020-05-18T17:42:59.1605167 2020-01-07T09:58:08.7408303 Sarah-Jane Potts 0000-0003-0208-2364 1 Christopher Phillips 0000-0001-8011-710X 2 Eifion Jewell 0000-0002-6894-2251 3 Ben Clifford 0000-0002-5111-3799 4 Yin Cheung Lau 5 Tim Claypole 0000-0003-1393-9634 6 53125__16212__208e35f0d758446a8c5cbb9410a17cf4.pdf potts2019.pdf 2020-01-07T10:01:43.4524723 Output 4505209 application/pdf Version of Record true 2020-01-07T00:00:00.0000000 Released under the terms of a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (CC-BY). true eng
title High-speed imaging the effect of snap-off distance and squeegee speed on the ink transfer mechanism of screen-printed carbon pastes
spellingShingle High-speed imaging the effect of snap-off distance and squeegee speed on the ink transfer mechanism of screen-printed carbon pastes
Sarah-Jane, Potts
Christopher, Phillips
Eifion, Jewell
Ben, Clifford
Tim, Claypole
title_short High-speed imaging the effect of snap-off distance and squeegee speed on the ink transfer mechanism of screen-printed carbon pastes
title_full High-speed imaging the effect of snap-off distance and squeegee speed on the ink transfer mechanism of screen-printed carbon pastes
title_fullStr High-speed imaging the effect of snap-off distance and squeegee speed on the ink transfer mechanism of screen-printed carbon pastes
title_full_unstemmed High-speed imaging the effect of snap-off distance and squeegee speed on the ink transfer mechanism of screen-printed carbon pastes
title_sort High-speed imaging the effect of snap-off distance and squeegee speed on the ink transfer mechanism of screen-printed carbon pastes
author_id_str_mv 8c536622ba65fa1e04912d0e2ede88f7
cc734f776f10b3fb9b43816c9f617bb5
13dc152c178d51abfe0634445b0acf07
eaaa538f5503e162cf91e18e06d58843
7735385522f1e68a8775b4f709e91d55
author_id_fullname_str_mv 8c536622ba65fa1e04912d0e2ede88f7_***_Sarah-Jane, Potts
cc734f776f10b3fb9b43816c9f617bb5_***_Christopher, Phillips
13dc152c178d51abfe0634445b0acf07_***_Eifion, Jewell
eaaa538f5503e162cf91e18e06d58843_***_Ben, Clifford
7735385522f1e68a8775b4f709e91d55_***_Tim, Claypole
author Sarah-Jane, Potts
Christopher, Phillips
Eifion, Jewell
Ben, Clifford
Tim, Claypole
author2 Sarah-Jane Potts
Christopher Phillips
Eifion Jewell
Ben Clifford
Yin Cheung Lau
Tim Claypole
format Journal article
container_title Journal of Coatings Technology and Research
container_volume 17
container_issue 2
container_start_page 447
publishDate 2020
institution Swansea University
issn 1547-0091
1935-3804
doi_str_mv 10.1007/s11998-019-00291-6
publisher Springer Science and Business Media LLC
document_store_str 1
active_str 0
description Screen printing is the most widely used process in the production of printed electronics due to its ability to consistently transfer inks containing a wide range of functional materials onto a range of substrates. However, despite its extensive use, the mechanism by which the ink is transferred through the mesh and onto the substrate is not fully understood. Existing theories are contradictory and lack experimental validation. Therefore, high-speed imaging was used in combination with a screen-printing simulation rig that was designed to provide good optical access to study ink deposition during the screen-printing process. The variation in the four stages of ink flow through the screen, described in the theory by Messerschmitt, has been quantified with respect to changes in snap-off distance and squeegee speed. Analyses of the images were compared with measurements of the ink properties and corroborated with analyses of the prints. This has provided a better understanding of the mechanism by which the ink transfers from the mesh to the substrate and subsequently separates in screen printing. This could be used as the basis for the development of predictive algorithms, as well as to improve the understanding of how to optimize print quality and performance.
published_date 2020-03-01T04:15:11Z
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