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Comparison of head impact measurements via an instrumented mouthguard and an anthropometric testing device

Desney Greybe, Christopher M. Jones Orcid Logo, Rowan Brown Orcid Logo, Elisabeth Williams Orcid Logo

Sports Engineering, Volume: 23, Issue: 1

Swansea University Authors: Desney Greybe, Christopher M. Jones Orcid Logo, Rowan Brown Orcid Logo, Elisabeth Williams Orcid Logo

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Abstract

The purpose of this study was to determine and compare the efficacy of head impact measurements via an electronic sensor framework, embedded within a mouthguard, against an anthropometric testing device. Development of the former is in response to the growing issue of head impacts and concussion in...

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Published in: Sports Engineering
ISSN: 1369-7072 1460-2687
Published: Springer Science and Business Media LLC 2020
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URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa54405
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Testing was conducted in a vehicle safety laboratory using a standard impact protocol utilising the headforms of anthropometric testing devices. The headforms were subjected to controlled front and side impacts. For each impact, the linear acceleration and rotational velocity was measured over a 104-ms interval at a frequency of 1 kHz. The magnitude of peak linear acceleration and peak rotational velocity was determined from the measured time-series traces and statistically compared. The peak linear acceleration and rotational velocity had intraclass correlation coefficients of 0.95 and 0.99, respectively. The root-mean-square error between the measurement systems was 4.3 g with a standard deviation of 3.5 g for peak linear acceleration and 0.7 rad/s with a standard deviation of 0.4 rad/s for rotational velocity. 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The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article's Creative Commons licence, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article's Creative Commons licence and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this licence, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.</documentNotes><copyrightCorrect>true</copyrightCorrect></document></documents><OutputDurs/></rfc1807>
spelling 2020-07-23T10:31:53.9831350 v2 54405 2020-06-08 Comparison of head impact measurements via an instrumented mouthguard and an anthropometric testing device bd05f59773276ec086d23e454b603c45 Desney Greybe Desney Greybe true false 36ca169634bb26ee4b086a7ce03257aa NULL Christopher M. Jones Christopher M. Jones true true d7db8d42c476dfa69c15ce06d29bd863 0000-0003-3628-2524 Rowan Brown Rowan Brown true false 2c5b3af00392058866bfd4af84bef390 0000-0002-8422-5842 Elisabeth Williams Elisabeth Williams true false 2020-06-08 The purpose of this study was to determine and compare the efficacy of head impact measurements via an electronic sensor framework, embedded within a mouthguard, against an anthropometric testing device. Development of the former is in response to the growing issue of head impacts and concussion in rugby union. Testing was conducted in a vehicle safety laboratory using a standard impact protocol utilising the headforms of anthropometric testing devices. The headforms were subjected to controlled front and side impacts. For each impact, the linear acceleration and rotational velocity was measured over a 104-ms interval at a frequency of 1 kHz. The magnitude of peak linear acceleration and peak rotational velocity was determined from the measured time-series traces and statistically compared. The peak linear acceleration and rotational velocity had intraclass correlation coefficients of 0.95 and 0.99, respectively. The root-mean-square error between the measurement systems was 4.3 g with a standard deviation of 3.5 g for peak linear acceleration and 0.7 rad/s with a standard deviation of 0.4 rad/s for rotational velocity. Bland and Altman analysis indicated a systematic bias of 2.5 g and − 0.5 rad/s and limits of agreement (1.96 × standard deviation) of ± 13.1 g and ± 1.25 rad/s for the instrumented mouthguard. These results provide the basis on which the instrumented mouthguard can be further developed for deployment and application within professional rugby, with a view to accurately and reliably quantify head collision dynamics. Journal Article Sports Engineering 23 1 Springer Science and Business Media LLC 1369-7072 1460-2687 1 12 2020 2020-12-01 10.1007/s12283-020-00324-z http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12283-020-00324-z COLLEGE NANME COLLEGE CODE Swansea University 2020-07-23T10:31:53.9831350 2020-06-08T12:46:37.6853056 Desney Greybe 1 Christopher M. Jones NULL 2 Rowan Brown 0000-0003-3628-2524 3 Elisabeth Williams 0000-0002-8422-5842 4 54405__17444__28f1145df4df4442b1095334c6ec23dc.pdf 54405.pdf 2020-06-08T12:47:56.0537594 Output 1817066 application/pdf Version of Record true This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons licence, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article's Creative Commons licence, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article's Creative Commons licence and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this licence, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/. true
title Comparison of head impact measurements via an instrumented mouthguard and an anthropometric testing device
spellingShingle Comparison of head impact measurements via an instrumented mouthguard and an anthropometric testing device
Desney Greybe
Christopher M. Jones
Rowan Brown
Elisabeth Williams
title_short Comparison of head impact measurements via an instrumented mouthguard and an anthropometric testing device
title_full Comparison of head impact measurements via an instrumented mouthguard and an anthropometric testing device
title_fullStr Comparison of head impact measurements via an instrumented mouthguard and an anthropometric testing device
title_full_unstemmed Comparison of head impact measurements via an instrumented mouthguard and an anthropometric testing device
title_sort Comparison of head impact measurements via an instrumented mouthguard and an anthropometric testing device
author_id_str_mv bd05f59773276ec086d23e454b603c45
36ca169634bb26ee4b086a7ce03257aa
d7db8d42c476dfa69c15ce06d29bd863
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author_id_fullname_str_mv bd05f59773276ec086d23e454b603c45_***_Desney Greybe
36ca169634bb26ee4b086a7ce03257aa_***_Christopher M. Jones
d7db8d42c476dfa69c15ce06d29bd863_***_Rowan Brown
2c5b3af00392058866bfd4af84bef390_***_Elisabeth Williams
author Desney Greybe
Christopher M. Jones
Rowan Brown
Elisabeth Williams
author2 Desney Greybe
Christopher M. Jones
Rowan Brown
Elisabeth Williams
format Journal article
container_title Sports Engineering
container_volume 23
container_issue 1
publishDate 2020
institution Swansea University
issn 1369-7072
1460-2687
doi_str_mv 10.1007/s12283-020-00324-z
publisher Springer Science and Business Media LLC
url http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12283-020-00324-z
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description The purpose of this study was to determine and compare the efficacy of head impact measurements via an electronic sensor framework, embedded within a mouthguard, against an anthropometric testing device. Development of the former is in response to the growing issue of head impacts and concussion in rugby union. Testing was conducted in a vehicle safety laboratory using a standard impact protocol utilising the headforms of anthropometric testing devices. The headforms were subjected to controlled front and side impacts. For each impact, the linear acceleration and rotational velocity was measured over a 104-ms interval at a frequency of 1 kHz. The magnitude of peak linear acceleration and peak rotational velocity was determined from the measured time-series traces and statistically compared. The peak linear acceleration and rotational velocity had intraclass correlation coefficients of 0.95 and 0.99, respectively. The root-mean-square error between the measurement systems was 4.3 g with a standard deviation of 3.5 g for peak linear acceleration and 0.7 rad/s with a standard deviation of 0.4 rad/s for rotational velocity. Bland and Altman analysis indicated a systematic bias of 2.5 g and − 0.5 rad/s and limits of agreement (1.96 × standard deviation) of ± 13.1 g and ± 1.25 rad/s for the instrumented mouthguard. These results provide the basis on which the instrumented mouthguard can be further developed for deployment and application within professional rugby, with a view to accurately and reliably quantify head collision dynamics.
published_date 2020-12-01T04:25:57Z
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