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Rise and Recharge: Effects on Activity Outcomes of an e-Health Smartphone Intervention to Reduce Office Workers’ Sitting Time / Abby Morris, Kelly Mackintosh, David Dunstan, Neville Owen, Paddy Dempsey, Thomas Pennington, Melitta McNarry

International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, Volume: 17, Issue: 24, Start page: 9300

Swansea University Authors: Abby Morris, Kelly Mackintosh, Thomas Pennington, Melitta McNarry

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DOI (Published version): 10.3390/ijerph17249300

Abstract

This feasibility study evaluated the effects of an individual-level intervention to target office workers total and prolonged sedentary behaviour during working hours, using an e-health smartphone application. A three-arm (Prompt-30 or 60 min Intervention arm and a No-Prompt Comparison arm), quasi-r...

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Published in: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
ISSN: 1660-4601 1660-4601
Published: MDPI AG 2020
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URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa55867
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spelling 2021-08-30T15:27:27.2719584 v2 55867 2020-12-10 Rise and Recharge: Effects on Activity Outcomes of an e-Health Smartphone Intervention to Reduce Office Workers’ Sitting Time 58b5ae95d89504735ae4dd163369fea4 Abby Morris Abby Morris true false bdb20e3f31bcccf95c7bc116070c4214 0000-0003-0355-6357 Kelly Mackintosh Kelly Mackintosh true false a4315a91ad1aec1b125b7d2d494809dc Thomas Pennington Thomas Pennington true false 062f5697ff59f004bc8c713955988398 0000-0003-0813-7477 Melitta McNarry Melitta McNarry true false 2020-12-10 EEN This feasibility study evaluated the effects of an individual-level intervention to target office workers total and prolonged sedentary behaviour during working hours, using an e-health smartphone application. A three-arm (Prompt-30 or 60 min Intervention arm and a No-Prompt Comparison arm), quasi-randomised intervention was conducted over 12 weeks. Behavioural outcomes (worktime sitting, standing, stepping, prolonged sitting, and physical activity) were monitored using accelerometers and anthropometrics measured at baseline, 6 weeks and 12 weeks. Cardiometabolic measures were taken at baseline and 12 weeks. Fifty-six office workers (64% female) completed baseline assessments. The Prompt-60 arm was associated with a reduction in occupational sitting time at 6 (−46.8 min/8 h workday [95% confidence interval = −86.4, −6.6], p < 0.05) and 12 weeks (−69.6 min/8 h workday [−111.0, −28.2], p < 0.05) relative to the No-Prompt Comparison arm. Sitting was primarily replaced with standing in both arms (p > 0.05). Both Intervention arms reduced time in prolonged sitting bouts at 12 weeks (Prompt-30: −27.0 [−99.0, 45.0]; Prompt-60: −25.8 [−98.4, 47.4] min/8 h workday; both p > 0.05). There were no changes in steps or cardiometabolic risk. Findings highlight the potential of a smartphone e-health application, suggesting 60 min prompts may present an optimal frequency to reduce total occupational sedentary behaviour. Journal Article International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 17 24 9300 MDPI AG 1660-4601 1660-4601 feasibility; workplace; intervention; sedentary behaviour; physical activity; sitting; activity breaks 12 12 2020 2020-12-12 10.3390/ijerph17249300 COLLEGE NANME Engineering COLLEGE CODE EEN Swansea University 2021-08-30T15:27:27.2719584 2020-12-10T13:41:28.3324623 College of Engineering Sports Science Abby Morris 1 Kelly Mackintosh 0000-0003-0355-6357 2 David Dunstan 3 Neville Owen 4 Paddy Dempsey 5 Thomas Pennington 6 Melitta McNarry 0000-0003-0813-7477 7 55867__18965__e9e39b8c9ccb44aba3ddbfd6a8569eac.pdf 55867 (2).pdf 2021-01-05T11:19:49.1315782 Output 597144 application/pdf Version of Record true © 2020 by the authors. This article is an open access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license true eng
