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Body temperature and physical performance responses are not maintained at the time of pitch-entry when typical substitute-specific match-day practices are adopted before simulated soccer match-play / Samuel P. Hills, Hendrickus G.J. Aben, David P. Starr, Liam Kilduff, Shawn M. Arent, Martin J. Barwood, Jon N. Radcliffe, Carlton B. Cooke, Mark Russell

Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, Volume: 24, Issue: 5, Pages: 511 - 516

Swansea University Author: Liam Kilduff

  • Accepted Manuscript under embargo until: 30th November 2021

Abstract

ObjectivesTo profile performance and physiological responses to typical patterns of match-day activity for second-half soccer substitutes.DesignDescriptive.MethodsFollowing a warm-up, 13 male team sports players underwent ∼85 min of rest, punctuated with five min rewarm-ups at ∼25, ∼50, and ∼70 min,...

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Published in: Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport
ISSN: 1440-2440
Published: Elsevier BV 2021
Online Access: Check full text

URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa55721
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Abstract: ObjectivesTo profile performance and physiological responses to typical patterns of match-day activity for second-half soccer substitutes.DesignDescriptive.MethodsFollowing a warm-up, 13 male team sports players underwent ∼85 min of rest, punctuated with five min rewarm-ups at ∼25, ∼50, and ∼70 min, before ∼30 min of simulated soccer match-play. Countermovement jump performance (jump height, peak power output), alongside 15 m sprints, were assessed post-warm-up, and pre- and post-simulated match-play. Core temperature, heart rate, ratings of perceived exertion, and blood glucose and lactate concentrations were measured throughout.ResultsWarm-up-induced core temperature elevations (∼2.3%, +0.85 °C; p < 0.001) were maintained until after the first rewarm-up. Thereafter, core temperature was reduced from post-warm-up values until pre-simulated match-play (∼1.6%, -0.60 °C; p < 0.001), where values were similar to pre-warm-up (37.07 ± 0.24 °C, p = 0.981). Simulated match-play increased core temperature progressively (p ≤ 0.05) but values remained lower than post-warm-up (∼5 min; p = 0.002) until ∼10 min into exercise. From post-warm-up to pre-simulated match-play, sprint times (∼3.9%, +0.10 s, p = 0.003), jump height (∼9.4%, -3.1 cm; p = 0.017), and peak power output (∼7.2%, −296 W; p < 0.001) worsened. Despite increased ratings of perceived exertion and elevated blood lactate concentrations (p ≤ 0.05), sprint times were maintained throughout exercise, whereas peak power increased (∼7.8%, +294 W; p = 0.006) pre- to post-exercise.ConclusionsAt the point of simulated pitch-entry, body temperature and physical performance responses were not maintained from warm-up cessation despite typical substitute-specific match-day practices being employed in thermoneutral conditions. Evidence of performance-limiting fatigue was absent during ∼30 min of simulated match-play. These data question the efficacy of practices typically implemented by substitutes before pitch-entry.
Keywords: Sprint, jump, warm-up, intermittent, rewarm-up, football
College: College of Engineering
Issue: 5
Start Page: 511
End Page: 516