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'Does anyone even notice us?' COVID-19's impact on academics' well-being in a developing country

Joanne Hardman, Richard Watermeyer, Kalpana Shankar, Venkata Ratnadeep Suri, Tom Crick Orcid Logo, Cathryn Knight Orcid Logo, Fiona McGaughey, Roger Chung Orcid Logo

South African Journal of Higher Education, Volume: 36, Issue: 1, Pages: 1 - 19

Swansea University Authors: Tom Crick Orcid Logo, Cathryn Knight Orcid Logo

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DOI (Published version): 10.20853/36-1-4844.

Abstract

In March 2020, the President of South African announced that the nation would go into full lockdown in the wake of an increase in COVID-19 infections. Academics had, in some instances, only one day to prepare for ‘emergency remote teaching’. Few academics had taught online before, as South Africa’s...

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Published in: South African Journal of Higher Education
ISSN: 1753-5913
Published: 2022
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URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa58260
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first_indexed 2021-10-07T07:06:08Z
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spelling 2022-04-29T12:24:24.8938145 v2 58260 2021-10-07 'Does anyone even notice us?' COVID-19's impact on academics' well-being in a developing country 200c66ef0fc55391f736f6e926fb4b99 0000-0001-5196-9389 Tom Crick Tom Crick true false e43d033fc7f2ccc9317c49df10b9b7bb 0000-0002-7574-3090 Cathryn Knight Cathryn Knight true false 2021-10-07 EDUC In March 2020, the President of South African announced that the nation would go into full lockdown in the wake of an increase in COVID-19 infections. Academics had, in some instances, only one day to prepare for ‘emergency remote teaching’. Few academics had taught online before, as South Africa’s internet connectivity is not guaranteed in underprivileged areas, where 80% of the population reside. The online move thus necessitated an entirely novel pedagogy for most academics, with high potential for an escalation of work-related stress and related illness, outcomes we have related in the wider sphere of workplace readjustment during COVID-19, to a state of 'pandemia'. In this paper, we report on an institutional case study where we surveyed n=136 academics from a university in the Western Cape, South Africa to learn more about impacts of COVID-19 on their work. The data analysis adopts Ryff's (1995) theory of well-being. Findings indicate that the enforced lockdown due to COVID-19 and the subsequent move to online teaching has had a negative impact on academics’ sense of well-being. However, the emergence of positive, caring relationships between colleagues is reported as a significant outcome of the COVID-19 enforced move to online teaching. Journal Article South African Journal of Higher Education 36 1 1 19 1753-5913 31 3 2022 2022-03-31 10.20853/36-1-4844. https://www.journals.ac.za/index.php/sajhe/article/view/4844 COLLEGE NANME Education COLLEGE CODE EDUC Swansea University Not Required 2022-04-29T12:24:24.8938145 2021-10-07T07:56:25.5344958 College of Arts and Humanities School of Education Joanne Hardman 1 Richard Watermeyer 2 Kalpana Shankar 3 Venkata Ratnadeep Suri 4 Tom Crick 0000-0001-5196-9389 5 Cathryn Knight 0000-0002-7574-3090 6 Fiona McGaughey 7 Roger Chung 0000-0003-4407-8208 8 58260__23759__ce445d38b68c4ed98e495b60280de31d.pdf does anyone even notice us SAJHE.pdf 2022-04-01T14:07:40.2484416 Output 625953 application/pdf Version of Record true Copyright (c) 2021 J. Hardman, Richard Watermeyer, Kalpana Shankar, Venkata Ratnadeep Suri, Thomas Crick, Kathryn Knight, Fiona McGaughey This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License. true eng https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
title 'Does anyone even notice us?' COVID-19's impact on academics' well-being in a developing country
spellingShingle 'Does anyone even notice us?' COVID-19's impact on academics' well-being in a developing country
Tom Crick
Cathryn Knight
title_short 'Does anyone even notice us?' COVID-19's impact on academics' well-being in a developing country
title_full 'Does anyone even notice us?' COVID-19's impact on academics' well-being in a developing country
title_fullStr 'Does anyone even notice us?' COVID-19's impact on academics' well-being in a developing country
title_full_unstemmed 'Does anyone even notice us?' COVID-19's impact on academics' well-being in a developing country
title_sort 'Does anyone even notice us?' COVID-19's impact on academics' well-being in a developing country
author_id_str_mv 200c66ef0fc55391f736f6e926fb4b99
e43d033fc7f2ccc9317c49df10b9b7bb
author_id_fullname_str_mv 200c66ef0fc55391f736f6e926fb4b99_***_Tom Crick
e43d033fc7f2ccc9317c49df10b9b7bb_***_Cathryn Knight
author Tom Crick
Cathryn Knight
author2 Joanne Hardman
Richard Watermeyer
Kalpana Shankar
Venkata Ratnadeep Suri
Tom Crick
Cathryn Knight
Fiona McGaughey
Roger Chung
format Journal article
container_title South African Journal of Higher Education
container_volume 36
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institution Swansea University
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url https://www.journals.ac.za/index.php/sajhe/article/view/4844
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description In March 2020, the President of South African announced that the nation would go into full lockdown in the wake of an increase in COVID-19 infections. Academics had, in some instances, only one day to prepare for ‘emergency remote teaching’. Few academics had taught online before, as South Africa’s internet connectivity is not guaranteed in underprivileged areas, where 80% of the population reside. The online move thus necessitated an entirely novel pedagogy for most academics, with high potential for an escalation of work-related stress and related illness, outcomes we have related in the wider sphere of workplace readjustment during COVID-19, to a state of 'pandemia'. In this paper, we report on an institutional case study where we surveyed n=136 academics from a university in the Western Cape, South Africa to learn more about impacts of COVID-19 on their work. The data analysis adopts Ryff's (1995) theory of well-being. Findings indicate that the enforced lockdown due to COVID-19 and the subsequent move to online teaching has had a negative impact on academics’ sense of well-being. However, the emergence of positive, caring relationships between colleagues is reported as a significant outcome of the COVID-19 enforced move to online teaching.
published_date 2022-03-31T04:32:26Z
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