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Using Computer Assisted Translation tools’ Translation Quality Assessment functionalities to assess students’ translations

Jun Yang

The Language Scholar, Issue: 1

Swansea University Author: Jun Yang

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Abstract

Translation quality assessment (TQA) is essential in translator training. For formative andmeaningful feedback, quantitative methods of error-type categories are frequently used toevaluate students’ translations. However, because the annotation of the errors made bystudents still tends to be done in...

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Published in: The Language Scholar
ISSN: 2398-8509
Published: Leeds Centre for Excellence in Language Teaching 2017
Online Access: Check full text

URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa58589
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Abstract: Translation quality assessment (TQA) is essential in translator training. For formative andmeaningful feedback, quantitative methods of error-type categories are frequently used toevaluate students’ translations. However, because the annotation of the errors made bystudents still tends to be done in a Word document, which requires redundant manual workand the result often lacks consistency and clarity. We propose using CAT environments formore efficient TQA. One the one hand, it will bridge the gap between the training and industryby familiarising students with current industry translation practices; on the other hand, it willassist with the design and analysis for formative assessment that could guide the learning ofnot only one student, but of whole cohort of students. The current paper uses SDL TradosStudio as an example to demonstrate how translation evaluation works in a CAT environment.Through the discussion of practical challenges and advantages of implementing a TQA in thetranslation classroom, we highlight the clarity both of expression and of presentation offeedback and evaluation and the long-term benefits in recording the students’ individual andgroup progress of all times to make data-driven choices regarding the training curriculum.
Keywords: translation quality assessment, computer-assisted translation tools, translator training
College: College of Arts and Humanities
Issue: 1