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Quality improvement training for burn care in low-and middle-income countries: A pilot course for nurses

Maria Holden, Edna Ogada Orcid Logo, Caitlin Hebron, Tricia Price, Tom Potokar Orcid Logo

Burns, Volume: 48, Issue: 1, Pages: 201 - 214

Swansea University Authors: Edna Ogada Orcid Logo, Caitlin Hebron, Tricia Price, Tom Potokar Orcid Logo

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Abstract

BackgroundThere is an urgent need to empower practitioners to undertake quality improvement (QI) projects in burn services in low-middle income countries (LMICs). We piloted a course aimed to equip nurses working in these environments with the knowledge and skills to undertake such projects.MethodsE...

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Published in: Burns
ISSN: 0305-4179
Published: Elsevier BV 2022
Online Access: Check full text

URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa59131
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Abstract: BackgroundThere is an urgent need to empower practitioners to undertake quality improvement (QI) projects in burn services in low-middle income countries (LMICs). We piloted a course aimed to equip nurses working in these environments with the knowledge and skills to undertake such projects.MethodsEight nurses from five burns services across Malawi and Ethiopia took part in this pilot course, which was evaluated using a range of methods, including interviews and focus group discussions.ResultsCourse evaluations reported that interactive activities were successful in supporting participants to devise QI projects. Appropriate online platforms were integral to creating a community of practice and maintaining engagement. Facilitators to a successful QI project were active individuals, supportive leadership, collaboration, effective knowledge sharing and demonstrable advantages of any proposed change. Barriers included: staff attitudes, poor leadership, negative culture towards training, resource limitations, staff rotation and poor access to information to guide practice.ConclusionsThe course demonstrated that by bringing nurses together, through interactive teaching and online forums, a supportive community of practice can be created. Future work will include investigating ways to scale up access to the course so staff can be supported to initiate and lead quality improvement in LMIC burn services.
Keywords: Quality improvement; Service improvement; Nursing development; Low-middle income countries; Malawi; Ethiopia
College: College of Human and Health Sciences
Funders: National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Grant: HHR1013-10
Issue: 1
Start Page: 201
End Page: 214