title Rise and Recharge: Effects on Activity Outcomes of an e-Health Smartphone Intervention to Reduce Office Workers’ Sitting Time
spellingShingle Rise and Recharge: Effects on Activity Outcomes of an e-Health Smartphone Intervention to Reduce Office Workers’ Sitting Time
Abby, Morris
Kelly, Mackintosh
Thomas, Pennington
Melitta, McNarry
title_short Rise and Recharge: Effects on Activity Outcomes of an e-Health Smartphone Intervention to Reduce Office Workers’ Sitting Time
title_full Rise and Recharge: Effects on Activity Outcomes of an e-Health Smartphone Intervention to Reduce Office Workers’ Sitting Time
title_fullStr Rise and Recharge: Effects on Activity Outcomes of an e-Health Smartphone Intervention to Reduce Office Workers’ Sitting Time
title_full_unstemmed Rise and Recharge: Effects on Activity Outcomes of an e-Health Smartphone Intervention to Reduce Office Workers’ Sitting Time
title_sort Rise and Recharge: Effects on Activity Outcomes of an e-Health Smartphone Intervention to Reduce Office Workers’ Sitting Time
author_id_str_mv 58b5ae95d89504735ae4dd163369fea4
bdb20e3f31bcccf95c7bc116070c4214
a4315a91ad1aec1b125b7d2d494809dc
062f5697ff59f004bc8c713955988398
author_id_fullname_str_mv 58b5ae95d89504735ae4dd163369fea4_***_Abby, Morris
bdb20e3f31bcccf95c7bc116070c4214_***_Kelly, Mackintosh
a4315a91ad1aec1b125b7d2d494809dc_***_Thomas, Pennington
062f5697ff59f004bc8c713955988398_***_Melitta, McNarry
author Abby, Morris
Kelly, Mackintosh
Thomas, Pennington
Melitta, McNarry
author2 Abby Morris
Kelly Mackintosh
David Dunstan
Neville Owen
Paddy Dempsey
Thomas Pennington
Melitta McNarry
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container_title International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
container_volume 17
container_issue 24
container_start_page 9300
publishDate 2020
institution Swansea University
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1660-4601
doi_str_mv 10.3390/ijerph17249300
publisher MDPI AG
college_str College of Engineering
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hierarchy_top_id collegeofengineering
hierarchy_top_title College of Engineering
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hierarchy_parent_title College of Engineering
department_str Sports Science{{{_:::_}}}College of Engineering{{{_:::_}}}Sports Science
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description This feasibility study evaluated the effects of an individual-level intervention to target office workers total and prolonged sedentary behaviour during working hours, using an e-health smartphone application. A three-arm (Prompt-30 or 60 min Intervention arm and a No-Prompt Comparison arm), quasi-randomised intervention was conducted over 12 weeks. Behavioural outcomes (worktime sitting, standing, stepping, prolonged sitting, and physical activity) were monitored using accelerometers and anthropometrics measured at baseline, 6 weeks and 12 weeks. Cardiometabolic measures were taken at baseline and 12 weeks. Fifty-six office workers (64% female) completed baseline assessments. The Prompt-60 arm was associated with a reduction in occupational sitting time at 6 (−46.8 min/8 h workday [95% confidence interval = −86.4, −6.6], p < 0.05) and 12 weeks (−69.6 min/8 h workday [−111.0, −28.2], p < 0.05) relative to the No-Prompt Comparison arm. Sitting was primarily replaced with standing in both arms (p > 0.05). Both Intervention arms reduced time in prolonged sitting bouts at 12 weeks (Prompt-30: −27.0 [−99.0, 45.0]; Prompt-60: −25.8 [−98.4, 47.4] min/8 h workday; both p > 0.05). There were no changes in steps or cardiometabolic risk. Findings highlight the potential of a smartphone e-health application, suggesting 60 min prompts may present an optimal frequency to reduce total occupational sedentary behaviour.
published_date 2020-12-12T04:19:08Z
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