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Cryptosporidium

Rachel Chalmers, Angharad Davies Orcid Logo, Kevin Tyler

Microbiology, Volume: 165, Issue: 5, Pages: 500 - 502

Swansea University Authors: Rachel Chalmers, Angharad Davies Orcid Logo

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DOI (Published version): 10.1099/mic.0.000764

Abstract

The protozoan Cryptosporidium is notorious for its resistance to chlorine disinfection, a mainstay of water treatment. Human infections, mainly of the small intestine, arise from consumption of faecally contaminated food or water, environmental exposure, and person-to-person or animal-to-person spre...

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Published in: Microbiology
ISSN: 1350-0872 1465-2080
Published: Microbiology Society 2019
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URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa57851
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title Cryptosporidium
spellingShingle Cryptosporidium
Rachel Chalmers
Angharad Davies
title_short Cryptosporidium
title_full Cryptosporidium
title_fullStr Cryptosporidium
title_full_unstemmed Cryptosporidium
title_sort Cryptosporidium
author_id_str_mv 900a2910defaf8b5487da2d098b417e6
62586459693e05b2e1063967e76883f1
author_id_fullname_str_mv 900a2910defaf8b5487da2d098b417e6_***_Rachel Chalmers
62586459693e05b2e1063967e76883f1_***_Angharad Davies
author Rachel Chalmers
Angharad Davies
author2 Rachel Chalmers
Angharad Davies
Kevin Tyler
format Journal article
container_title Microbiology
container_volume 165
container_issue 5
container_start_page 500
publishDate 2019
institution Swansea University
issn 1350-0872
1465-2080
doi_str_mv 10.1099/mic.0.000764
publisher Microbiology Society
college_str Faculty of Medicine, Health and Life Sciences
hierarchytype
hierarchy_top_id facultyofmedicinehealthandlifesciences
hierarchy_top_title Faculty of Medicine, Health and Life Sciences
hierarchy_parent_id facultyofmedicinehealthandlifesciences
hierarchy_parent_title Faculty of Medicine, Health and Life Sciences
department_str Swansea University Medical School - Medicine{{{_:::_}}}Faculty of Medicine, Health and Life Sciences{{{_:::_}}}Swansea University Medical School - Medicine
document_store_str 1
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description The protozoan Cryptosporidium is notorious for its resistance to chlorine disinfection, a mainstay of water treatment. Human infections, mainly of the small intestine, arise from consumption of faecally contaminated food or water, environmental exposure, and person-to-person or animal-to-person spread. Acute gastrointestinal symptoms can be prolonged but are usually self-limiting. Problems arise with immune-deficient, including malnourished, people including chronic diarrhoea, hepato-biliary tree and extra-gastrointestinal site infection, and few options for treatment or prevention exist. Although genomics has enabled refined classification, identification of chemotherapeutic targets and vaccine candidates, and putative factors for host adaption and pathogenesis, their confirmation has been hampered by a lack of biological tools.
published_date 2019-05-03T04:09:24Z
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score 10.926886