No Cover Image

Journal article 455 views 77 downloads

COVID-19 and digital disruption in UK universities: afflictions and affordances of emergency online migration / Richard Watermeyer, Tom Crick, Cathryn Knight, Janet Goodall

Higher Education, Volume: 81, Pages: 623 - 641

Swansea University Authors: Tom Crick, Cathryn Knight, Janet Goodall

  • 54331VOR.pdf

    PDF | Version of Record

    Released under the terms of a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (CC-BY).

    Download (517.44KB)

Abstract

COVID-19 has caused the closure of university campuses around the world and migration of all learning, teaching and assessment into online domains. The impacts of this on the academic community as frontline providers of higher education are profound. In this article we report the findings from a sur...

Full description

Published in: Higher Education
ISSN: 0018-1560 1573-174X
Published: Springer Science and Business Media LLC 2021
Online Access: Check full text

URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa54331
Tags: Add Tag
No Tags, Be the first to tag this record!
first_indexed 2020-05-29T19:09:07Z
last_indexed 2021-02-18T04:17:39Z
id cronfa54331
recordtype SURis
fullrecord <?xml version="1.0"?><rfc1807><datestamp>2021-02-17T09:32:08.7487899</datestamp><bib-version>v2</bib-version><id>54331</id><entry>2020-05-29</entry><title>COVID-19 and digital disruption in UK universities: afflictions and affordances of emergency online migration</title><swanseaauthors><author><sid>200c66ef0fc55391f736f6e926fb4b99</sid><ORCID>0000-0001-5196-9389</ORCID><firstname>Tom</firstname><surname>Crick</surname><name>Tom Crick</name><active>true</active><ethesisStudent>false</ethesisStudent></author><author><sid>e43d033fc7f2ccc9317c49df10b9b7bb</sid><ORCID>0000-0002-7574-3090</ORCID><firstname>Cathryn</firstname><surname>Knight</surname><name>Cathryn Knight</name><active>true</active><ethesisStudent>false</ethesisStudent></author><author><sid>ff88a186bd447a1af286d2468fc61688</sid><ORCID>0000-0002-0172-2035</ORCID><firstname>Janet</firstname><surname>Goodall</surname><name>Janet Goodall</name><active>true</active><ethesisStudent>false</ethesisStudent></author></swanseaauthors><date>2020-05-29</date><deptcode>EDUC</deptcode><abstract>COVID-19 has caused the closure of university campuses around the world and migration of all learning, teaching and assessment into online domains. The impacts of this on the academic community as frontline providers of higher education are profound. In this article we report the findings from a survey of n=1,148 academics working in universities in the United Kingdom (UK) and representing all the major disciplines and career hierarchy. Respondents report an abundance of what we call 'afflictions' exacted upon their role as educators and in far fewer yet no less visible ways 'affordances' derived from their rapid transition to online provision and early 'entry-level' use of digital pedagogies. Overall, they suggest that online migration is engendering significant dysfunctionality and disturbance to their pedagogical roles and their personal lives. They also signpost online migration as a major challenge for student recruitment, market sustainability, an academic labour-market, and local economies.</abstract><type>Journal Article</type><journal>Higher Education</journal><volume>81</volume><journalNumber/><paginationStart>623</paginationStart><paginationEnd>641</paginationEnd><publisher>Springer Science and Business Media LLC</publisher><placeOfPublication/><isbnPrint/><isbnElectronic/><issnPrint>0018-1560</issnPrint><issnElectronic>1573-174X</issnElectronic><keywords>COVID-19; UK higher education; Online learning, teaching and assessment; Digitalisation of universities; Academic profession</keywords><publishedDay>1</publishedDay><publishedMonth>3</publishedMonth><publishedYear>2021</publishedYear><publishedDate>2021-03-01</publishedDate><doi>10.1007/s10734-020-00561-y</doi><url/><notes/><college>COLLEGE NANME</college><department>Education</department><CollegeCode>COLLEGE CODE</CollegeCode><DepartmentCode>EDUC</DepartmentCode><institution>Swansea University</institution><apcterm/><lastEdited>2021-02-17T09:32:08.7487899</lastEdited><Created>2020-05-29T13:24:45.7280529</Created><path><level id="1">College of Arts and Humanities</level><level id="2">School of Education</level></path><authors><author><firstname>Richard</firstname><surname>Watermeyer</surname><order>1</order></author><author><firstname>Tom</firstname><surname>Crick</surname><orcid>0000-0001-5196-9389</orcid><order>2</order></author><author><firstname>Cathryn</firstname><surname>Knight</surname><orcid>0000-0002-7574-3090</orcid><order>3</order></author><author><firstname>Janet</firstname><surname>Goodall</surname><orcid>0000-0002-0172-2035</orcid><order>4</order></author></authors><documents><document><filename>54331__17488__f3bb417b08c84a91bad4a4cfb96cd14d.pdf</filename><originalFilename>54331VOR.pdf</originalFilename><uploaded>2020-06-12T18:35:43.8895208</uploaded><type>Output</type><contentLength>529857</contentLength><contentType>application/pdf</contentType><version>Version of Record</version><cronfaStatus>true</cronfaStatus><documentNotes>Released under the terms of a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (CC-BY).</documentNotes><copyrightCorrect>true</copyrightCorrect><language>eng</language><licence>http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/</licence></document></documents><OutputDurs/></rfc1807>
