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Impact of the COVID-19 Pandemic on Sedentary Time and Behaviour in Children and Adults: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

Adam Runacres, Kelly Mackintosh Orcid Logo, Rachel Knight, Liba Sheeran, Rhys Thatcher, James Shelley, Melitta McNarry Orcid Logo

International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, Volume: 18, Issue: 21, Start page: 11286

Swansea University Authors: Adam Runacres, Kelly Mackintosh Orcid Logo, Rachel Knight, James Shelley, Melitta McNarry Orcid Logo

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Abstract

The aim of this meta-analysis was to quantify the change in sedentary time during the COVID-19 pandemic and its effect on health outcomes in the general population. One thousand six hundred and one articles published after 2019 were retrieved from five databases, of which 64 and 40 were included in...

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Published in: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
ISSN: 1660-4601
Published: MDPI AG 2021
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URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa58532
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One thousand six hundred and one articles published after 2019 were retrieved from five databases, of which 64 and 40 were included in the systematic review and meta-analysis, respectively. Studies were grouped according to population: children (&lt;18 years), adults (18&#x2013;64 years) and older adults (&gt;65 years). Average sedentary time was calculated, with sub-analyses performed by country, behaviour type and health outcomes. Children were most affected, increasing their sedentary time by 159.5 &#xB1; 142.6 min day&#x2212;1, followed by adults (+126.9 &#xB1; 42.2 min day&#x2212;1) and older adults (+46.9 &#xB1; 22.0 min day&#x2212;1). There were no sex differences in any age group. Screen time was the only consistently measured behaviour and accounted for 46.8% and 57.2% of total sedentary time in children and adults, respectively. Increases in sedentary time were negatively correlated with global mental health, depression, anxiety and quality of life, irrespective of age. Whilst lockdown negatively affected all age groups, children were more negatively affected than adults or older adults, highlighting this population as a key intervention target. As lockdowns ease worldwide, strategies should be employed to reduce time spent sedentary. 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spelling 2021-11-23T12:14:46.2079552 v2 58532 2021-11-02 Impact of the COVID-19 Pandemic on Sedentary Time and Behaviour in Children and Adults: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis 2a650b8b1240fe1382ce33ff2661d62e Adam Runacres Adam Runacres true false bdb20e3f31bcccf95c7bc116070c4214 0000-0003-0355-6357 Kelly Mackintosh Kelly Mackintosh true false c9c8a7cb0a508f8a063162f751323097 Rachel Knight Rachel Knight true false 120b09997c79f9494ca91b8a7706efe4 James Shelley James Shelley true false 062f5697ff59f004bc8c713955988398 0000-0003-0813-7477 Melitta McNarry Melitta McNarry true false 2021-11-02 FGSEN The aim of this meta-analysis was to quantify the change in sedentary time during the COVID-19 pandemic and its effect on health outcomes in the general population. One thousand six hundred and one articles published after 2019 were retrieved from five databases, of which 64 and 40 were included in the systematic review and meta-analysis, respectively. Studies were grouped according to population: children (<18 years), adults (18–64 years) and older adults (>65 years). Average sedentary time was calculated, with sub-analyses performed by country, behaviour type and health outcomes. Children were most affected, increasing their sedentary time by 159.5 ± 142.6 min day−1, followed by adults (+126.9 ± 42.2 min day−1) and older adults (+46.9 ± 22.0 min day−1). There were no sex differences in any age group. Screen time was the only consistently measured behaviour and accounted for 46.8% and 57.2% of total sedentary time in children and adults, respectively. Increases in sedentary time were negatively correlated with global mental health, depression, anxiety and quality of life, irrespective of age. Whilst lockdown negatively affected all age groups, children were more negatively affected than adults or older adults, highlighting this population as a key intervention target. As lockdowns ease worldwide, strategies should be employed to reduce time spent sedentary. Trial registration: PROSPERO (CRD42020208909) Journal Article International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 18 21 11286 MDPI AG 1660-4601 mental health; gender; screen time; older adults; country; lockdown 27 10 2021 2021-10-27 10.3390/ijerph182111286 COLLEGE NANME Science and Engineering - Faculty COLLEGE CODE FGSEN Swansea University Other Sport Wales 2021-11-23T12:14:46.2079552 2021-11-02T15:56:01.0606757 Faculty of Science and Engineering School of Aerospace, Civil, Electrical, General and Mechanical Engineering - Sport and Exercise Sciences Adam Runacres 1 Kelly Mackintosh 0000-0003-0355-6357 2 Rachel Knight 3 Liba Sheeran 4 Rhys Thatcher 5 James Shelley 6 Melitta McNarry 0000-0003-0813-7477 7 58532__21639__eb7994ac6fa9451295fc101273eaeee7.pdf 58532.pdf 2021-11-23T12:12:30.2819474 Output 603262 application/pdf Version of Record true © 2021 by the authors. This article is an open access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license true eng https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
