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Prevalence and determinants of depression up to 5 years after colorectal cancer surgery: Results from the ColoREctal Wellbeing (CREW) study

Lynn Calman, Joshua Turner, Deborah Fenlon, Natalia V. Permyakova, Sally Wheelwright, Mubarak Patel, Amy Din, Jane Winter, Alison Richardson, Peter W. F. Smith, Claire Foster, (The CREW Study Advisory Committee)

Colorectal Disease, Volume: 23, Issue: 12

Swansea University Author: Deborah Fenlon

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DOI (Published version): 10.1111/codi.15949

Abstract

Depression experienced by people with colorectal cancer (CRC) is an important clinical problem affecting quality of life. Recognition at key points in the pathway enables timely referral to support. This study aimed to examine depression pre- and 5 years post-surgery to examine its prevalence and id...

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Published in: Colorectal Disease
ISSN: 1462-8910 1463-1318
Published: Wiley 2021
Online Access: Check full text

URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa58569
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Abstract: Depression experienced by people with colorectal cancer (CRC) is an important clinical problem affecting quality of life. Recognition at key points in the pathway enables timely referral to support. This study aimed to examine depression pre- and 5 years post-surgery to examine its prevalence and identify determinants. The ColoREctal Wellbeing (CREW) study is a prospective UK cohort involving 872 adults with non-metastatic CRC recruited before curative-intent surgery. Questionnaires completed pre-surgery, and 3, 9, 15, 24, 36, 48 and 60 months post-surgery, captured socio-demographics, assessed depression (Centre for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale, CES-D) and other psychosocial factors. Clinical details were also gathered. We present prevalence of clinically significant depression (CES-D≥20) over time and its predictors assessed pre-surgery and 2 years post-surgery. Pre-surgery, 21.0% of the cohort reported CES-D≥20 reducing to 14.7% 5 years post-surgery. Pre-surgery risk factors predicting subsequent depression were clinically significant depression and anxiety, previous mental health service use, low self-efficacy, poor health, having neoadjuvant treatment and low social support. Post-surgery risk factors at 2 years predicting subsequent depression were clinically significant depression, negative affect, cognitive dysfunction, accommodation type and poor health. Depression is highly pervasive in people with CRC, exceeding general population prevalence across follow-up. Our findings emphasise the need to screen and treat depression across the pathway. Our novel data highlight key risk factors of later depression at important and opportune time points: pre-surgery and the end of routine surveillance. Early recognition and timely referral to appropriate support is vital to improve long-term psychological outcomes. [Abstract copyright: This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.]
Keywords: colorectal cancer; determinants; depression; quality of life; risk factors
College: College of Human and Health Sciences
Funders: Macmillan Cancer Support as part of the Macmillan Survivorship Research Group programme (grant no. 3546834).
Issue: 12