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Epidemiology, aetiology and knowledge, attitudes, and practices relating to burn injuries in Palestine: A community‐level research / Ali H. Abu Ibaid, Caitlin Hebron, Hana'a A. Qaysse, Melanie J. Coyne, Tom Potokar, Fikr A. Shalltoot, Mahmoud A. Shalabi

International Wound Journal

Swansea University Authors: Caitlin Hebron, Tom Potokar

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DOI (Published version): 10.1111/iwj.13716

Abstract

The aim of this study was to identify the epidemiology, aetiology as well as the knowledge, attitudes, and practices relating to burn injuries in Palestine. A mixed‐method approach was used. A survey was distributed to a total of 1500 households selected by randomised approach. The survey was standa...

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Published in: International Wound Journal
ISSN: 1742-4801 1742-481X
Published: Wiley 2021
Online Access: Check full text

URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa58616
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Abstract: The aim of this study was to identify the epidemiology, aetiology as well as the knowledge, attitudes, and practices relating to burn injuries in Palestine. A mixed‐method approach was used. A survey was distributed to a total of 1500 households selected by randomised approach. The survey was standardised based on World Health Organisation's guidelines for conducting community surveys on injury. Additionally, there were 12 focus group discussions and 10 key informant interviews to collect rich qualitative data. In the West Bank and Gaza, 1.5% of Palestinians had experienced serious burn injuries in the 12 months. The total sample of 1500 yields a margin of error (plus/minus) = 2.5% at a 95% level of confidence and a response distribution (P = 50%) with 3% non‐response rate. Of the 1500 households approached, 184 reported a total of 196 burn injuries, with 87.2% occurring inside the home: 69.4% were females and 39.3% were children. The main source of reported cause of burn was heat and flame (36%), electric current (31.6%), hot liquid (28.6%), and chemicals (2.7%). The most common first aid for burns was pouring water (74.7%). People in rural, refugee, and Bedouin settings had the highest incidence of burns. This study provides the burn prevalence rate, explanatory factors that contribute to the frequency of burns in Palestine. Making burn prevention a higher priority within the national policy is crucial.
Keywords: burn; epidemiology; Gaza; implementation science; West Bank
College: College of Human and Health Sciences
Funders: the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR), NIHR Global Health Research Group on Burn Trauma, Grant Reference Grant: 16/137/110