title Impact of the COVID-19 Pandemic on Sedentary Time and Behaviour in Children and Adults: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis
spellingShingle Impact of the COVID-19 Pandemic on Sedentary Time and Behaviour in Children and Adults: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis
Adam Runacres
Kelly Mackintosh
Rachel Knight
James Shelley
Melitta McNarry
title_short Impact of the COVID-19 Pandemic on Sedentary Time and Behaviour in Children and Adults: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis
title_full Impact of the COVID-19 Pandemic on Sedentary Time and Behaviour in Children and Adults: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis
title_fullStr Impact of the COVID-19 Pandemic on Sedentary Time and Behaviour in Children and Adults: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis
title_full_unstemmed Impact of the COVID-19 Pandemic on Sedentary Time and Behaviour in Children and Adults: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis
title_sort Impact of the COVID-19 Pandemic on Sedentary Time and Behaviour in Children and Adults: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis
author_id_str_mv 2a650b8b1240fe1382ce33ff2661d62e
bdb20e3f31bcccf95c7bc116070c4214
c9c8a7cb0a508f8a063162f751323097
120b09997c79f9494ca91b8a7706efe4
062f5697ff59f004bc8c713955988398
author_id_fullname_str_mv 2a650b8b1240fe1382ce33ff2661d62e_***_Adam Runacres
bdb20e3f31bcccf95c7bc116070c4214_***_Kelly Mackintosh
c9c8a7cb0a508f8a063162f751323097_***_Rachel Knight
120b09997c79f9494ca91b8a7706efe4_***_James Shelley
062f5697ff59f004bc8c713955988398_***_Melitta McNarry
author Adam Runacres
Kelly Mackintosh
Rachel Knight
James Shelley
Melitta McNarry
author2 Adam Runacres
Kelly Mackintosh
Rachel Knight
Liba Sheeran
Rhys Thatcher
James Shelley
Melitta McNarry
format Journal article
container_title International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
container_volume 18
container_issue 21
container_start_page 11286
publishDate 2021
institution Swansea University
issn 1660-4601
doi_str_mv 10.3390/ijerph182111286
publisher MDPI AG
college_str Faculty of Science and Engineering
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hierarchy_top_id facultyofscienceandengineering
hierarchy_top_title Faculty of Science and Engineering
hierarchy_parent_id facultyofscienceandengineering
hierarchy_parent_title Faculty of Science and Engineering
department_str School of Aerospace, Civil, Electrical, General and Mechanical Engineering - Sport and Exercise Sciences{{{_:::_}}}Faculty of Science and Engineering{{{_:::_}}}School of Aerospace, Civil, Electrical, General and Mechanical Engineering - Sport and Exercise Sciences
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description The aim of this meta-analysis was to quantify the change in sedentary time during the COVID-19 pandemic and its effect on health outcomes in the general population. One thousand six hundred and one articles published after 2019 were retrieved from five databases, of which 64 and 40 were included in the systematic review and meta-analysis, respectively. Studies were grouped according to population: children (<18 years), adults (18–64 years) and older adults (>65 years). Average sedentary time was calculated, with sub-analyses performed by country, behaviour type and health outcomes. Children were most affected, increasing their sedentary time by 159.5 ± 142.6 min day−1, followed by adults (+126.9 ± 42.2 min day−1) and older adults (+46.9 ± 22.0 min day−1). There were no sex differences in any age group. Screen time was the only consistently measured behaviour and accounted for 46.8% and 57.2% of total sedentary time in children and adults, respectively. Increases in sedentary time were negatively correlated with global mental health, depression, anxiety and quality of life, irrespective of age. Whilst lockdown negatively affected all age groups, children were more negatively affected than adults or older adults, highlighting this population as a key intervention target. As lockdowns ease worldwide, strategies should be employed to reduce time spent sedentary. Trial registration: PROSPERO (CRD42020208909)
published_date 2021-10-27T04:11:07Z
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