spelling 2021-02-17T09:32:08.7487899 v2 54331 2020-05-29 COVID-19 and digital disruption in UK universities: afflictions and affordances of emergency online migration 200c66ef0fc55391f736f6e926fb4b99 0000-0001-5196-9389 Tom Crick Tom Crick true false e43d033fc7f2ccc9317c49df10b9b7bb 0000-0002-7574-3090 Cathryn Knight Cathryn Knight true false ff88a186bd447a1af286d2468fc61688 0000-0002-0172-2035 Janet Goodall Janet Goodall true false 2020-05-29 EDUC COVID-19 has caused the closure of university campuses around the world and migration of all learning, teaching and assessment into online domains. The impacts of this on the academic community as frontline providers of higher education are profound. In this article we report the findings from a survey of n=1,148 academics working in universities in the United Kingdom (UK) and representing all the major disciplines and career hierarchy. Respondents report an abundance of what we call 'afflictions' exacted upon their role as educators and in far fewer yet no less visible ways 'affordances' derived from their rapid transition to online provision and early 'entry-level' use of digital pedagogies. Overall, they suggest that online migration is engendering significant dysfunctionality and disturbance to their pedagogical roles and their personal lives. They also signpost online migration as a major challenge for student recruitment, market sustainability, an academic labour-market, and local economies. Journal Article Higher Education 81 623 641 Springer Science and Business Media LLC 0018-1560 1573-174X COVID-19; UK higher education; Online learning, teaching and assessment; Digitalisation of universities; Academic profession 1 3 2021 2021-03-01 10.1007/s10734-020-00561-y COLLEGE NANME Education COLLEGE CODE EDUC Swansea University 2021-02-17T09:32:08.7487899 2020-05-29T13:24:45.7280529 College of Arts and Humanities School of Education Richard Watermeyer 1 Tom Crick 0000-0001-5196-9389 2 Cathryn Knight 0000-0002-7574-3090 3 Janet Goodall 0000-0002-0172-2035 4 54331__17488__f3bb417b08c84a91bad4a4cfb96cd14d.pdf 54331VOR.pdf 2020-06-12T18:35:43.8895208 Output 529857 application/pdf Version of Record true Released under the terms of a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (CC-BY). true eng http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
title COVID-19 and digital disruption in UK universities: afflictions and affordances of emergency online migration
spellingShingle COVID-19 and digital disruption in UK universities: afflictions and affordances of emergency online migration
Tom, Crick
Cathryn, Knight
Janet, Goodall
title_short COVID-19 and digital disruption in UK universities: afflictions and affordances of emergency online migration
title_full COVID-19 and digital disruption in UK universities: afflictions and affordances of emergency online migration
title_fullStr COVID-19 and digital disruption in UK universities: afflictions and affordances of emergency online migration
title_full_unstemmed COVID-19 and digital disruption in UK universities: afflictions and affordances of emergency online migration
title_sort COVID-19 and digital disruption in UK universities: afflictions and affordances of emergency online migration
author_id_str_mv 200c66ef0fc55391f736f6e926fb4b99
e43d033fc7f2ccc9317c49df10b9b7bb
ff88a186bd447a1af286d2468fc61688
author_id_fullname_str_mv 200c66ef0fc55391f736f6e926fb4b99_***_Tom, Crick
e43d033fc7f2ccc9317c49df10b9b7bb_***_Cathryn, Knight
ff88a186bd447a1af286d2468fc61688_***_Janet, Goodall
author Tom, Crick
Cathryn, Knight
Janet, Goodall
author2 Richard Watermeyer
Tom Crick
Cathryn Knight
Janet Goodall
format Journal article
container_title Higher Education
container_volume 81
container_start_page 623
publishDate 2021
institution Swansea University
issn 0018-1560
1573-174X
doi_str_mv 10.1007/s10734-020-00561-y
publisher Springer Science and Business Media LLC
college_str College of Arts and Humanities
hierarchytype
hierarchy_top_id collegeofartsandhumanities
hierarchy_top_title College of Arts and Humanities
hierarchy_parent_id collegeofartsandhumanities
hierarchy_parent_title College of Arts and Humanities
department_str School of Education{{{_:::_}}}College of Arts and Humanities{{{_:::_}}}School of Education
document_store_str 1
active_str 0
description COVID-19 has caused the closure of university campuses around the world and migration of all learning, teaching and assessment into online domains. The impacts of this on the academic community as frontline providers of higher education are profound. In this article we report the findings from a survey of n=1,148 academics working in universities in the United Kingdom (UK) and representing all the major disciplines and career hierarchy. Respondents report an abundance of what we call 'afflictions' exacted upon their role as educators and in far fewer yet no less visible ways 'affordances' derived from their rapid transition to online provision and early 'entry-level' use of digital pedagogies. Overall, they suggest that online migration is engendering significant dysfunctionality and disturbance to their pedagogical roles and their personal lives. They also signpost online migration as a major challenge for student recruitment, market sustainability, an academic labour-market, and local economies.
published_date 2021-03-01T04:10:36Z
_version_ 1718277831885062144
score 10.8434725