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Lumbriculus variegatus: A novel organism for in vivo pharmacology education

Aidan Seeley Orcid Logo, Caitlin Bellamy, Nia Davies, Lisa Wallace Orcid Logo

Pharmacology Research & Perspectives, Volume: 9, Issue: 5

Swansea University Authors: Aidan Seeley Orcid Logo, Caitlin Bellamy , Nia Davies , Lisa Wallace Orcid Logo

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DOI (Published version): 10.1002/prp2.853

Abstract

Pharmacology graduates require an understanding of both in vitro and in vivo drug responses but there has been a decline in animal use in pharmacology education over the last 30 years. To address this, we present the novel invertebrate model, Lumbriculus variegatus, for in vivo testing of drugs in a...

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Published in: Pharmacology Research & Perspectives
ISSN: 2052-1707 2052-1707
Published: Wiley 2021
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URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa57739
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To address this, we present the novel invertebrate model, Lumbriculus variegatus, for in vivo testing of drugs in a teaching environment. We have developed two novel behavioral assays: the stereotypical movement assay, which measures the effect of drugs on the ability of L. variegatus to perform stereotypical movements following tactile stimulation, and the free locomotion assay, which measures drug effects on unstimulated movement. We report the effects of compounds with diverse pharmacodynamic properties on L. variegatus using these assays. The ryanodine receptor antagonist, dantrolene, altered the unstimulated movement of L. variegatus at 5 &#x3BC;M, whereas stimulated movement was inhibited at &#x2265;25 &#x3BC;M. Lidocaine, a voltage-gated sodium channel blocker, and quinine, a nonselective sodium and potassium channel blocker, reduced both stimulated and unstimulated L. variegatus movement at &#x2265;0.5 mM. Inhibitory effects of quinine persisted for up to 24 h after drug removal, whereas lidocaine effects were reduced 10 min after drug removal. 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spelling 2021-09-20T14:44:49.2555072 v2 57739 2021-08-31 Lumbriculus variegatus: A novel organism for in vivo pharmacology education c69dba86b3ccf9a140b67b7e97d68bba 0000-0001-7085-4296 Aidan Seeley Aidan Seeley true false 8650f5512bcfcaed6729c038a632e356 Caitlin Bellamy Caitlin Bellamy true false 977abe5c673627024e4913d034dcbc95 Nia Davies Nia Davies true false 5cebf16bdbc8022118a35da9d13f5087 0000-0001-7471-9833 Lisa Wallace Lisa Wallace true false 2021-08-31 BMS Pharmacology graduates require an understanding of both in vitro and in vivo drug responses but there has been a decline in animal use in pharmacology education over the last 30 years. To address this, we present the novel invertebrate model, Lumbriculus variegatus, for in vivo testing of drugs in a teaching environment. We have developed two novel behavioral assays: the stereotypical movement assay, which measures the effect of drugs on the ability of L. variegatus to perform stereotypical movements following tactile stimulation, and the free locomotion assay, which measures drug effects on unstimulated movement. We report the effects of compounds with diverse pharmacodynamic properties on L. variegatus using these assays. The ryanodine receptor antagonist, dantrolene, altered the unstimulated movement of L. variegatus at 5 μM, whereas stimulated movement was inhibited at ≥25 μM. Lidocaine, a voltage-gated sodium channel blocker, and quinine, a nonselective sodium and potassium channel blocker, reduced both stimulated and unstimulated L. variegatus movement at ≥0.5 mM. Inhibitory effects of quinine persisted for up to 24 h after drug removal, whereas lidocaine effects were reduced 10 min after drug removal. Herein, we provide proof-of-concept utilization of L. variegatus as an organism for use in in vivo pharmacology education but without regulatory constraints or the need for specialized equipment and training. Journal Article Pharmacology Research & Perspectives 9 5 Wiley 2052-1707 2052-1707 animals, laboratory, education, invertebrates, model, animal models, educational, oligochaeta, teaching 1 10 2021 2021-10-01 10.1002/prp2.853 COLLEGE NANME Biomedical Sciences COLLEGE CODE BMS Swansea University SU Library paid the OA fee (TA Institutional Deal) This work is supporting by an Education Grant from the British Pharmacological Society. British Pharmacological Society. Grant Numbers: Teaching Grant 2019, Teaching Grant 2020 2021-09-20T14:44:49.2555072 2021-08-31T18:55:28.0468113 Swansea University Medical School Swansea University Medical School Aidan Seeley 0000-0001-7085-4296 1 Caitlin Bellamy 2 Nia Davies 3 Lisa Wallace 0000-0001-7471-9833 4 57739__20739__28abbd2b3de14ce9ae5e66e0c26a8ea6.pdf 57739.VOR.pdf 2021-09-02T12:29:36.8609672 Output 1663369 application/pdf Version of Record true This is an open access article under the terms of the Creat ive Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. © 2021 The Authors. true eng http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
title Lumbriculus variegatus: A novel organism for in vivo pharmacology education
spellingShingle Lumbriculus variegatus: A novel organism for in vivo pharmacology education
Aidan, Seeley
Caitlin, Bellamy
Nia, Davies
Lisa, Wallace
title_short Lumbriculus variegatus: A novel organism for in vivo pharmacology education
title_full Lumbriculus variegatus: A novel organism for in vivo pharmacology education
title_fullStr Lumbriculus variegatus: A novel organism for in vivo pharmacology education
title_full_unstemmed Lumbriculus variegatus: A novel organism for in vivo pharmacology education
title_sort Lumbriculus variegatus: A novel organism for in vivo pharmacology education
author_id_str_mv c69dba86b3ccf9a140b67b7e97d68bba
8650f5512bcfcaed6729c038a632e356
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5cebf16bdbc8022118a35da9d13f5087
author_id_fullname_str_mv c69dba86b3ccf9a140b67b7e97d68bba_***_Aidan, Seeley_***_0000-0001-7085-4296
8650f5512bcfcaed6729c038a632e356_***_Caitlin, Bellamy_***_
977abe5c673627024e4913d034dcbc95_***_Nia, Davies_***_
5cebf16bdbc8022118a35da9d13f5087_***_Lisa, Wallace_***_0000-0001-7471-9833
author Aidan, Seeley
Caitlin, Bellamy
Nia, Davies
Lisa, Wallace
author2 Aidan Seeley
Caitlin Bellamy
Nia Davies
Lisa Wallace
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description Pharmacology graduates require an understanding of both in vitro and in vivo drug responses but there has been a decline in animal use in pharmacology education over the last 30 years. To address this, we present the novel invertebrate model, Lumbriculus variegatus, for in vivo testing of drugs in a teaching environment. We have developed two novel behavioral assays: the stereotypical movement assay, which measures the effect of drugs on the ability of L. variegatus to perform stereotypical movements following tactile stimulation, and the free locomotion assay, which measures drug effects on unstimulated movement. We report the effects of compounds with diverse pharmacodynamic properties on L. variegatus using these assays. The ryanodine receptor antagonist, dantrolene, altered the unstimulated movement of L. variegatus at 5 μM, whereas stimulated movement was inhibited at ≥25 μM. Lidocaine, a voltage-gated sodium channel blocker, and quinine, a nonselective sodium and potassium channel blocker, reduced both stimulated and unstimulated L. variegatus movement at ≥0.5 mM. Inhibitory effects of quinine persisted for up to 24 h after drug removal, whereas lidocaine effects were reduced 10 min after drug removal. Herein, we provide proof-of-concept utilization of L. variegatus as an organism for use in in vivo pharmacology education but without regulatory constraints or the need for specialized equipment and training.
published_date 2021-10-01T04:25:41Z
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