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Fouling communities and non-native species within five ports along the Bristol Channel, South Wales, UK / Sam Holmes; Ruth Callaway

Estuarine, Coastal and Shelf Science, Volume: 252, Start page: 107295

Swansea University Authors: Sam, Holmes, Ruth, Callaway

  • Accepted Manuscript under embargo until: 24th February 2022

Abstract

Non-native species (NNS) are widely regarded to be one of the major threats to the loss of biodiversity worldwide.Maritime trade is the primary pathway for the transport and introduction of aquatic NNS around the world,and ports are central to this network. Our knowledge of port communities and the...

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Published in: Estuarine, Coastal and Shelf Science
ISSN: 0272-7714
Published: Elsevier BV 2021
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URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa56373
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first_indexed 2021-03-04T17:39:27Z
last_indexed 2021-03-24T04:22:03Z
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spelling 2021-03-23T10:06:48.8510198 v2 56373 2021-03-04 Fouling communities and non-native species within five ports along the Bristol Channel, South Wales, UK 262169213c90e889d4f8563357f36f63 Sam Holmes Sam Holmes true false 61d7fe28cbb286de1c9c43f45014c490 0000-0001-9710-2940 Ruth Callaway Ruth Callaway true false 2021-03-04 SBI Non-native species (NNS) are widely regarded to be one of the major threats to the loss of biodiversity worldwide.Maritime trade is the primary pathway for the transport and introduction of aquatic NNS around the world,and ports are central to this network. Our knowledge of port communities and the NNS they contain is limited,with ports often remaining unsurveyed for decades, which was the case within the studied region. Settlementplates were deployed for 10–11 months at five commercial ports along the Bristol Channel and Severn Estuary inSouth Wales, UK. We report unique communities in each of the ports with salinity being the main driver fordifferences among locations. Eleven NNS were identified across all ports with non-native to native speciesproportions ranging from 0.13 to 0.33 in each port. Most of these NNS are known to exist in the region and are‘established’ species within the UK. High variation in community structure and NNS composition among all portsindependent of geographic proximity highlights the importance of monitoring individual ports with a view toimplementing bespoke, effective NNS management strategies. Journal Article Estuarine, Coastal and Shelf Science 252 107295 Elsevier BV 0272-7714 Alien species, Artificial harbours, Maritime trade, Fouling organisms, Community composition, Biological surveys 5 5 2021 2021-05-05 10.1016/j.ecss.2021.107295 COLLEGE NANME Biosciences COLLEGE CODE SBI Swansea University Associated British Ports, Knowledge Economy Skills Scholarships (KESS 2), European Social Fund (ESF) via the Welsh Government 2021-03-23T10:06:48.8510198 2021-03-04T17:30:14.2017498 College of Science Biosciences Sam Holmes 1 Ruth Callaway 0000-0001-9710-2940 2 Under embargo Under embargo 2021-03-23T10:03:16.9652680 Output 801226 application/pdf Accepted Manuscript true 2022-02-24T00:00:00.0000000 ©2021 All rights reserved. All article content, except where otherwise noted, is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial No Derivatives License (CC-BY-NC-ND) true eng
title Fouling communities and non-native species within five ports along the Bristol Channel, South Wales, UK
spellingShingle Fouling communities and non-native species within five ports along the Bristol Channel, South Wales, UK
Sam, Holmes
Ruth, Callaway
title_short Fouling communities and non-native species within five ports along the Bristol Channel, South Wales, UK
title_full Fouling communities and non-native species within five ports along the Bristol Channel, South Wales, UK
title_fullStr Fouling communities and non-native species within five ports along the Bristol Channel, South Wales, UK
title_full_unstemmed Fouling communities and non-native species within five ports along the Bristol Channel, South Wales, UK
title_sort Fouling communities and non-native species within five ports along the Bristol Channel, South Wales, UK
author_id_str_mv 262169213c90e889d4f8563357f36f63
61d7fe28cbb286de1c9c43f45014c490
author_id_fullname_str_mv 262169213c90e889d4f8563357f36f63_***_Sam, Holmes
61d7fe28cbb286de1c9c43f45014c490_***_Ruth, Callaway
author Sam, Holmes
Ruth, Callaway
author2 Sam Holmes
Ruth Callaway
format Journal article
container_title Estuarine, Coastal and Shelf Science
container_volume 252
container_start_page 107295
publishDate 2021
institution Swansea University
issn 0272-7714
doi_str_mv 10.1016/j.ecss.2021.107295
publisher Elsevier BV
college_str College of Science
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hierarchy_top_id collegeofscience
hierarchy_top_title College of Science
hierarchy_parent_id collegeofscience
hierarchy_parent_title College of Science
department_str Biosciences{{{_:::_}}}College of Science{{{_:::_}}}Biosciences
document_store_str 0
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description Non-native species (NNS) are widely regarded to be one of the major threats to the loss of biodiversity worldwide.Maritime trade is the primary pathway for the transport and introduction of aquatic NNS around the world,and ports are central to this network. Our knowledge of port communities and the NNS they contain is limited,with ports often remaining unsurveyed for decades, which was the case within the studied region. Settlementplates were deployed for 10–11 months at five commercial ports along the Bristol Channel and Severn Estuary inSouth Wales, UK. We report unique communities in each of the ports with salinity being the main driver fordifferences among locations. Eleven NNS were identified across all ports with non-native to native speciesproportions ranging from 0.13 to 0.33 in each port. Most of these NNS are known to exist in the region and are‘established’ species within the UK. High variation in community structure and NNS composition among all portsindependent of geographic proximity highlights the importance of monitoring individual ports with a view toimplementing bespoke, effective NNS management strategies.
published_date 2021-05-05T04:25:55Z
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