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High speed imaging of ink separation in screen-printing

Sarah-Jane Potts Orcid Logo, Christopher Phillips Orcid Logo, Tim Claypole Orcid Logo

Advances in Printing and Media Technology - Proceedings of the 46th International Research Conference of iarigai, Volume: XLVI(VI), Pages: 8 - 15

Swansea University Authors: Sarah-Jane Potts Orcid Logo, Christopher Phillips Orcid Logo, Tim Claypole Orcid Logo

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Abstract

Screen-printing is a versatile process used to print a wide range of printed electronics. However, there is a limited understanding of how the ink is deposited from the mesh to the substrate. Mathematical models have been suggested in the past, but there is not sufficient experimental evidence to va...

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Published in: Advances in Printing and Media Technology - Proceedings of the 46th International Research Conference of iarigai
ISBN: 978-3-948039-01-1
ISSN: 2409-4021
Published: Stuttgart, Germany
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URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa53316
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first_indexed 2020-01-20T19:29:44Z
last_indexed 2020-11-07T04:11:08Z
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spelling 2020-11-06T14:40:45.7012058 v2 53316 2020-01-20 High speed imaging of ink separation in screen-printing 8c536622ba65fa1e04912d0e2ede88f7 0000-0003-0208-2364 Sarah-Jane Potts Sarah-Jane Potts true false cc734f776f10b3fb9b43816c9f617bb5 0000-0001-8011-710X Christopher Phillips Christopher Phillips true false 7735385522f1e68a8775b4f709e91d55 0000-0003-1393-9634 Tim Claypole Tim Claypole true false 2020-01-20 MTLS Screen-printing is a versatile process used to print a wide range of printed electronics. However, there is a limited understanding of how the ink is deposited from the mesh to the substrate. Mathematical models have been suggested in the past, but there is not sufficient experimental evidence to validate them. In order to identify key transfer mechanisms and their impact on the process, an investigation was instigated which focussed on the separation mechanism occurring when the mesh is contacted and released from the substrate. high-speed video imaging was used to assess the deposition and separation of a commercial carbon ink when printed at a range of line widths from 50µm to 400 µm as an essential step in the development and validation of predictive models. The length of ink bridging the mesh and substrate increased with line width. The ink separation process could be split up into separate stages of adhesion, extension, flow and separation suggested in the theory by Messerschmitt. The adhesion and extension stages were longer than the flow and separation stages for all line widths assessed Conference Paper/Proceeding/Abstract Advances in Printing and Media Technology - Proceedings of the 46th International Research Conference of iarigai XLVI(VI) 8 15 Stuttgart, Germany 978-3-948039-01-1 2409-4021 carbon, inks, printed electronics 0 0 0 0001-01-01 10.14622/Advances_46_2019 COLLEGE NANME Materials Science and Engineering COLLEGE CODE MTLS Swansea University 2020-11-06T14:40:45.7012058 2020-01-20T16:15:16.9409460 Professional Services ISS - Uncategorised Sarah-Jane Potts 0000-0003-0208-2364 1 Christopher Phillips 0000-0001-8011-710X 2 Tim Claypole 0000-0003-1393-9634 3
title High speed imaging of ink separation in screen-printing
spellingShingle High speed imaging of ink separation in screen-printing
Sarah-Jane Potts
Christopher Phillips
Tim Claypole
title_short High speed imaging of ink separation in screen-printing
title_full High speed imaging of ink separation in screen-printing
title_fullStr High speed imaging of ink separation in screen-printing
title_full_unstemmed High speed imaging of ink separation in screen-printing
title_sort High speed imaging of ink separation in screen-printing
author_id_str_mv 8c536622ba65fa1e04912d0e2ede88f7
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author_id_fullname_str_mv 8c536622ba65fa1e04912d0e2ede88f7_***_Sarah-Jane Potts
cc734f776f10b3fb9b43816c9f617bb5_***_Christopher Phillips
7735385522f1e68a8775b4f709e91d55_***_Tim Claypole
author Sarah-Jane Potts
Christopher Phillips
Tim Claypole
author2 Sarah-Jane Potts
Christopher Phillips
Tim Claypole
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description Screen-printing is a versatile process used to print a wide range of printed electronics. However, there is a limited understanding of how the ink is deposited from the mesh to the substrate. Mathematical models have been suggested in the past, but there is not sufficient experimental evidence to validate them. In order to identify key transfer mechanisms and their impact on the process, an investigation was instigated which focussed on the separation mechanism occurring when the mesh is contacted and released from the substrate. high-speed video imaging was used to assess the deposition and separation of a commercial carbon ink when printed at a range of line widths from 50µm to 400 µm as an essential step in the development and validation of predictive models. The length of ink bridging the mesh and substrate increased with line width. The ink separation process could be split up into separate stages of adhesion, extension, flow and separation suggested in the theory by Messerschmitt. The adhesion and extension stages were longer than the flow and separation stages for all line widths assessed
published_date 0001-01-01T04:03:13Z
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