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Cholesterol metabolism pathways – are the intermediates more important than the products? / Yuqin Wang, Eylan Yutuc, William Griffiths

The FEBS Journal, Volume: 288, Issue: 12, Pages: 3727 - 3745

Swansea University Authors: Yuqin Wang, Eylan Yutuc, William Griffiths

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DOI (Published version): 10.1111/febs.15727

Abstract

Every cell in vertebrates possesses the machinery to synthesise cholesterol and to metabolise it. The major route of cholesterol metabolism is conversion to bile acids. Bile acids themselves are interesting molecules being ligands to nuclear and G protein-coupled receptors, but perhaps the intermedi...

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Published in: The FEBS Journal
ISSN: 1742-464X 1742-4658
Published: Wiley 2021
Online Access: Check full text

URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa56158
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Abstract: Every cell in vertebrates possesses the machinery to synthesise cholesterol and to metabolise it. The major route of cholesterol metabolism is conversion to bile acids. Bile acids themselves are interesting molecules being ligands to nuclear and G protein-coupled receptors, but perhaps the intermediates in the bile acid biosynthesis pathways are even more interesting and equally important. Here we discuss the biological activity of the different intermediates generated in the various bile acid biosynthesis pathways. We put forward the hypothesis that the acidic pathway of bile acid biosynthesis has primary evolved to generate signalling molecules and its utilisation by hepatocytes provides an added bonus of producing bile acids to aid absorption of lipids in the intestine.
Keywords: cholestenoic acids; COVID-19; G protein-coupled receptors; glutamate receptors; inborn errors of metabolism; massspectrometry; nuclear receptors; oxysterols; sterols
College: Swansea University Medical School
Issue: 12
Start Page: 3727
End Page: 3745