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How Institutions Matter in the Context of Business Exit: A Country Comparison Using GEM Data and fsQCA / Malcolm Beynon, Martina Battisti, Paul Jones, David Pickernell

British Journal of Management, Volume: 32, Issue: 3, Pages: 832 - 851

Swansea University Author: Paul Jones

  • Accepted Manuscript under embargo until: 4th November 2022

Abstract

Despite evidence of substantial differences in business exit rates across countries, understanding of the institutional conditions contributing to those differences is still incomplete. Methodological limitations have left considerable gaps in our understandingof business exit, due to the dominance...

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Published in: British Journal of Management
ISSN: 1045-3172 1467-8551
Published: UK Wiley 2021
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URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa55595
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first_indexed 2020-11-04T19:47:18Z
last_indexed 2021-07-13T03:21:26Z
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spelling 2021-07-12T15:51:31.5600503 v2 55595 2020-11-04 How Institutions Matter in the Context of Business Exit: A Country Comparison Using GEM Data and fsQCA 21e2660aaa102fe36fc981880dd9e082 0000-0003-0417-9143 Paul Jones Paul Jones true false 2020-11-04 BBU Despite evidence of substantial differences in business exit rates across countries, understanding of the institutional conditions contributing to those differences is still incomplete. Methodological limitations have left considerable gaps in our understandingof business exit, due to the dominance of regression models that capture institutionalconditions in isolation, but fall short of identifying complex combinations of conditions.Using Global Entrepreneurship Monitor (GEM) data and a fuzzy-set qualitative comparative analysis (fsQCA) of a sample of 54 case countries, we utilize a configurationalapproach to examine how different combinations of regulatory, normative and culturalcognitive institutional conditions lead to variations in business exit rates across countries at different stages of economic development. Further, we identify distinct recipes leading to business exit that are associated with the presence or absence of high business exit rates across countries. The study contributes to institutional theory as well as the business exitliterature not only by discussing which combinations of institutions determine when exit is beneficial and detrimental to the economy, but also which specific combinations apply across sets of countries. Journal Article British Journal of Management 32 3 832 851 Wiley UK 1045-3172 1467-8551 Exit; SME; fsQCA 4 7 2021 2021-07-04 10.1111/1467-8551.12438 COLLEGE NANME Business COLLEGE CODE BBU Swansea University 2021-07-12T15:51:31.5600503 2020-11-04T19:25:46.6402443 School of Management Business Malcolm Beynon 1 Martina Battisti 2 Paul Jones 0000-0003-0417-9143 3 David Pickernell 4 Under embargo Under embargo 2021-01-25T17:48:28.5503450 Output 1522210 application/pdf Accepted Manuscript true 2022-11-04T00:00:00.0000000 true eng
title How Institutions Matter in the Context of Business Exit: A Country Comparison Using GEM Data and fsQCA
spellingShingle How Institutions Matter in the Context of Business Exit: A Country Comparison Using GEM Data and fsQCA
Paul, Jones
title_short How Institutions Matter in the Context of Business Exit: A Country Comparison Using GEM Data and fsQCA
title_full How Institutions Matter in the Context of Business Exit: A Country Comparison Using GEM Data and fsQCA
title_fullStr How Institutions Matter in the Context of Business Exit: A Country Comparison Using GEM Data and fsQCA
title_full_unstemmed How Institutions Matter in the Context of Business Exit: A Country Comparison Using GEM Data and fsQCA
title_sort How Institutions Matter in the Context of Business Exit: A Country Comparison Using GEM Data and fsQCA
author_id_str_mv 21e2660aaa102fe36fc981880dd9e082
author_id_fullname_str_mv 21e2660aaa102fe36fc981880dd9e082_***_Paul, Jones
author Paul, Jones
author2 Malcolm Beynon
Martina Battisti
Paul Jones
David Pickernell
format Journal article
container_title British Journal of Management
container_volume 32
container_issue 3
container_start_page 832
publishDate 2021
institution Swansea University
issn 1045-3172
1467-8551
doi_str_mv 10.1111/1467-8551.12438
publisher Wiley
college_str School of Management
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hierarchy_parent_id schoolofmanagement
hierarchy_parent_title School of Management
department_str Business{{{_:::_}}}School of Management{{{_:::_}}}Business
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description Despite evidence of substantial differences in business exit rates across countries, understanding of the institutional conditions contributing to those differences is still incomplete. Methodological limitations have left considerable gaps in our understandingof business exit, due to the dominance of regression models that capture institutionalconditions in isolation, but fall short of identifying complex combinations of conditions.Using Global Entrepreneurship Monitor (GEM) data and a fuzzy-set qualitative comparative analysis (fsQCA) of a sample of 54 case countries, we utilize a configurationalapproach to examine how different combinations of regulatory, normative and culturalcognitive institutional conditions lead to variations in business exit rates across countries at different stages of economic development. Further, we identify distinct recipes leading to business exit that are associated with the presence or absence of high business exit rates across countries. The study contributes to institutional theory as well as the business exitliterature not only by discussing which combinations of institutions determine when exit is beneficial and detrimental to the economy, but also which specific combinations apply across sets of countries.
published_date 2021-07-04T04:19:14Z
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score 10.832179