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Cryptosporidium

Rachel Chalmers, Angharad Davies Orcid Logo, Kevin Tyler

Microbiology, Volume: 165, Issue: 5, Pages: 500 - 502

Swansea University Authors: Rachel Chalmers, Angharad Davies Orcid Logo

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DOI (Published version): 10.1099/mic.0.000764

Abstract

The protozoan Cryptosporidium is notorious for its resistance to chlorine disinfection, a mainstay of water treatment. Human infections, mainly of the small intestine, arise from consumption of faecally contaminated food or water, environmental exposure, and person-to-person or animal-to-person spre...

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Published in: Microbiology
ISSN: 1350-0872 1465-2080
Published: Microbiology Society 2019
Online Access: Check full text

URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa57851
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Abstract: The protozoan Cryptosporidium is notorious for its resistance to chlorine disinfection, a mainstay of water treatment. Human infections, mainly of the small intestine, arise from consumption of faecally contaminated food or water, environmental exposure, and person-to-person or animal-to-person spread. Acute gastrointestinal symptoms can be prolonged but are usually self-limiting. Problems arise with immune-deficient, including malnourished, people including chronic diarrhoea, hepato-biliary tree and extra-gastrointestinal site infection, and few options for treatment or prevention exist. Although genomics has enabled refined classification, identification of chemotherapeutic targets and vaccine candidates, and putative factors for host adaption and pathogenesis, their confirmation has been hampered by a lack of biological tools.
Keywords: Cryptosporidium; infection; sequelae
College: Swansea University Medical School
Issue: 5
Start Page: 500
End Page: 502