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Changes in scaffold porosity during bone tissue engineering in perfusion bioreactors considerably affect cellular mechanical stimulation for mineralization / Feihu Zhao, Damien Lacroix, Keita Ito, Bert van Rietbergen, Sandra Hofmann

Bone Reports, Volume: 12, Start page: 100265

Swansea University Author: Feihu Zhao

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Abstract

Bone tissue engineering (BTE) experiments in vitro have shown that fluid-induced wall shear stress (WSS) can stimulate cells to produce mineralized extracellular matrix (ECM). The application of WSS on seeded cells can be achieved through bioreactors that perfuse medium through porous scaffolds. In...

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Published in: Bone Reports
ISSN: 2352-1872
Published: Elsevier BV 2020
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URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa53924
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spelling 2020-10-20T12:31:40.8068771 v2 53924 2020-04-09 Changes in scaffold porosity during bone tissue engineering in perfusion bioreactors considerably affect cellular mechanical stimulation for mineralization 1c6e79b6edd08c88a8d17a241cd78630 0000-0003-0515-6808 Feihu Zhao Feihu Zhao true false 2020-04-09 MEDE Bone tissue engineering (BTE) experiments in vitro have shown that fluid-induced wall shear stress (WSS) can stimulate cells to produce mineralized extracellular matrix (ECM). The application of WSS on seeded cells can be achieved through bioreactors that perfuse medium through porous scaffolds. In BTE experiments in vitro, commonly a constant flow rate is used. Previous studies have found that tissue growth within the scaffold will result in an increase of the WSS over time. To keep the WSS in a reported optimal range of 10–30 mPa, the applied external flow rate can be decreased over time. To investigate what reduction of the external flow rate during culturing is needed to keep the WSS in the optimal range, we here conducted a computational study, which simulated the formation of ECM, and in which we investigated the effect of constant fluid flow and different fluid flow reduction scenarios on the WSS. It was found that for both constant and reduced fluid flow scenarios, the WSS did not exceed a critical value, which was set to 60 mPa. However, the constant flow velocity resulted in a reduction of the cell/ECM surface being exposed to a WSS in the optimal range from 50% at the start of culture to 18.6% at day 21. Reducing the fluid flow over time could avoid much of this effect, leaving the WSS in the optimal range for 40.9% of the surface at 21 days. Therefore, for achieving more mineralized tissue, the conventional manner of loading the perfusion bioreactors (i.e. constant flow rate/velocity) should be changed to a decreasing flow over time in BTE experiments. This study provides an in silico tool for finding the best fluid flow reduction strategy. Journal Article Bone Reports 12 100265 Elsevier BV 2352-1872 In silico bone tissue engineering, Extracellular matrix mineralization, Wall shear stress, Perfusion bioreactor 1 6 2020 2020-06-01 10.1016/j.bonr.2020.100265 COLLEGE NANME Biomedical Engineering COLLEGE CODE MEDE Swansea University 2020-10-20T12:31:40.8068771 2020-04-09T09:00:02.2548387 College of Engineering Engineering Feihu Zhao 0000-0003-0515-6808 1 Damien Lacroix 2 Keita Ito 3 Bert van Rietbergen 4 Sandra Hofmann 5 53924__17090__4c222f8b63cb42c9b7ed210b8bb87b88.pdf 53924VOR.pdf 2020-04-17T17:25:58.0717515 Output 1854485 application/pdf Version of Record true This is an open access article under the CC-BY-NC-ND license . true eng http://creativecommons.org/licenses/BY-NC-ND/4.0/
title Changes in scaffold porosity during bone tissue engineering in perfusion bioreactors considerably affect cellular mechanical stimulation for mineralization
spellingShingle Changes in scaffold porosity during bone tissue engineering in perfusion bioreactors considerably affect cellular mechanical stimulation for mineralization
Feihu, Zhao
title_short Changes in scaffold porosity during bone tissue engineering in perfusion bioreactors considerably affect cellular mechanical stimulation for mineralization
title_full Changes in scaffold porosity during bone tissue engineering in perfusion bioreactors considerably affect cellular mechanical stimulation for mineralization
title_fullStr Changes in scaffold porosity during bone tissue engineering in perfusion bioreactors considerably affect cellular mechanical stimulation for mineralization
title_full_unstemmed Changes in scaffold porosity during bone tissue engineering in perfusion bioreactors considerably affect cellular mechanical stimulation for mineralization
title_sort Changes in scaffold porosity during bone tissue engineering in perfusion bioreactors considerably affect cellular mechanical stimulation for mineralization
author_id_str_mv 1c6e79b6edd08c88a8d17a241cd78630
author_id_fullname_str_mv 1c6e79b6edd08c88a8d17a241cd78630_***_Feihu, Zhao
author Feihu, Zhao
author2 Feihu Zhao
Damien Lacroix
Keita Ito
Bert van Rietbergen
Sandra Hofmann
format Journal article
container_title Bone Reports
container_volume 12
container_start_page 100265
publishDate 2020
institution Swansea University
issn 2352-1872
doi_str_mv 10.1016/j.bonr.2020.100265
publisher Elsevier BV
college_str College of Engineering
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hierarchy_top_id collegeofengineering
hierarchy_top_title College of Engineering
hierarchy_parent_id collegeofengineering
hierarchy_parent_title College of Engineering
department_str Engineering{{{_:::_}}}College of Engineering{{{_:::_}}}Engineering
document_store_str 1
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description Bone tissue engineering (BTE) experiments in vitro have shown that fluid-induced wall shear stress (WSS) can stimulate cells to produce mineralized extracellular matrix (ECM). The application of WSS on seeded cells can be achieved through bioreactors that perfuse medium through porous scaffolds. In BTE experiments in vitro, commonly a constant flow rate is used. Previous studies have found that tissue growth within the scaffold will result in an increase of the WSS over time. To keep the WSS in a reported optimal range of 10–30 mPa, the applied external flow rate can be decreased over time. To investigate what reduction of the external flow rate during culturing is needed to keep the WSS in the optimal range, we here conducted a computational study, which simulated the formation of ECM, and in which we investigated the effect of constant fluid flow and different fluid flow reduction scenarios on the WSS. It was found that for both constant and reduced fluid flow scenarios, the WSS did not exceed a critical value, which was set to 60 mPa. However, the constant flow velocity resulted in a reduction of the cell/ECM surface being exposed to a WSS in the optimal range from 50% at the start of culture to 18.6% at day 21. Reducing the fluid flow over time could avoid much of this effect, leaving the WSS in the optimal range for 40.9% of the surface at 21 days. Therefore, for achieving more mineralized tissue, the conventional manner of loading the perfusion bioreactors (i.e. constant flow rate/velocity) should be changed to a decreasing flow over time in BTE experiments. This study provides an in silico tool for finding the best fluid flow reduction strategy.
published_date 2020-06-01T04:19:47Z
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