No Cover Image

Journal article 444 views 36 downloads

Comorbidities are associated with poorer quality of life and functioning and worse symptoms in the 5 years following colorectal cancer surgery: Results from the ColoREctal Well-being (CREW) cohort study

Amanda Cummings, Chloe Grimmett, Lynn Calman, Mubarak Patel, Natalia Vadimovna Permyakova, Jane Winter, Jessica Corner, Amy Din, Deborah Fenlon, Alison Richardson, Peter W. Smith, Claire Foster

Psycho-Oncology, Volume: 27, Issue: 10, Pages: 2427 - 2435

Swansea University Author: Deborah Fenlon

  • 41192VoR.pdf

    PDF | Version of Record

    This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License.

    Download (383.99KB)

Check full text

DOI (Published version): 10.1002/pon.4845

Abstract

ObjectiveMore people are living with the consequences of cancer and comorbidity. We describe frequencies of comorbidities in a colorectal cancer cohort and associations with health and wellbeing outcomes up to five years following surgery. MethodsProspective cohort study of 872 colorectal cancer pat...

Full description

Published in: Psycho-Oncology
ISSN: 10579249
Published: 2018
Online Access: Check full text

URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa41192
Tags: Add Tag
No Tags, Be the first to tag this record!
Abstract: ObjectiveMore people are living with the consequences of cancer and comorbidity. We describe frequencies of comorbidities in a colorectal cancer cohort and associations with health and wellbeing outcomes up to five years following surgery. MethodsProspective cohort study of 872 colorectal cancer patients recruited 2010-2012 from 29 UK centres, awaiting curative intent surgery. Questionnaires administered at baseline (pre-surgery), 3, 9, 15, 24 months, and annually up to 5 years. Comorbidities (and whether they limit activities) were self-reported by participants from 3 months. The EORTC QLQ-C30 and QLQ-CR29 assessed global health/quality of life (QoL), symptoms and functioning. Longitudinal analyses investigated associations between comorbidities and health and wellbeing outcomes. ResultsAt baseline, the mean age of participants was 68 years, with 60% male and 65% colon cancer. 32% had one and 40% had >2 comorbidities. The most common comorbidities were high blood pressure (43%), arthritis/rheumatism (32%) and anxiety/depression (18%). Of those with comorbidities, 37% reported at least one that limited their daily activities. Reporting any limiting comorbidities was associated with poorer global health/QoL, worse symptoms and poorer functioning on all domains over 5 years’ follow-up. Controlling for the most common individual comorbidities, depression/anxiety had the greatest deleterious effect on outcomes. ConclusionsClinical assessment should prioritise patient-reported comorbidities and whether these comorbidities limit daily activities, as important determinants of recovery of QoL, symptoms and functioning following colorectal cancer. Targeted interventions and support services, including multi-professional management and tailored assessment and follow-up, may aid recovery of health and wellbeing recovery in these individuals.
Keywords: Cancer, Oncology, Colorectal cancer, Comorbidities, Health and wellbeing, Longitudinal, Quality of life, Survivorship
College: College of Human and Health Sciences
Issue: 10
Start Page: 2427
End Page: 2435