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Quantifying the Peak Physical Match-Play Demands of Professional Soccer Substitutes Following Pitch-Entry: Assessing Contextual Influences

Samuel P. Hills, Stephen Barrett, Bradley Thoseby, Liam P. Kilduff, Martin J. Barwood, Jon N. Radcliffe, Carlton B. Cooke, Mark Russell, Liam Kilduff Orcid Logo

Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport, Pages: 1 - 12

Swansea University Author: Liam Kilduff Orcid Logo

Abstract

Purpose: To quantify the peak post-pitch-entry physical responses of soccer substitutes while assessing contextual influences. Peak responses may be important performance indicators for substitutes introduced to provide a physical impact. Method: Thirty-three professional substitutes wore Microelect...

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Published in: Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport
ISSN: 0270-1367 2168-3824
Published: Informa UK Limited
Online Access: Check full text

URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa55153
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Abstract: Purpose: To quantify the peak post-pitch-entry physical responses of soccer substitutes while assessing contextual influences. Peak responses may be important performance indicators for substitutes introduced to provide a physical impact. Method: Thirty-three professional substitutes wore Microelectromechanical Systems during 44 matches (4 ± 3 observations·player−1). Post-pitch-entry relative peak values for total and high-speed (> 5.5 m·s−1) distances, average acceleration, and PlayerLoad™ were calculated using rolling averages over 60-s to 600-s. Linear mixed models assessed contextual influences (position, substitution timing, scoreline, and location). Results: Substitutes introduced during the final ~15 min of match-play covered less high-speed distance than first-half substitutes (~2.8–3.1 m·min−1) over 480-s to 600-s epochs, and less than 60:00–74:59 min substitutes (~1.7–1.8 m·min−1) during 540-s and 600-s epochs. Average acceleration during all except 180-s epochs was lower for 75:00+ min substitutes compared with first-half replacements (~0.27–0.43 m·s−2), and lower than 60:00–74:59 min substitutes during 60-s (~0.13 m·s−2). Substitutes introduced when their team was winning recorded greater distances over 120-s to 600-s (~6.2–7.7 m·min−1), and higher PlayerLoad™ values during 120-s, 180-s, 300-s, and 480-s epochs (~2.7–3.6 arbitrary units·min−1), compared with when scores were level at pitch-entry. Irrespective of substitution timing, substitute midfielders exceeded the total distance of substitute attackers (~5.9–16.2 m·min−1) for all except 360-s and 600-s epochs, and defenders (~13.3–26.7 m·min−1) during epochs < 300-s. Conclusions: This study provides benchmark data for practitioners tailoring training and recovery protocols, particularly “top-up” conditioning, to the competitive demands of soccer substitutes. Knowing how contextual factors influence substitutes’ peak match-play responses may help managers/coaches assess the efficacy of substitution strategies.
Keywords: Fatigue; football; monitoring, substitution
College: College of Engineering
Start Page: 1
End Page: 12